Daunte Wright shooting: Officer Kim Potter has been charged with 2nd-degree manslaughter

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  john-russell  •  4 weeks ago  •  130 comments

By:   Jason Hanna, Brad Parks and Madeline Holcombe (MSN)

Daunte Wright shooting: Officer Kim Potter has been charged with 2nd-degree manslaughter
A police officer who authorities say shot and killed a Black man in a Minneapolis suburb after a traffic stop has been charged with second-degree manslaughter, a prosecutor said Wednesday.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



A police officer who authorities say shot and killed a Black man in a Minneapolis suburb after a traffic stop has been arrested and charged with second-degree manslaughter in the case, authorities said Wednesday.

Potter was arrested late Wednesday morning by agents with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, and will be booked into the Hennepin County Jail, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension said.

In Minnesota, second-degree manslaughter applies when authorities allege a person causes someone's death by "culpable negligence whereby the person creates an unreasonable risk, and consciously takes chances of causing death or great bodily harm to another."

Someone convicted of this charge would face a sentence of up to 10 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $20,000. CNN has sought comment from Potter's attorney, Earl Gray.

Wright's death Sunday in Brooklyn Center, which then-Police Chief Tim Gannon said appeared to be the result of Potter mistaking her gun for her Taser as Wright resisted arrest, has roiled a metropolitan area scarred by other police-involved deaths and reignited national conversations about policing and the use of force.

Developments in the investigation have unfolded daily, including the release of body camera footage and Gannon's statement that the shooting appeared accidental on Monday, and the resignations of Potter and Gannon on Tuesday.

Protests, some violent, have taken place each night in and around Brooklyn Center. Wright's family had called for charges against the officer.

Demonstrations Tuesday began peacefully, but chaos erupted around the Brooklyn Center police station by evening. Officers used pepper spray and fired flash bombs at protesters, who hurled water bottles and other projectiles at officers in riot gear.

The unified law enforcement command in Brooklyn Center made "upwards of 60 arrests" Tuesday night, many of which were for "riot and other criminal behaviors," Chief of the Minnesota State Patrol Matt Langer said.

Though Potter has submitted a resignation letter, Mayor Mike Elliott said Tuesday he has not accepted it, adding "we're doing our internal process to make sure that we are being accountable to the steps that we need to take." Earlier, he told CBS he thought Potter should be fired.

Orput is the prosecutor in Washington County, near Hennepin County, where Brooklyn Center is. The case was given to Washington County prosecutors to avoid the appearance of conflict of interest in Hennepin County, officials have said.

Sunday's killing of Wright is at least the third high-profile death of a Black man during a police encounter in the Minneapolis area in the past five years, after the shooting of Philando Castile in Falcon Heights in 2016 and the death of George Floyd last year. Minneapolis police also were under scrutiny when an officer was convicted of third-degree murder and manslaughter for the 2017 fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk, a White woman.

The trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer accused of killing Floyd, is taking place just 10 miles from Brooklyn Center.

Gray, Potter's attorney, also is the attorney for Thomas Lane, one of four officers involved in Floyd's death, and one of the defense attorneys for Jeronimo Yanez, the former police officer who was found not guilty in Castile's death.

Protesters scale fence outside FBI office


In Tuesday's demonstrations, protesters were seen scaling a fence outside the FBI office, holding a banner reading, "Justice for Daunte Wright." Members of the National Guard were in Brooklyn Center, Minneapolis and St. Paul.

By the time the city's 10 p.m. curfew started, hundreds of protesters had dwindled to a few dozen. With officers and police vehicles forming a line across front yards and the street blocking the police precinct, those remaining draped themselves in blankets and lit a small garbage fire in the falling snow.

On the street where protesters were once shoulder to shoulder, the few remaining chanted: "Say his name: Daunte Wright," and "I smell bacon, fry the pig."

Speaking at a late-night news conference, Hennepin County Sheriff David Hutchinson said there was recognition of the pain suffered in the community on Sunday night.

"The person (Kim Potter) is no longer a police officer, and they'll be held accountable for their actions," he said. "But we can't have people hurting our communities, we can't have people hurting the men and women who are paid to protect them."

Two families come together in tragedy


Floyd's family left the courthouse during Chauvin's trial Tuesday "because they thought it was important that they give comfort to Daunte Wright's mother" and family, attorney Ben Crump said at a news conference with the two families.

"We will stand in support with you. ... The world is traumatized, watching another African American man being slayed," said Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd. "I woke up in the morning with this on my mind. I don't want to see another victim."

The losses of both Wright and Floyd were acknowledged in Tuesday's protests. Demonstrators knelt for 9 minutes and 29 seconds, to symbolize the amount of time authorities say Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck.

And just as the Floyd family did last year, the Wright family is looking for more answers surrounding their loved one's death.

One of the family's attorneys, Jeffrey Storms, told CNN that Gannon's explanation -- that the shooting appeared to be an accident -- "is by no means proper or enough."

"There were a number of intentional events that led to (Daunte Wright) being dead, and we need to find out exactly why each one of those intentional events happened," Storms said Tuesday.

"Grabbing your sidearm that you've likely deployed thousands, if not tens of thousands, of times is an intentional act," Storms said. "A sidearm feels different than a Taser. It looks different than a Taser. (It) requires different pressure in order to deploy it."

Wright's father, Aubrey Wright, told ABC on Tuesday that he couldn't accept Gannon's explanation that Sunday's shooting was accidental.

"I can't accept that -- a mistake. That doesn't even sound right," he told ABC's "Good Morning America." He cited the officer's length of service -- authorities said she'd been with Brooklyn Center police for 26 years.

Wright's mother, Katie Wright, said she wanted to see the officer "held accountable for everything that she's taken from us."

"It should have never, ever escalated the way it did," Katie Wright told ABC.

What happened in traffic stop that ended Wright's life


Wright was with his girlfriend Sunday afternoon, driving to the house of his older brother, Damik Bryant.

Officers pulled him over in Brooklyn Center for an expired tag and learned he had an outstanding warrant, police said. It was not clear what the warrant was for.

Wright gave officers his name before calling his mother, Bryant said. His mother, Katie Wright, told reporters that Daunte Wright called her, and she heard a police officer ask him to put down his phone and get out of the car.

Daunte told her he'd explain why he was pulled over after he exited, she said. She eventually heard police ask him to hang up, and then scuffling, before the call ended, she said.

Body camera footage released Monday shows Wright standing outside his vehicle with his arms behind his back and an officer directly behind him, trying to handcuff him. An officer tells Wright "don't," before Wright twists away and gets back into the driver's seat of the car.

The officer whose camera footage was released is heard warning the man she's going to use her Taser on him, before repeatedly shouting, "Taser! Taser! Taser!"

Then, the officer is heard screaming, "Holy sh*t! I just shot him."

The car's door closes, and Wright drives away. The car crashed several blocks away, police said. Police and medical personnel attempted life-saving measures following the crash, but Wright died at the scene, Gannon said.

Gannon said the portion of body-worn camera footage released Monday led him to believe the shooting was accidental and that the officer's actions before the shooting were consistent with the department's training on Tasers.

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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    4 weeks ago
Then, the officer is heard screaming, "Holy sh*t! I just shot him."

I'm not sure that is the proper response. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1  Ender  replied to  JohnRussell @1    4 weeks ago

I have heard so much bullshit and people trying to blame the kid.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.1.1  Tessylo  replied to  Ender @1.1    4 weeks ago

It always seems to be victim blaming when it's a black person being killed.  It's deplorable.  

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
PhD Guide
1.1.2  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Tessylo @1.1.1    4 weeks ago

A horrible chain of events resulted in this tragedy.  My question is how does a 26 year veteran confuse a black side arm with a colored taser (yellow I think)?  The side arm is heavier and larger than a tg.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @1.1.2    4 weeks ago

Ok, please forgive this stupid question...but are both weapons carried on the same side of the body?

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
PhD Guide
1.1.4  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.3    4 weeks ago

It is my understanding that it is the opposite side to prevent confusing one from the other.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.6  Trout Giggles  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @1.1.4    4 weeks ago

ah-HA! I thought so. You would think a 26 year veteran of the PD would automatically know which side her taser is on

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.7  Kavika   replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.3    4 weeks ago

Protocol for Brooklyn Center PD is that your weapons are carried on your dominant side and the taser is carried on the nondominant side.  A right-hand person carries the taser on their left side.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.8  Trout Giggles  replied to  Kavika @1.1.7    4 weeks ago

That's what I thought

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
1.1.9  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Kavika @1.1.7    4 weeks ago

If i remember correctly ( its been a few years) , thats pretty much taught when one gets certified to carry a tazer , it is generally left to the individual if they carry it butt forward or back on the weak side 

butt forward allows for a weakside crossdraw with the dominant hand  from there it is just a matter of where on the patrol belt it is positioned .

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Participates
1.1.10  Greg Jones  replied to  Ender @1.1    4 weeks ago
I have heard so much bullshit and people trying to blame the kid.

The "kid" was resisting arrest...that kind of behavior usually results in bad outcomes.

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
1.1.11  Thomas  replied to  Kavika @1.1.7    3 weeks ago
Protocol for Brooklyn Center PD is that your weapons are carried on your dominant side and the taser is carried on the nondominant side.  A right-hand person carries the taser on their left side.

I believe that it is drawn with the dominant hand.

I am going to piss a bunch of you off right now and say that I personally believe that she intended to draw her Taser and drew her sidearm instead. 

I don't know how many times I've went to do something and I have had the improper implement in my hand. Shit Happens, and sometimes it is really, really bad shit that happens..

Now, this does not in any way excuse her from culpability for her actions and the involuntary manslaughter charge is, in my own personal opinion, the correct charge. 

The real questions that should be asked are about the stop and the attempted arrest that lead to the shooting and whether the use of force was appropriate to the infraction committed. We need to ensure that the actions taken by law enforcement are commensurate with the crimes alleged and the severity of action that caused the law enforcement interaction in the first place. As we saw with George Floyd, passing a phony $20 bill can cost your life. 

My heart goes out to both the family of the young man and the officer. 

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
1.1.12  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  Thomas @1.1.11    3 weeks ago

I agree.  It’s like when the cop is getting ready for work and gets distracted and sets his gun on the table, then his kid picks it up and shoots his sister.  Accidents happen.

Word to the wise - if you try to rob someone at gunpoint and get caught, then don’t even show up in court to face your well deserved punishment, then go driving around with expired tags, then try and break free from a group of cops exercising the legitimate warrant for your arrest - you are playing with your life and the lives of those around you.  This is not similar to Floyd’s situation.  The clerk who took Floyd’s counterfeit bill testified that it was his belief that Floyd was not even aware that his bill was counterfeit.  Floyd deserved a citation at worst.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.13  Kavika   replied to  Mark in Wyoming @1.1.9    3 weeks ago

I understand that Mark, but the protocol for the BC PD is that the officer carries it on the non-dominant side, it isn't the LEO's decision. Whether it is butt forward or backward (cross draw) is not mention so I have no idea if that is part of the protocol or if there is one on that.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.14  Kavika   replied to  Thomas @1.1.11    3 weeks ago
I am going to piss a bunch of you off right now and say that I personally believe that she intended to draw her Taser and drew her sidearm instead. 

Actually, I believe that it was an accident and nothing intentional on her part. The question that I have is did she follow protocol with the taser. Did she have it on her weak side or did she have it on the same side as her service weapon? If all protocols were followed and she still killed the guy then a long look has to be taken at the protocol and whether the use of force was justified. 

None of that information about protocol has been made available to my knowledge.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.15  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @1.1.12    3 weeks ago

I agree with you , to an extent. My question would be is someone like Daunte Wright (and his passenger) stopped disproportionately for things like an expired registration? I think they are.  Are the police quicker to use force on young black men than on other demographic groups? I think they are. 

When we get to the point when young black men are given "warnings" in traffic stops to the same extent that other groups are, instead of being processed as a potential criminal suspect, then we will be making a little progress. 

 
 
 
Snuffy
Junior Participates
1.1.16  Snuffy  replied to  Kavika @1.1.14    3 weeks ago

Looking at the video again, I could not see her as it was her police camera recording. I do see that the other officer had his tazer on his left side and his firearm on his right side.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
1.1.17  r.t..b...  replied to  Snuffy @1.1.16    3 weeks ago

Bottom line, another dead at the hands of those hired and trained to ‘serve and protect’.
Both the hiring and the training are obviously subject, especially given she was training while on this stop. 

 
 
 
gooseisgone
Senior Quiet
1.1.18  gooseisgone  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.15    3 weeks ago
When we get to the point when young black men are given "warnings" in traffic stops to the same extent that other groups are, instead of being processed as a potential criminal suspect, then we will be making a little progress. 

Either we have laws or we don't, a New Mexico Officer lost his life during a traffic stop.

New Mexico police officer shot in the head during routine stop in February, new video shows | Fox News

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
1.1.19  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.15    3 weeks ago

I won’t argue about the disproportionality.  However, I should think that this individual could not have renewed his tags with such a warrant open on him anyways.  The argument about lots of people have expired tags because of the pandemic doesn’t apply for him, assuming the car is in his name.  The fact that he’s out there pushing his luck to this extent doesn’t help his case.  Cops can exercise leniency about expired tags, but not on someone with his circumstances.  With the amount of support the media is giving this kid, you’d think the expectation is “well, I’m going to let you off this time - but make sure you get that registration taken care of, and turn yourself in to the police for that whole violent assault with a firearm thing at your earliest convenience.”

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.20  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @1.1.19    3 weeks ago

Drivers are given warnings for all sorts of violations including expired tags.  My sister just told me recently that it happened to her and she was just told to have it taken care of. They didnt run her drivers license to see if she had a warrant out for her arrest. 

Obviously once they found out Wright had a warrant on him they had to act on that information. 

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
1.1.21  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.20    3 weeks ago

My daughter had the same thing happen just the other day.  However, she said she got pulled over so instantaneously when the cop turned behind her that it had to be the result of a remote plate reader.  I think technology is at a point where police don’t need to squint at your plate anymore.  An onboard scanner reads everything within sight and tells them who has an expired tag.  It’s a computer, so it would make sense that peripheral information like warrants for the owner also automatically pop up.  From there it’s just a matter of verifying it’s the owner who is driving the car.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.22  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.15    3 weeks ago

Out of all the times I've been stopped by police, I've gotten a ticket every single time with a single exception. I don't know what it's like everywhere else and I cannot speak for anyone but myself; I'm simply stating that of the times I have been caught breaking the law, 99% of the time, I am fined [aka charged] with said crime. If I hadn't paid a ticket or gone to court, I can promise you that I'd have had a warrant and been arrested for it.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.23  Trout Giggles  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.1.22    3 weeks ago

I've been stopped 3 times for speeding. Was given a warning every time. No tickets

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.24  Ender  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.23    3 weeks ago

I have been stopped once in ten years, for speeding. Was given a warning.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.25  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.23    3 weeks ago

You're lucky. I haven't been so lucky.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.26  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Ender @1.1.24    3 weeks ago

You've been luck then too.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.27  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @1.1.24    3 weeks ago

I was stopped twice in the span of a year. Really thought I was going to get busted the last time. Both times I was in a state car. Both times I was stopped by a town cop.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.28  Trout Giggles  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.1.25    3 weeks ago

The first time I got stopped I was doing 85 in a 55. I was late for my bowling night. Anyway, Mr State Trooper pulls me over and asks if I know how fast I was going. I don't lie to cops so I said 85. He said he clocked me at 83 but thanked me for my honesty. He asked me what my hurry was and I said I was late for bowling. He rolled his eyes and said, "Now I've heard everything." Anyway, his radio squawked and he had bigger fish to fry so he left me with a warning.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.29  Ender  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.28    3 weeks ago

I told the cop I was sorry and I wasn't paying attention.  Haha

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.30  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @1.1.29    3 weeks ago

I can't wait to get pulled over in the car I'm driving now:

Me: "I was doing what???? I didn't think this car could go that fast. Make it quick, Officer, the hamster has to be starving"

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.31  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.23    3 weeks ago

I had my license for about 5-6 months when I was stopped the first time, I was 17. I was stopped for speeding on I75; he wrote me a ticket for 5 over, put under advisement, which means no points, unless I get another ticket within a year following, but I still had to pay $250. In a grey 1984 Buick Century.

I was pulled over for no seatbelt the very day it was put into MI state law that a police officer could pull you over for only that; I was hungover and driving home from a friend's house. I was on I94. That was the time the cop let me off with a warning.  In a cranberry colored 1997 Ranger. 

I was pulled over out of town [still in MI] for speeding. The ticket was written for 10 over even though I was only doing 5 over. When I called the courthouse, the woman on the other end said, "Let me guess..." not only did she name the officer, but she even concluded that I was from out of town and knew the street I was pulled over on without me saying a word. She then said, "We get a lot of complaints about him. They're building a new police department / courthouse. Even if you came back to fight it, you would lose." I asked her about the points / fines regarding 5 mph over vs. 10 mph over and she verified that they were the same, so I just paid it right then. $215 ticket. In my mother's 1997 Olds 88.

I was pulled over for turning right between 3-6pm at about 3:10 pm. Ticketed. The sign had been ran over and I had not seen it [because it was on the ground], but I was told that "ignorance of the law is no excuse" by the judge when I went to fight it. However, the person just before me, had been ticketed for parking in a handicapped parking space... third offense, was let off... he lived in that city. $250 for the ticket and another $100 for court costs. In my bright yellow 2003 Jeep Wrangler.

Pulled over for doing a rolling stop [most recent one]; he gave me a ticket for "impeding traffic" so I didn't receive points. I completely deserved it... I rolled the sign. I paid my ticket the moment I got my paycheck [three days later]. During that stop, since it's the only one that I've had since obtaining my CPL, I grabbed my booklet with my insurance and registration and set it on the seat, the window was already down, I put my hands on the steering wheel and when the officer approached, I stated, "I am a CPL holder, but I do NOT have my pistol on my person or in my car. May I grab my registration and proof of insurance"? The officer said yes. While he approached my car, he had his hand on his pistol, with the "latch" over top of it undone. After I got my info and gave it to him, he asked me if I understood why he pulled me over and I said, "Yes, I rolled that stop sign." When he came back, I took my ticket and thanked him for not giving me points. That ticket was $285. In my red 2012 Fiesta.

Oh... I almost forgot about one other that I was let off... I was 17, fell asleep at the wheel, ran a red light and when the cop saw where I worked [local McDs], he ran my plates and license, found out that I was not a troublemaker, came back and decided to follow me home to make sure I [as well as others] were safe. He did ask me if I'd been drinking since I dozed off behind the wheel though and when he didn't smell booze on me is when he ran my info. When he came through the drive thru at McDs the following week, I hooked him and his partner up with some food. In my grey 1984 Buick Century.

Never was pulled over in my red 84 Mustang with a V8. The rest had 4 cyl. except my mom's car and my Ranger, a V6.

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
1.1.32  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.1.22    3 weeks ago

Out of all the times I've been stopped by police, I've gotten a ticket every single time with a single exception. ...  I'm simply stating that of the times I have been caught breaking the law, 99% of the time, I am fined [aka charged] with said crime.

Statistically speaking, you must break the law A LOT!!!  I’m guessing your math is a little off.  You seem too nice to have gotten caught breaking the law 99 times. jrSmiley_79_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
1.1.33  Thomas  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.15    3 weeks ago
.... My question would be is someone like Daunte Wright (and his passenger) stopped disproportionately for things like an expired registration? I think they are.  Are the police quicker to use force on young black men than on other demographic groups? I think they are.  When we get to the point when young black men are given "warnings" in traffic stops to the same extent that other groups are, instead of being processed as a potential criminal suspect, then we will be making a little progress. 

I agree,.This is one of the roots of systemic racism.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.34  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @1.1.32    3 weeks ago

Nah... well, maybe driving. I wasn't caught breaking the law 99 times, I said that out of the times I have been caught breaking the law, 99% of the time, I was fined.

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
1.1.35  MrFrost  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.3    3 weeks ago

Ok, please forgive this stupid question...but are both weapons carried on the same side of the body?

Probably answered but... Per policy, the taser is supposed to be carried on the non dominant side of the body, to avoid confusion. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
1.1.36  MrFrost  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.10    3 weeks ago

The "kid" was resisting arrest...that kind of behavior usually results in bad outcomes.

That's not a crime that is punishable by death. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
1.1.37  MrFrost  replied to  gooseisgone @1.1.18    3 weeks ago
a New Mexico Officer lost his life during a traffic stop.

So that justifies a cop shooting and killing someone? 

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
1.1.38  expatingb  replied to  MrFrost @1.1.36    3 weeks ago
That's not a crime that is punishable by death. 

No it isn't.  But it sure as hell was a major contributing factor.  Additionally, the officer was likely already on heightened alert as the warrant was for prior illegal gun possession.

It was a gross accident and there is blame to go all around.   

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
1.1.39  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  MrFrost @1.1.37    3 weeks ago
a New Mexico Officer lost his life during a traffic stop.
So that justifies a cop shooting and killing someone? 

OK i am 3 bourbons and a cigar over my weekly limit here , but i will answer this real bluntly.

 if a cop is shot at during a traffic stop it most DEFINITELY justifies any cop on scene to shoot AND  kill the person.

a question i will ask of any of the vocal lickspittles debating the situation or situations being discussed on the site , Have any of you donned the uniform , gone through the training , or wore the badge AND faced the situations you are railing and wailing about? because i have . and if YOU havent , your opinon doesnt FUCKING matter as an arm chair quarterback. it tells me you dont have the BALLS. until you do you might want to consider shutting the fuck up about that which you know nothing about and cant even imagine .

 want to change it ? get the training , put on the uniform, badge and equipment and face what those you critisize do every single day day in or day out , until then what YOU have to say doesnt fucking matter to those that do until it reaches the point they say fuck you it and you are not worth it . and in todays enviroment , get use to hearing  that saying .

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
1.1.40  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.1.34    3 weeks ago

I wasn't caught breaking the law 99 times, I said that out of the times I have been caught breaking the law, 99% of the time, I was fined.

In other words, for every 100 times you got pulled over you received one warning.  If you received only one warning in your life, then you had to have been pulled over 100 times for that math to work out.  Let’s say you have only been pulled over 20 times but were let off once - then you would have received a ticket (19/20 x 100) = 95% of the time.  Sorry, engineer here.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.41  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @1.1.40    3 weeks ago

Mechanic here. Just sayin. jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

800

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.2  Tessylo  replied to  JohnRussell @1    4 weeks ago

Did anyone know that she was involved with covering up the police shooting of an autistic man two years ago?  

That she was training an officer on the day that she confused her taser with her gun????????????????????????????????

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1    4 weeks ago

At least they charged her properly. I'm expecting a conviction of 2nd degree manslaughter.  That would be justice.

 
 
 
gooseisgone
Senior Quiet
1.4  gooseisgone  replied to  JohnRussell @1    3 weeks ago
I'm not sure that is the proper response. 

What do you think the "proper" response should be when you accidentally shot someone? Mine would probably include an F bomb or the Lord's name in vain. 

 
 
 
JBB
PhD Principal
2  JBB    4 weeks ago

Negligent Homicide is still murder just less heinous.

 
 
 
gooseisgone
Senior Quiet
2.1  gooseisgone  replied to  JBB @2    3 weeks ago
Negligent Homicide is still murder just less heinous.

Just out of curiosity are you calling for the Capital Police Officer to be charged with Murder in the 2nd degree for the Jan 6th shooting.   

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
2.1.1  Tessylo  replied to  gooseisgone @2.1    3 weeks ago

"Just out of curiosity are you calling for the Capital Police Officer to be charged with Murder in the 2nd degree for the Jan 6th shooting."   

What a stupid question.  Everyone who was in the Capitol that day is lucky they weren't shot/dead.

 
 
 
gooseisgone
Senior Quiet
2.1.2  gooseisgone  replied to  Tessylo @2.1.1    3 weeks ago
What a stupid question.  Everyone who was in the Capitol that day is lucky they weren't shot/dead.

Oh of course................. they should have shot all of the 1000 plus people for being at the Capital.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
2.1.3  r.t..b...  replied to  gooseisgone @2.1.2    3 weeks ago

It is the ‘Capitol’...a PSA with no strings need be attached...

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Participates
3  Sean Treacy    4 weeks ago

That seems like the right charge. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @3    4 weeks ago

For the sake of the country she should just plead guilty and forego a trial. 

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
3.1.1  Ronin2  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1    4 weeks ago

Screw due process and her rights. Do what is expedient for a bunch of violent left wing radicals that will riot anyways because they will think she got off lite.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.1.2  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1.1    4 weeks ago

A guilty plea by her own choice is due process. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
3.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1    4 weeks ago

The country doesn't need her to plead guilty.

That is ridiculous.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
3.1.4  Ronin2  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1.2    4 weeks ago

Right. With the Democrats, media, and hard left wing radicals harassing her. Her own choice.

What a load of BS.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1.5  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1.1    4 weeks ago

You forgot to mention 'leftist brown shirts'

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1.6  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1.4    4 weeks ago

You forgot 'leftist brown shirts'

 
 
 
zuksam
Sophomore Silent
3.1.7  zuksam  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1.2    4 weeks ago
A guilty plea by her own choice is due process. 

If they offer a reasonable deal she probably would but the prosecution is more about placating the mob than pursuing justice.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
Professor Expert
4  FLYNAVY1    4 weeks ago

Plenty of errors on both sides of this equation...   Unfortunately, someone is dead because of those errors. 

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
4.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  FLYNAVY1 @4    4 weeks ago

agreed, i will say this though , a tazer is one of the last non leathal things i would want to be hit with, just because i know what its like. 

 i would rather be maced , or hit with a pepperball or even a bean bag to the chest 

I was 28 when i certified with the tazer , back then part of the certification was , you had to be hit with it so you knew what it did .

Picture 6'4" 200 pound healthy guy , the initial sting is awakening , but when the juice flowed , i involentarily sounded like chewbacca having an orgasm, started to drewl and dribble like pavlovs dog, my bladder evacuated itself involentarily as did my bowels , not to mention i was convulsing like a hooked fish that had just been landed on the dock.

 everyone reacts differently too.

 now stop laughing....

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
4.1.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @4.1    3 weeks ago

 now stop laughing....

How did you know? jrSmiley_91_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.1.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @4.1    3 weeks ago

even your bowels????

I would tell the cop to just shoot me with his real gun

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
4.1.3  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Trout Giggles @4.1.2    3 weeks ago
even your bowels????

yes

 i should add that supper the night before consisted of soft tacos and pizza, followed by beer , copious amounts of beer in the dorm.....

ever have your grandma tell you to go cut your own switch for a whoopin? kids think cutting the thinnest whippy wimpy little thing wont hurt , oh how we find out thats not the case , while doing the grandmas switch dance.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.1.4  Trout Giggles  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @4.1.3    3 weeks ago

My mother told me to go cut a switch once. I came back with the biggest branch I could carry. Never told to cut my own switch again. My brother used to come back with twigs. He was so dumb

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
4.1.5  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @4.1.1    3 weeks ago
How did you know?

because even i laugh at it remembering it all these years later. and im a dour old sour puss.

but  during the same certification , mine was not the best response . guy that came a couple students after me had pretty much the same response , didnt phase him though, he kind of figured it would happen , what embarrassed him was when he got up off the floor with help, was the HUGE erection he had that would not go away. pitched a tent for about 15 mins .

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
5  Ronin2    4 weeks ago
It was not clear what the warrant was for.

Complete and utter bullshit. The warrant was for carrying an illegal firearm; and resisting/fleeing arrest. Seems the dumbass thought he could get away a second time. Bottom line is if he didn't resist arrest and try to flee a second time he would still be alive. The dishonesty from media using this to fuel their racial crap is beyond sickening.

The nature and relevance of the charges have been subject to intense debate, and false rumors since Wright's death. Insider reviewed court documents that named Wright, one of which was a warrant for his arrest:

60771c3c74da0300181e1a65?width=700&format=jpeg&auto=webp
The April 2, 2021, warrant for Daunte Wright's arrest which police said they were acting on when an officer fatally shot Wright on April 11 when he was pulled over for a traffic

The officer will have her day in court. She is allowed due process; no matter how much the left wishes otherwise. Her chances of getting a fair trial will be about nil. Any jury/judge will worried about the reaction from left wing radicals.

The city will burn until then, maybe a long time afterwards thanks to Democrats appeasing their radical violent base for far too long. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1  Ender  replied to  Ronin2 @5    4 weeks ago

What is sickening is thinking that even if one did resist or run it should be a death sentence.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
5.1.1  Ronin2  replied to  Ender @5.1    4 weeks ago

They should have just let him go right? I mean he wouldn't have hurt anyone fleeing police; no chance what so ever.

There should be a different set of laws for African Americans and everyone else.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.2  Ender  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1.1    4 weeks ago

Again, it should not be a death sentence.

Seems you think it should be.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
5.1.3  Ronin2  replied to  Ender @5.1.2    4 weeks ago

Wrong. No where have I defending the LEO. Her gross negligence in grabbing her gun instead of a taser was a factor in his death.

Unlike the left I am not going to turn him into a martyr or saint. There was a damn good reason there was a warrant for his arrest. If he wouldn't have resisted arrest and try to flee he wouldn't be dead, period. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.4  Ender  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1.3    4 weeks ago

If the cop hadn't shot him, he wouldn't be dead. Period.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.5  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @5.1.4    4 weeks ago

If he had been obeying laws, he wouldn't have been stopped.

Period.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.6  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.5    4 weeks ago

"If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we'd all have a merry Christmas."

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
5.1.8  r.t..b...  replied to  Ender @5.1.4    4 weeks ago

So, so tired of the all too recurring incidents that share this outcome.

The only thing more tiring is the Monday morning quarterbacking weakly attempting to justify it.

It is simply unjustifiable.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.10  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @5.1.4    4 weeks ago
If the cop hadn't shot him, he wouldn't be dead. Period. "If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we'd all have a merry Christmas."
 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.11  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.10    4 weeks ago

So I take it you are another one that thinks a death penalty is justified.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.12  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @5.1.11    4 weeks ago

I don't have the time to correct every misconception you have about me.

I'll just let you assume you know it all.

Probably easier than attempting to convince of something when your mind is so set in stone. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.13  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.12    4 weeks ago

Imo deflection equals a yes...

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.14  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @5.1.13    4 weeks ago

Oh, well, if it is your opinion...............nope, still doesn't make any difference!

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.15  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.14    4 weeks ago

No it doesn't. You refuse to clear up any misconceptions.

So don't get upset when people come to conclusions.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.16  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @5.1.15    4 weeks ago
You refuse to clear up any misconceptions.

No, I simply refuse to entertain such silly assumptions from people I don't even know, and who don't know me but "think" they do.

So don't get upset when people come to conclusions.

Not upset, trying to control my laughter.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5.1.17  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.16    4 weeks ago

Deflect, deflect, deflect.

Now go ahead, I know how it bugs you, have the last word...

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.18  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @5.1.17    4 weeks ago

You made an erroneous, silly little assumption about me.

Own it.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
5.1.19  r.t..b...  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.16    4 weeks ago

So, back to the subject of the thread, is a 2nd degree murder charge warranted in the death of Mr. Wright?

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.20  Texan1211  replied to  r.t..b... @5.1.19    4 weeks ago
So, back to the subject of the thread, is a 2nd degree murder charge warranted in the death of Mr. Wright?

I don't think it is an appropriate charge, and it certainly looks like the prosecution agrees with that assessment.

2nd degree manslaughter seems right, and THAT is the charge.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
5.1.21  r.t..b...  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.20    4 weeks ago

Well then manslaughter it is. Thank you.

Why then all the posts?

Let us all agree she should be held responsible for her irresponsible actions and leave it at that...unless of course there is something, anything meaningful to add. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.1.22  Texan1211  replied to  r.t..b... @5.1.21    4 weeks ago
Well then manslaughter it is.

yes, it is in the article and even the title.

Why then all the posts?

Because that is why I come here, to voice my opinion. What do you come here for?

Let us all agree she should be held responsible for her irresponsible actions and leave it at that...unless of course there is something, anything meaningful to add. 

Sure are a whole lot of posts other than mine talking about other things. Why single mine out? To what purpose?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Participates
5.1.23  Greg Jones  replied to  Ender @5.1.2    4 weeks ago

Again, it should not be a death sentence.

That decision was made by him, perhaps making a sudden move or reaching for something?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Participates
5.1.24  Greg Jones  replied to  r.t..b... @5.1.21    4 weeks ago
Involuntary manslaughter....no jail time, since the deceased escalated the incident

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
5.1.25  Ronin2  replied to  Greg Jones @5.1.24    3 weeks ago

Underneath normal circumstances yes.

But the Democrats, media. and their their radical violent left Brown Shirts already have predetermined the outcome. Anything less that a full sentencing and they will riot. Hell, they don't need a damn excuse they are going to riot because it is a maximum 10 year sentence, 20 thousand dollar fine; or both. That is far too lite for them to accept.

Of course they are making the "victim" out to be completely innocent again. Seems that reality doesn't factor into their decisions at all.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5.1.26  Tessylo  replied to  Greg Jones @5.1.23    3 weeks ago

"Again, it should not be a death sentence."

"That decision was made by him, perhaps making a sudden move or reaching for something?"

So you're saying then that the shooting was deliberate and not an accidental 'I thought it was my taser!'?

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5.1.27  Tessylo  replied to  Greg Jones @5.1.24    3 weeks ago
Involuntary manslaughter....no jail time, since the deceased escalated the incident

jrSmiley_98_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5.1.28  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1.25    3 weeks ago

You remembered 'leftist brown shirts'!  You added 'radical violent' this time.  Don't forget to include that next time!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Good boy!

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
5.1.29  MrFrost  replied to  Greg Jones @5.1.23    3 weeks ago

That decision was made by him, perhaps making a sudden move or reaching for something?

That's like having surgery to remove your left arm, but they accidentally remove your right arm, then having the surgeon blame you for not picking a better doctor. 

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
5.2  evilgenius  replied to  Ronin2 @5    4 weeks ago
Bottom line is if he didn't resist arrest and try to flee a second time he would still be alive.

Very true. If you're not white and you don't comply one is 9 times more likely to get shot. Or sometimes like in the case of G. Floyd even if you do eventually comply you still end up dead.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.2.1  Texan1211  replied to  evilgenius @5.2    4 weeks ago
If you're not white and you don't comply one is 9 times more likely to get shot.

Where is that stat published?

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5.2.2  Tessylo  replied to  evilgenius @5.2    4 weeks ago

"Very true. If you're not white and you don't comply one is 9 times more likely to get shot. Or sometimes like in the case of G. Floyd even if you do eventually comply you still end up dead."

Yup.  Then they take the one who didn't get shot (the white guy) to Burger King because he was feeling peckish.

I wonder how long George Floyd was dead while that vermin scum killer still had his knee on Floyd's neck?

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
5.2.3  evilgenius  replied to  Texan1211 @5.2.1    4 weeks ago
Where is that stat published?

So you want to derail the conversation to specific stats rather than admit that there might be an inherent bias in policing? I'm not shocked. IF you really want to go stat hunting I'll be your huckleberry and we can go there. I'm certain it won't exonerate our LEOs and the fact of inherent bias (too often with violent results) in our systems will still be there.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
5.2.4  Texan1211  replied to  evilgenius @5.2.3    4 weeks ago
So you want to derail the conversation to specific stats rather than admit that there might be an inherent bias in policing? 

If you didn't want to discuss it, then perhaps it would have been wiser to not bring it up.

Or at least it would have been better to prove such a claim.

But hey, if suddenly you can't support your claim and now want to talk about other stuff, who am I to stop you?

 
 
 
Colour Me Free
Junior Quiet
5.2.5  Colour Me Free  replied to  evilgenius @5.2    3 weeks ago
If you're not white and you don't comply one is 9 times more likely to get shot.

2.5 to 3 times [depending on the source used] is the actual number.  Hope I did derail the conversation .. but accuracy is important, 'we' are living in a time where facts do not matter as much as they should .....

Daunte Wright should not have been 'murdered' yet he should not have tried to run .. the dumbest move by law enforcement was to say something like 'I thought it was my tazer' .. better off to say I fuck'd up and take responsibility for her action .. all law officers no matter how long they have been on the force need to be retrained in conflict resolution .. that runaway perp cannot beat a radio!  This incident takes me back to the female officer from Oklahoma that off'd Terence Crutcher  .. she was charged , but alas she walked....

Defense just rested in the Floyd murder case .. judge says he is ready to call a mistrial if states rebuttal witness mentions 'lab work' ... think the state should just rest and trust they did their job!  risking a mistrial is unacceptable .. it is scary enough that the jury could hang all by itself!

Peace evil....

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
5.2.6  evilgenius  replied to  Colour Me Free @5.2.5    3 weeks ago
2.5 to 3 times [depending on the source used] is the actual number. 

My point is that there demonstrable data to prove racial bias. I'll discuss actual data and numbers, but the other poster only wants to distract from any point that shows there is racial bias. That said, you are correct, if one is black or Native American 2.5 to 3 times depending on source. If one is latinix that number jumps to 20% more likely. It also depends on sex and age. Young men seem to be especially susceptible to being shot by a LEO. There isn't a lot of data availible to track. The Washington Post started a database a few years back to find info from news reports across the nation, but many PDs don't track their data. The city next door to where I live just announced last night they will be tracking their data now with new software.

 
 
 
Colour Me Free
Junior Quiet
5.2.7  Colour Me Free  replied to  evilgenius @5.2.6    3 weeks ago

Agreed there are a lot of factors involved .. racial bias, is complicated, yet I believe the '3 times more likely' is an accumulative number representing the various groups that make a whole .. I think most / many individuals deem themselves to be color blind, I know I once felt I was .. but honestly I have come to realize to say one is color blind is to ignore that which takes place on a daily basis in this nation.  

It is above my pay grade to deem an individual a racist .. was the officer that killed Wright a racist, was Wright killed because of the color of his skin ..?    I would like to think not ... I agree that Wright was pulled over for a petty reason, was he pulled over for driving while black?  WOW, I do not know, I know what happened was wrong, another black man gunned down by law enforcement .. Why did Daunte attempt to run?  He had a warrant that he did not want to deal with ..?  So many extenuating circumstances in this case .. Daunte certainly was not gunned down as Castile was gunned down .. now that I see as racist ... Scott in SC, Breonna Taylor .. there is a list of unarmed black men / women murdered by law enforcement where racism was most likely a factor .. as I said above was Wright killed based on the color of his skin..?

I have strong opinions that are rarely popular and I have learned to keep to myself evil

 I have been glued to the Floyd murder trial since opening arguments, I have watched a man die over an excruciating 9 minutes and 29 seconds .. I want Chauvin to get the max allowed by law, he is a dick!  ...  his 5'9 145lb lil man arrogance issue took a man's life ...  [as I see it] a macho man, most likely saying to the crowd .. 'fuck you, I am in charge' ... race aside Chauvin murdered a man in plain sight of the world, no gun necessary! 

 
 
 
Colour Me Free
Junior Quiet
5.2.8  Colour Me Free  replied to  evilgenius @5.2.6    3 weeks ago
tracking their data now with new software.

P.s... this should be a requirement .. bad officers need to be flagged so they cannot go down the road to the next police force and join up!

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
5.3  MrFrost  replied to  Ronin2 @5    3 weeks ago
Bottom line is if he didn't resist arrest and try to flee a second time he would still be alive.

Bottom line is that if Kim Porter would have tased him instead of shooting him, he would still be alive. 

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
6  Hal A. Lujah    4 weeks ago

It was not clear what the warrant was for.

I read an article earlier today that claimed to know what the warrant was for, but I won’t repeat it here in case it was misinformation (I think the source was was FOX).  However, if it is true then I would hardly call it victim blaming when someone tries to escape being taken into custody for that kind of a warrant.  There is a difference between not showing up for court on a shoplifting charge and doing so for a violent offense.  Obviously he should not have been shot with a gun, but I can understand drawing a taser for certain offenses.  I don’t understand what this kid thought he was going to get away with - he put himself in a bad position, then made an unfathomably stupid decision and subsequently became the victim of a horrible accident.  I feel bad for all involved.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
6.1  Ronin2  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @6    4 weeks ago

See post 5. The warrant isn't that damn hard to find. Failing to show up to court isn't the bad part- it was what he was charge with that he had to go to court in the first place.

Carrying an illegal firearm, resisting arrest, and evading police.

The cops should have been expecting him to resist and bolt a second time and been prepared. 

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
6.1.1  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  Ronin2 @6.1    4 weeks ago

This is one of those rare instances where you and I come to a similar conclusion.  Too often the left wants to imagine that the warrant for the black person was for something mundane, probably because so often it is.  

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
6.1.2  Tessylo  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @6.1.1    4 weeks ago
Too often the left wants to imagine that the warrant for the black person was for something mundane, probably because so often it is.  
So one instance out of how many?

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
6.1.3  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  Tessylo @6.1.2    4 weeks ago

It doesn’t matter.  Misguided knee jerk reactions only give ammunition to your political adversaries. My first question when I heard this story was what was the warrant for, not why are the cops being so unfair again.  In fact, I get a little offended when I see his aunt lashing out on tv that they murdered her nephew.  It was a horrible accident that he could have prevented himself by allowing himself to be taken in for the serious charges he was flouting.  If you or I had a warrant out for ignoring charges like his, reacting the way he did could have gotten us killed just as easily.  Imagine if they just let him run off, with the intention of catching up with him later, and he carjacked another victim to get away.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
6.1.4  Tessylo  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @6.1.3    4 weeks ago

I've said all I have to say on the matter.

 
 
 
bugsy
PhD Guide
6.1.5  bugsy  replied to  Tessylo @6.1.4    4 weeks ago

Riiiiiiiigght

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
6.1.6  Tessylo  replied to  bugsy @6.1.5    3 weeks ago

Piss off bugs

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Participates
7  Sean Treacy    4 weeks ago

This is a good explanation on what can cause an officer to mistakenly fire a gun

“It’s not like she looked at her gun and thought it was a Taser,” Smith said. “It’s a horrible, horrible motor glitch that could happen in high-stress situations. I liken it to when you get into a rental car and go to start it up, you automatically reach for what’s familiar to you before realizing that you’re not in your car. The same issue could have happened here with the Taser.”

Maria Haberfeld, who is also a John Jay professor and co-author of   “Use of Force Training in Law Enforcement: A Reality Based Approach,”   said, “People underestimate the level of stress police officers experience during traffic stops.”

“A lot of police officers get killed doing what should be routine traffic stops” and a veteran officer like Potter would be acutely aware of that, Haberfeld said. “The longer you are on the job, the more layers of stress you accumulate. And errors of judgment happen when you are under stress.”

Kenney added, “I can only assume muscle memory is what happened here.”

“There is no indication that the officer intended to use deadly force,” the professor said. “That said, it goes nowhere near excusing this mistake.”

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
7.1  Kavika   replied to  Sean Treacy @7    4 weeks ago

There are also a number of protocols regarding tasers within police departments. You carry your taser on your non dominant side. Taser on your left side if you're right-handed which is BC protocol. The feel, weight, and trigger pull are all different in a taser than an LEO weapon usually a Glock 17, 19 or 26 which is what the Brooklyn Center PD uses. Many PD's use yellow-colored tasers to add another safety feature so there is no mix-up. (not sure if the BC PD does use yellow tasers)

She is a 26-year veteran of the BC PD and a training officer. In fact, she was training a new officer the day of the shooting. 

A man is dead, that is the end result.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Participates
7.1.1  Sean Treacy  replied to  Kavika @7.1    4 weeks ago
number of protocols regarding tasers withi

Yes, I understand. 

I'm simply pointing out why experts believe this happens.  

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
7.1.2  Kavika   replied to  Sean Treacy @7.1.1    4 weeks ago
I'm simply pointing out why experts believe this happens.  

I understand that, I was adding to that with the protocols that PD was using to try and stop the mistakes. A few years back the BC PD had to undergo additional taser training when they tased a person twice and he died as a result. It results in a settlement between the BC PD and the victim's family.

 
 
 
bugsy
PhD Guide
8  bugsy    3 weeks ago

As terrible this event was, and I believe it was an accident and the guy should not have died, let;s face a little reality here.

He has a pretty long rap sheet, he was wanted for warrants and he is known to use a gun in the committing of a crime.

He was only 20.

Reality,and precedent says, that he would have ended up any of a number of ways anyway.

1. put in prison for a future felony

2. Killed by a fellow drug pusher....drug deal gone bad, or

3. Killed by the police due to a more violent action committed by him. There are, of course, more ways, but these seem to be the most popular.

Sucks to say this is not speculation, but what history shows for others with similar histories. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
8.1  Tessylo  replied to  bugsy @8    3 weeks ago

Dog whistle

 
 
 
bugsy
PhD Guide
8.1.1  bugsy  replied to  Tessylo @8.1    3 weeks ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
8.2  r.t..b...  replied to  bugsy @8    3 weeks ago

That is a lot of conjecture given a twenty-year old corpse.

He was denied even the chance to pay the price for his indiscretions, to mature, or to change his life for the better. 

A sad ending in this individual case, a societal tragedy given the cumulative.

 
 
 
bugsy
PhD Guide
8.2.1  bugsy  replied to  r.t..b... @8.2    3 weeks ago

Never said anything different. I made the observation that because of his history, precedent shows that more than likely he would end up in the morgue before he was 30.

Not conjecture...the truth,

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
8.2.2  r.t..b...  replied to  bugsy @8.2.1    3 weeks ago

And being killed by a LEO is on the list  of causes of death for a twenty year old black man. 
That that is statistically a probability and not an anomaly is beyond fucked up. 

 
 
 
bugsy
PhD Guide
8.2.3  bugsy  replied to  r.t..b... @8.2.2    3 weeks ago

Well, let's look at it this way. Young black males commit far more violent crimes per capita than any other race. The reason why being killed by an LEO is high on the list is because making stupid choices gets you stupid prizes.

What are you going to do to get those numbers down?

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
9  Tessylo    3 weeks ago

Whatever happened with this young man

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MrFrost
PhD Principal
10  MrFrost    3 weeks ago

I completely agree that Kim Porter made a mistake and it was an accident. But, it cost someone their life, she absolutely should be held accountable for it. She killed someone, it's not like a door ding in a grocery parking lot. 

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
10.1  expatingb  replied to  MrFrost @10    3 weeks ago

I'm going to surmise this was a response to my post above and answer accordingly.  If I'm in error, I apologize.

I completely agree that Kim Porter made a mistake and it was an accident.

Well we agree on that.  

But, it cost someone their life, she absolutely should be held accountable for it.

I'll even go so far as to agree to that with a caveat.  I'll propose involuntary manslaughter.  The 2nd degree is I believe an overcharge to placate the mobs descending, along with Crump on Brooklyn Center.

She killed someone, it's not like a door ding in a grocery parking lot. 

She killed someone with an arrest warrant for a gun charge.  Are you willing to put your life on the line and assume that he's not carrying another illegal gun?  

On the flip side, had he simply cooperated and not try to resist arrest, or better yet had taken care of the prior arrest warrant, I suspect tensions all around would have been lessened.

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
10.1.1  MrFrost  replied to  expatingb @10.1    3 weeks ago
She killed someone with an arrest warrant for a gun charge.

She admitted she was at fault. 

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
10.1.2  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  MrFrost @10.1.1    3 weeks ago

yes and resigned , which i why i believe this was an accident and mistake  an accident and mistake that should not have happened , but did.

 
 
 
MrFrost
PhD Principal
10.1.3  MrFrost  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @10.1.2    3 weeks ago

yes and resigned , which i why i believe this was an accident and mistake  an accident and mistake that should not have happened , but did.

That's exactly what I said. 

 
 
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