The Wealthiest Woman In The World

  

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By:  john-russell  •  3 weeks ago  •  16 comments

The Wealthiest Woman In The World
Not a word in the section on her career that would indicate why she is the wealthiest woman in the world.  To see that information we have to look elsewhere on the page

Mac Kenzie Scott is the wealthiest woman in the world.  Here is her entire career on wikipedia



Early life and career [ edit ]


MacKenzie Scott Tuttle was born on April 7, 1970, in San Francisco, California . Her father was a financial planner . [9] In 1988, she graduated from Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut . [10] Tuttle earned her bachelor's degree in English at Princeton University with highest honors in 1992. [6] She studied under writer Toni Morrison , who said Tuttle was "one of the best students I've ever had" in her creative writing classes. [9]

After graduating, she worked for D. E. Shaw , a quantitative hedge fund in New York, as a recruiter and a writer from 1992 to 1994. There, she worked for Jeff Bezos , then a senior vice-president, as a research associate . [11] MacKenzie wrote her debut novel, The Testing of Luther Albright , eleven years later in 2005 for which she won an American Book Award in 2006. Her second novel, Traps , was published in 2013.

In 2014, MacKenzie founded Bystander Revolution , an anti-bullying organization, where she serves as executive director. [12]



Thats all of it. Not a word in the section on her career that would indicate why she is the wealthiest woman in the world.  To see that information we have to look elsewhere on the page


MacKenzie was married to Jeff Bezos , founder of Amazon and Blue Origin , from 1993 to 2019.

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I hope she plans to do something outstandingly good for humanity with her 68 billion dollars , all of which she 'inherited' , via divorce. 


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JohnRussell
1  author  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago

In a sense she won the biggest lottery of all time. 

I would rather see a world where a Jeff Bezos cannot accumulate 200 billion dollars of personal fortune. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2  author  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago

MacKenzie Scott has nabbed the title of the   world's richest woman , sitting atop the U.S. billionaires list alongside her ex-husband   Jeff Bezos , who has long held the title of the world's wealthiest man.

Scott is now No. 12 on the   Bloomberg Billionaires Index , with a net worth of about $68 billion as of Thursday.

JEFF BEZOS IS WORLD’S FIRST-EVER $200 BILLION MAN

https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxbusiness.com/foxbusiness.com/content/uploads/2020/09/686/384/mackenzie-bezos-scott-2-AP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1 2x" > https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxbusiness.com/foxbusiness.com/content/uploads/2020/09/1344/756/mackenzie-bezos-scott-2-AP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1 2x" > https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxbusiness.com/foxbusiness.com/content/uploads/2020/09/1862/1046/mackenzie-bezos-scott-2-AP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1 2x" > https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxbusiness.com/foxbusiness.com/content/uploads/2020/09/1440/810/mackenzie-bezos-scott-2-AP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1 2x" > mackenzie-bezos-scott-2-AP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

MacKenzie Scott at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, California on March 4, 2018. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

The novelist went through a very public divorce from the Amazon founder and CEO, which was finalized in 2019. The separation left her with a 4% stake in the online shopping giant, or around $36 billion at the time. Since then, however, the e-commerce giant has seen exponential growth due to a surge in online orders over the course of the pandemic.

Scott previously affirmed that she would be donating a hefty amount of her wealth to charity.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/mackenzie-scott-richest-woman-world?ocid=uxbndlbing

 
 
 
Kavika
3  Kavika     3 weeks ago

Her commitment to helping others is already taking place. 

MACKENZIE SCOTT’S $20M DONATION IS A STEP TO TRANSFORM THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NATIVE AMERICANS AND THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

"I began work to complete my pledge with the belief that my life had yielded two assets that could be of particular value to others: the money these systems helped deliver to me, and a conviction that people who have experience with inequities are the ones best equipped to design solutions,"
 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Kavika @3    3 weeks ago

She needs to give away billions and billions, not 20 million.  But obviously it is a start and a boon for the NA recipients. 

 
 
 
Kavika
3.1.1  Kavika   replied to  JohnRussell @3.1    3 weeks ago
In the past year, she has donated $1.7 billion to 116 organizations working in areas of interest to her, from racial justice and LGBTQ equality to climate change and global health.

And she is continuing donations at a very fast pace. She has also signed the ''giving pledge''.

https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/21348052/mackenzie-bezos-scott-donating-billions-ex-jeff-bezos-amazon

 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1.2  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Kavika @3.1.1    3 weeks ago

okey dokey

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
3.1.3  Bob Nelson  replied to  Kavika @3.1.1    3 weeks ago

I was about to post something very snarky... ... ... but I guess I won't. 

    jrSmiley_19_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
3.1.4  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1.2    3 weeks ago
okey dokey

Regardless of how she earned/won/stumbled into her money, she is indeed a living example of philanthropic generosity.  I guarantee that  you wouldn't see this kind of thing with some of the more visible celebrities who are millionaires/billionaires. 

On a stern note:  I know where you were trying to go with this article.  Please spank yourself. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1.5  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1.4    3 weeks ago
  I know where you were trying to go with this article.  Please spank yourself. 

LOL

 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1.6  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1.4    3 weeks ago
Regardless of how she earned/won/stumbled into her money, she is indeed a living example of philanthropic generosity.  I guarantee that  you wouldn't see this kind of thing with some of the more visible celebrities who are millionaires/billionaires. 

I am willing to accept that as a fact. But she still "stumbled" into 68 billion dollars.  And only she will decide where the charity money goes. So her generosity is at the whim of her likes and dislikes. 

========================================================================

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World ...

Winners Take All   is the book I have been waiting for—the most important intervention yet regarding elite-driven solutions, a vitally important problem to expose. The book courageously answers so many of the critical questions about how, despite much good will and many good people, we struggle to achieve progress in twenty-first-century ...

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
3.1.7  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1.6    3 weeks ago
So her generosity is at the whim of her likes and dislikes. 

That's her prerogative, I suppose.  It's her $$.  

What would you do with that much money?  What would your philanthropic endeavors include?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1.8  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1.7    3 weeks ago
What would you do with that much money?  What would your philanthropic endeavors include?

Oh you know I would have to think about that. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1.9  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1.7    3 weeks ago
That's her prerogative, I suppose.  It's her $$.  

Thats actually the point.  People who support the concept of great individual wealth , billionaires say it is a good thing because most such people give millions of dollars to charity. But what if their charities are not the same "charities" that would have been served had that money instead ,say, gone to taxes which fund government programs for the needy.  

I'm not saying that MacKenzie Scott won't give her money to worthy causes, I am saying why is it up to her? 

She shouldnt have 68 billion dollars to give away. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
3.1.10  Bob Nelson  replied to  JohnRussell @3.1.9    3 weeks ago
She shouldn't have 68 billion dollars to give away. 

96

 
 
 
Tessylo
4  Tessylo    3 weeks ago

That's what I love to see.  Truly wealthy people who help others.  She's up there with Bill Gates, who donates much of his wealth to worthy causes.  More of the truly wealthy need to follow in her/their footsteps.  

 
 
 
JohnRussell
5  author  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago
https://www.npr.org/2018/08/29/642688220/generous-giving-or-phony-philanthropy-a-critique-of-well-meaning-winners

On the connection he makes between people with good intentions — who are often politically liberal — and President Trump

Giridharadas:   A lot of well-meaning liberals — and it's going to, it hurts to hear this — but a lot of well-meaning liberals paved the road for Trump. And they did so in two ways. First of all, by peddling a lot of pseudochange instead of actually fixing the American opportunity structure, instead of actually repairing the American dream over the last 30 to 40 years — by doing that, they allowed some of the biggest problems in this country to fester for decades and not be solved. And I think it's very plausible that had we actually been solving those problems of trade and education and social mobility, Donald Trump would simply not have had the oxygen that his conflagration required. But they also enabled Trump in a second way, which is: They contributed to the correct intuition, across large parts of this country, that elite Americans have rigged the game for themselves.

Inskeep:   You even take one further step and argue that President Trump is essentially a parody of the sort of philanthropist you don't like: "Trust me, I'm very rich. I'm going to fix this problem for you. Don't worry about it."

Giridharadas:   One of the most disturbing things to me in reporting this book is I started to realize that a lot of Donald Trump's language and intellectual moves, if that is not an exaggeration, actually took root in the so-called philanthro-capitalists of the last generation. So when President Trump   says   "only I can fix it," that idea doesn't start with him. That's actually something that has been pushed by these private-sector change agents for years [that] they are especially capable of solving social problems. When Donald Trump says, "Yeah, yeah, I manufactured stuff in China and Mexico, but that's going to help me figure out how to make sure that never happens again," again, that is a move that America's plutocrats have been making for a long time. "The arsonists are the best firefighters."
 
 
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