How Rush Limbaugh Made Millennials Like Me Conservative

  

Category:  Op/Ed

Via:  donald-j-trump-fan-1  •  7 months ago  •  5 comments

By:   Nicole Russell

How Rush Limbaugh Made Millennials Like Me Conservative
Along with the one-on-one time I had with my dad, three hours of Rush Limbaugh’s ideas, observations, wit, and humor provided everything I needed for a foundation in conservative thought. Limbaugh’s quirks grew on me until they became inside jokes with my dad. The golden microphone. The dramatic paper shuffling. The cigar smoking. I wondered: When Limbaugh did that sneezing-squeal, was he laughing, crying, or just old? Talking from the “Southern Command,” Limbaugh seemed untouchable, yet so...

Rush Limbaugh is a great American.  He has influenced two or three generations toward conservative values and beliefs.  I’ve been listening to him when I can for 35 years.  I pray that God and medical science will restore him to health cancer free and that he can carry on his show for as long as he wants to do it.  Thanks to President Trump for awarding our hero and champion with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in Nancy’s House on national TV. 


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Along with the one-on-one time with my dad, three hours of Rush Limbaugh’s observations, wit, and humor provided everything I needed for a foundation in conservative thought.



I grew up in Minnesota, the heart of the Midwest: a blue state of really nice, hard-working people who love winter, lefse, and Al Franken. Starting at about 13 years old until college, I worked for my dad, a successful remodeling contractor, over school breaks.

I hated the work. Often the only female on a construction site or a hotel in the midst of remodeling, I felt awkward. I got dirty. I wasn’t good at painting or wallpapering. The hours were longer than anything I’d ever experienced, and we rarely ate out during the day. (Somehow cold granola bars just added to the laboriousness.)

I know, I sound like a wimp. I was. I gained great respect for hard-working men and blue-collar workers during that period. The only glimmer of happiness in the job was that I got quality time with my dad and this other guy: Rush Limbaugh, who recently announced he has been diagnosed with “advanced lung cancer.”

At every job site, the routine was the same: I’d dress in painters’ clothes, drive to the site with my dad, and along with all the tools we set up, we plugged in the radio set to AM 1500 KSTP. If memory serves, Limbaugh didn’t come on until 11 a.m. The next three hours were a respite of opinion, intellectual stimulation, and philosophical and political concepts I’d barely thought of yet.

As other workers labored nearby, I forgot the sounds of construction and my self-pity faded. Over time I started looking forward to this part of the day more than anything else. Along with the one-on-one time I had with my dad, three hours of Rush Limbaugh’s ideas, observations, wit, and humor provided everything I needed for a foundation in conservative thought.

Limbaugh’s quirks grew on me until they became inside jokes with my dad. The golden microphone. The dramatic paper shuffling. The cigar smoking. I wondered: When Limbaugh did that sneezing-squeal, was he laughing, crying, or just old?

Talking from the “Southern Command,” Limbaugh seemed untouchable, yet so in touch with politics, culture, and what the Everyman needed to know. His arrogance, sardonic jokes, and disdain for the media coupled with his cigar smoking had a jerkboy-fraternity-meets-William F. Buckley appeal.

I couldn’t get enough of how he stripped bare the ideas Buckley wrote about so that even a young teenager could understand. Between commercial breaks or callers, I would ask my dad what Limbaugh meant about the topics he was covering that day: welfare, the media, and liberal ideology.

I’m not exaggerating when I say I learned about core conservative principles through my dad’s interpretations of Limbaugh’s monologues and observations of critical news of the day. Later, I developed these ideas into a more cohesive political philosophy through the influence of other teachers and reading iconic authors. In college, I minored in political science—an homage to the “Rush baby” inside.

Limbaugh Created Comraderie Among Those He Influenced


I began an “adult” life: graduated from college, worked in politics, started a family, and moved to Northern Virginia, where I met some of the most influential members of the media and politics working today. I wrote for The Atlantic, Politico, The New York Times, National Review Online. I observed something incredible: Limbaugh was right.

He was right about the MSM (“the mainstream media”) he loathed, elitists, and liberals. While living nearly ten years outside DC, I observed how mainstream media skewed to the left and that Limbaugh’s observations were spot-on. One only needs to spend a little time in D.C. or New York City to see how pervasive leftist rot has become.

Limbaugh’s talking points became my talking points, and I discovered I could talk to painters or attorneys equally about conservative ideas. Even if I ended up talking with lawyers who tried cases at the Supreme Court, I could  sort of  keep up. Countless hours of Limbaugh’s history lessons, sharp media analysis, and relentless commitment to conservative ideals—free market, individualism, religious liberty, small government—were embedded in my mind.

Whether I met media icons, politicians, lobbyists, lawyers, or Supreme Court justices, and whether I met them at fancy galas, fundraisers, the Federalist Society, or Fox News, Limbaugh’s Buckley meets the common man conservatism proved true over and over. My dad wasn’t the only one. I wasn’t the only one. There were throngs of us with various skill sets, different values, and changing priorities, but we all had the same purpose: we were lovers of liberty.

A Steady Influence for Decades


A cursory glance at Limbaugh’s career shows how he touched someone like me as a teenager, along with the likes of Ben Shapiro and countless others. In 2018, Limbaugh was  America’s most-listened-to  radio  host  and reached a monthly audience of 25 million on more than 650 stations. That year he was the world’s second highest-paid radio host, reportedly earning $84.5 million, just behind Howard Stern.

A 2008 Pew Research survey  found that Limbaugh drew a significantly conservative audience, including  National Rifle Association supporters  and what was known then as “Tea Partiers” and “Christian conservatives.” About  37 percent surveyed said  they tune in for opinion, but another 28 percent say they enjoy the blend of news, opinion, and entertainment. According to a 2009 survey,  only 28 percent  of Limbaugh’s audience is female. Even so, I got a kick out of the male-oriented humor. How not?

Even as Rush spoke to more than 25 million people, it felt like he was just talking to me. Were it not for his daily show, and filtering ideas I heard with my dad, I would not have become a political conservative, a writer, a lover of liberty, and as we say at The Federalist, anxious for the fray—a sentiment I know Limbaugh would appreciate.

I’ve wanted to write this essay for at least a decade, to tell people—or maybe just to tell him— how just one person can so powerfully influence another. Mr. Limbaugh, we the millennial Rush babies thank you. We wish you healing, grace, mega dittos, and many more cigars. You changed everything for us.

Nicole Russell is a senior contributor to The Federalist. She lives in northern Virginia with her four kids. 


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MAGA
1  seeder  MAGA    7 months ago

I wrote for The Atlantic, Politico, The New York Times, National Review Online. I observed something incredible: Limbaugh was right.

He was right about the MSM (“the mainstream media”) he loathed, elitists, and liberals. While living nearly ten years outside DC, I observed how mainstream media skewed to the left and that Limbaugh’s observations were spot-on. One only needs to spend a little time in D.C. or New York City to see how pervasive leftist rot has become.

Limbaugh’s talking points became my talking points, and I discovered I could talk to painters or attorneys equally about conservative ideas. Even if I ended up talking with lawyers who tried cases at the Supreme Court, I could   sort of  keep up. Countless hours of Limbaugh’s history lessons, sharp media analysis, and relentless commitment to conservative ideals—free market, individualism, religious liberty, small government—were embedded in my mind.

Whether I met media icons, politicians, lobbyists, lawyers, or Supreme Court justices, and whether I met them at fancy galas, fundraisers, the Federalist Society, or Fox News, Limbaugh’s Buckley meets the common man conservatism proved true over and over. My dad wasn’t the only one. I wasn’t the only one. There were throngs of us with various skill sets, different values, and changing priorities, but we all had the same purpose: we were lovers of liberty.

A Steady Influence For Decades   

https://thenewstalkers.com/community/discussion/49453/how-rush-limbaugh-made-millennials-like-me-conservative

 

 

 
 
 
MrFrost
2  MrFrost    7 months ago

512

 
 
 
MAGA
2.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  MrFrost @2    7 months ago

 ...Without any representation in popular culture, we were isolated.  We were prisoners in solitary confinement.  With isolation that thorough, there could be little communication among the prisoners.  The information blackout left us with nothing to discuss and no way of identifying our own allies.  But in 1988, that isolation ended. 

Never had so many people been so ready for one talk show host.  When Rush Limbaugh took to the airwaves in 1988, it was as if a dam had burst.  Rush's conservatism went beyond mere recitation of Republican talking points.  He did more than simply oppose taxes, crime, and deficit spending.  He added humor to his message.  He discussed his ideas philosophically, displaying a deep understanding of the underpinnings of our beliefs.  He remembered things that the establishment wanted to forget.  He never forgot a news story or a sound bite.  He made it harder for the media "giants" to change their stories at the drop of a hat.  He set his arguments to music.  He joked and sang where others before him were scared.  He showed no fear. 

Just as importantly, we quickly learned that others were joining in on the fun.  People were talking about Rush.  Conservatism was not merely something to be found in old books in a library basement.  The dystopian script was disappearing.  I was no longer alone (I never really had been).  I began to see bumper stickers, coffee mugs, and campaign-style buttons promoting Rush.  Friends discussed the show often.  I encountered "Rush rooms" in restaurants.  "Dan's Bake Sale" exceeded all expectations and received tremendous publicity.  Rush had forced his way into popular culture and brought the rest of us with him. 

width="375" height="312"> We realized that our beliefs were shared by many and that we had power.  Rush was the Voice of America broadcasting through the Iron Curtain.  Like the prisoners of the Iron Curtain, we needed these broadcasts for more than mere information.  We needed to know that our fellow prisoners knew the truth also.  The liberating and unifying effect of these broadcasts sometimes translated into election results that we never dreamed possible.  The unity that Rush provided helped stop some of the worst Clinton programs and gave us the momentum that resulted in the historic congressional elections of 1994 that liberated Congress for the first time in four decades.  There is nothing so dangerous to a totalitarian as a unified people that know they are not alone. At least partially because of Rush, socialized medicine was delayed by decades.  Millions of children were able to grow up without facing the medical horrors that are common in Europe, Canada, and other socialist countries.  Millions of Americans now own guns because the gun control schemes of the 1990s were delayed or reversed.  Many other leftist causes face skepticism and doubt because conservatives across the country have the courage and unity to say "no." While social media and cable television now provide for much of the communication that unifies conservatives, Rush was first.  The Rush phenomenon gave us the confidence to use the internet and speak out on the issues that matter.  The "dittoheads" of the 1990s became the pajama-wearing amateur journalists that would bedevil Dan Rather, CBS, and the rest of the establishment media in the following decade.  The "deplorables" of our most recent election can similarly trace their lineage back to the enthusiasm that began in the early days of Rush. .... https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/02/rush_limbaughs_true_contribution.html
 
 
 
MrFrost
3  MrFrost    7 months ago

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/28/us/rush-limbaugh-arrested-on-prescription-drug-charges.html

This is the guy that spent YEARS complaining about drug users..  Gets caught, then tries to blame it all on his ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT housekeeper. 

 
 
 
MAGA
3.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  MrFrost @3    7 months ago

Even as Rush spoke to more than 25 million people, it felt like he was just talking to me. Were it not for his daily show, and filtering ideas I heard with my dad, I would not have become a political conservative, a writer, a lover of liberty, and as we say at The Federalist, anxious for the fray—a sentiment I know Limbaugh would appreciate.

I’ve wanted to write this essay for at least a decade, to tell people—or maybe just to tell him— how just one person can so powerfully influence another. Mr. Limbaugh, we the millennial Rush babies thank you. We wish you healing, grace, mega dittos, and many more cigars. You changed everything for us.   https://thenewstalkers.com/community/discussion/49453/how-rush-limbaugh-made-millennials-like-me-conservative#cm1252780

 
 
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