Voting rights: More than 100 bills that would restrict voting are moving through state legislatures - CNNPolitics

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  jbb  •  5 days ago  •  106 comments

By:   Kelly Mena (CNN)

Voting rights: More than 100 bills that would restrict voting are moving through state legislatures - CNNPolitics
State lawmakers across the US have filed more than 100 bills since the November election aimed at reforming election procedure and limiting voter access, according to a new report from the Brennan Center for Justice.

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(CNN) State lawmakers across the US have filed more than 100 bills since the November electionaimed at reforming election procedure and limiting voter access, according to a new report from the Brennan Center for Justice.

In all, 28 states have introduced, pre-filed or are advancing 106 restrictive bills for the 2021 legislative session, a significant spike from just 35 bills in 15 states in 2020, according to the Brennan Center analysis. The majority of bills look to restrict or put limitations on how and who can vote by mail, while others look to impose photo ID laws and take a more aggressive voter purge policy, according to the report. Their sponsors argue that the measures are necessary to restore confidence in and integrity to the voting process after it was marred by baseless allegations of voter fraud pushed by former President Donald Trump and other GOP officials, culminating with the deadly January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol. Mail-in voting was dramatically expanded in 2020 because of the pandemic as election officials and lawmakers looked to balance public health precautions with the right to vote -- and led to a dramatic shift in voter turnout, with Democrats disproportionately favoring mail-in or early voting options. Though there has been no evidence of widespread voter fraud, Republicans nationally have made election law changes a priority this year. Read More Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel has said the party will be taking a "heavy role" in pushing for the election changes. "It's going to be done at the state level. I think a lot of these states are already looking at their state laws," McDaniel said in an interview with Fox News on Monday. Opponents of the measures say that they make the voting process less secure while also limiting voter participation. "There are some politicians that are very concerned about the historic turnout that we saw in the 2020 election and are determined to put barriers in front of the ballot box to try and give themselves a job security play," Myrna Perez, director of voting rights and elections at Brennan, said in an interview with CNN on Tuesday. "There are some politicians who are trying to manipulate the rules of the game so some people can participate and some people can't," Perez added.

Rolling back 'no excuse voting'


Among the states where Republicans are leading a charge against mail-in voting is Pennsylvania, where mail-in ballots sealed President Joe Biden's victory over Trump. Lawmakers have offered three different proposals that look to eliminate so-called "no-excuse" mail voting legislation that passed in 2019 with a GOP-led legislature. Pennsylvania state Rep. Jim Gregory, a Republican co-sponsor of one of the bills, previously told CNN that the goal is to restore "integrity and trust" in the voting process. "The confusion that took place afterwards, and just the lack of faith in how things were run, is really affecting people's belief and desire to want to vote again. That is especially true in my district," he said. In Arizona -- another battleground state -- that flipped to Democrats for only the second time in more than seven decades, Republicans have introduced legislation that would repeal the state's permanent early voting list -- which allows voters to automatically receive their ballots by mail for every election. Lawmakers in Missouri are also looking to eliminate concerns aboutCovid-19as an excuse for requesting absentee ballots, while a North Dakota bill would limit who can vote by absentee ballot.

Clamping down on applications and third-party involvement


Other states like New Jersey, Texas and Washington are considering bills that would limit who can send absentee ballot applications, or how widely they can go out. In the lead-up to the November election, Texas in particular became the center of a fight over ballot mail-in ballots applications when Harris County, which includes the state's largest city of Houston, was blocked from sending out applications to all voters amid legal fight with Republicans. The GOP argued that the applications should only go to voters qualified to vote by mail. A slew of other bills being considered include measures that would restrict assistance to voters, would enhance witness requirements and would limit the options a voter has for returning their absentee ballot.

Requiring photo ID


Legislators in nearly a dozen states have introduced bills that would impose a photo ID requirement either for early in-person voting or voting by mail. Proponents of photo ID requirements argue that it prevents voter fraud, although studies of recent elections show in-person voter fraud to be rare. New Hampshire Republicans introduced a bill that would require voters to include a copy of their photo ID with their absentee ballot application and when returning their completed ballots. Similar legislation was introduced on Monday in Georgia, where Republicans split with Trump to defend the November results but have since signed on to proposed reforms. The Granite State is also considering a bill that would prevent the use of student IDs as identification for voting. Mississippi is weighing legislation that would prohibit the use of out of state drivers' licenses.

Voter purges


GOP lawmakers are also focusing on voter roll maintenance, specifically looking to remove voters from rolls for inactivity. An Arizona Republican legislator has introduced a bill that would remove voters who fail to vote in a four-year election cycle and fail to respond to a notice. Mississippi is considering a similar measure. A New Hampshire bill would allow election officials to remove voters from rolls based on data provided by other sates, a practice that has been blocked by federal courts for violating the Nation Voter Registration Act.

CNN's Dianne Gallagher contributed to this report.


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JBB
PhD Principal
1  seeder  JBB    5 days ago

Is it any wonder that the once Grand Old Party of Lincoln is now known merely as the damn gop?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  JBB @1    5 days ago

All these proposals make a lot of sense and are neither discriminatory nor racist 

Don't you want our elections to be fair and honest?

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.1  Ender  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1    5 days ago

Why does that sound like giving up freedoms for safety....

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
1.1.2  Tacos!  replied to  Ender @1.1.1    5 days ago

Like shutting down a pipeline?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
1.1.3  Greg Jones  replied to  Ender @1.1.1    5 days ago

Why does that sound like giving up freedoms for safety....

Not all residents have the legal right (freedom) to vote.

Don't you support election honesty?

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
1.1.4  Tacos!  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1    5 days ago
Don't you want our elections to be fair and honest?

Of course not. It's possible to lose a fair fight.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.5  Ender  replied to  Tacos! @1.1.2    5 days ago

Not at all the same...

If we want to go there though, I will compare to gun laws where people on the right say to stop adding more laws and restricting the right. Just use the laws in place now.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.6  Ender  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.3    5 days ago

Why do you say the elections are not secure now?

Last I read, this last election was more scrutinized and secure than most.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
1.1.7  Greg Jones  replied to  Ender @1.1.6    5 days ago

Millions disagree.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.8  Ender  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.7    5 days ago

Without proof...

 
 
 
Snuffy
Sophomore Participates
1.1.9  Snuffy  replied to  Ender @1.1.5    5 days ago
Just use the laws in place now.

Except as you well know,  not everybody / every state uses the laws in place. PA as example,  the secretary allowed late ballots to be counted when their own state laws don't allow for that. The count wasn't enough to change the end results but why did they not follow the law as written then?   

Some of the proposed I can agree with and some seems a bit much. I have no problem with voting by mail,  but it needs to be set up properly with signature verification. And the states need to be set up in advance with the infrastructure to handle the workload. I don't like voter harvesting and will never agree with it, I think that's just way too open for abuse.

I agree with a streamlined approach for voter registration. Not quite sure how to set it up to also cover the verification process but it can be worked on.

Cleaning up the voter roles is a must. There is way too much partisan politics around it but to me it just makes sense. I have a friend who moved to Las Vegas many years ago. His parents continue to get his mail-in ballot for every election. They have given up on calling it in or sending the envelope back marked that the person moved out of state,  nothing ever gets cleaned up. This has been going on for over 10 years now. 

Requiring photo ID. For myself I could go either way. I would like to see photo ID but there would need to be a logical exception process also as people lose their photo id's all the time.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Sophomore Participates
1.1.10  Snuffy  replied to  Ender @1.1.6    5 days ago
Last I read, this last election was more scrutinized and secure than most.

Don't you need to take that comment in context?  It was in response to how secure the voting was to outside (read Russian) manipulation, and they said the voting was secure and not tampered with. It was not an overall statement for the entire election.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.11  Ender  replied to  Snuffy @1.1.9    5 days ago

Some laws were changed for the election to accommodate for the pandemic, from what I gather is a states right to do. Also was a smart thing to do.

'Voter harvesting' is a vague term. I saw some republicans upset because a couple pulled up to a drop box and only one of them got out to drop off both ballots.

People are throwing fits and getting upset about ridiculous things.

nothing ever gets cleaned up

Which is where, even though I know states have most control, there should be a more national, centralized system. That would stop most of those problems. If the man voted in another state, how hard would it be for states to compare and take the person off the rolls in the other state.

It should also be done with care as I don't agree with just an overall purge. It catches to many people in a wide net.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.12  Ender  replied to  Snuffy @1.1.10    5 days ago

There have been statements that voter fraud was exceedingly rare.

 
 
 
devangelical
Masters Expert
1.1.13  devangelical  replied to  Ender @1.1.12    5 days ago

the voter fraud was so flagrant that no evidence can be found.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.14  Ender  replied to  devangelical @1.1.13    5 days ago

Well they did catch a republican, I think...

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
1.1.15  Ozzwald  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1    4 days ago
Don't you want our elections to be fair and honest?

Any evidence that they aren't that already?

 
 
 
MonsterMash
Freshman Guide
1.2  MonsterMash  replied to  JBB @1    4 days ago

It's no wonder Democrats still use a jackass as their symbol, it's more fitting now than it was when first used.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.2.1  Texan1211  replied to  MonsterMash @1.2    4 days ago

jrSmiley_12_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
1.2.2  Larry Hampton  replied to  MonsterMash @1.2    4 days ago

A male donkey known world wide for their hard work, companionship, guardianship of flocks, and stubborn persistence ——

Right on!

 
 
 
Duck Hawk
Freshman Silent
2  Duck Hawk    5 days ago

Looking at these actions makes me want to open up voting to every adult in America. Mail-in ballots to all citizens, a national holiday to allow folks to vote, mandatory time off to vote (2-3 hours). What else can we think of for unrestricted voting? Oh, and my favorite- if we are going to have more than 2 political parties then we need a constitutional amendment to allow for proportional representation in the State Houses and the House of Representatives. this allows parties that get a minimum of votes from their state to be represented in Congress. (Yes I know it would do away with direct representation, but how often does your rep. vote the way you want anyways?)

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.1  Texan1211  replied to  Duck Hawk @2    5 days ago

unless barred by law, every us citizen old enough to vote may do so now.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Sophomore Participates
2.2  Snuffy  replied to  Duck Hawk @2    5 days ago
a national holiday to allow folks to vote, mandatory time off to vote (2-3 hours).

Rather than that, I would have them move election day from Tuesday  (the reason why Tuesdays were picked is very old and no longer needed) to a Friday thru Sunday voting period. Yes it would cost the states more money to have the polling stations open for three days rather than just the one but it would allow for a greater percentage of people to be able to make it to the polls to vote without impacting their employment. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
2.2.1  Ender  replied to  Snuffy @2.2    4 days ago

I could agree with that. Have an extended voting weekend.

The only reason people could be against it, is immediate gratification.

 
 
 
Duck Hawk
Freshman Silent
2.2.2  Duck Hawk  replied to  Snuffy @2.2    4 days ago

I like that idea. Could it be implemented in States that restrict mail-in voting, by giving people more time to vote? jrSmiley_26_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Snuffy
Sophomore Participates
2.2.3  Snuffy  replied to  Duck Hawk @2.2.2    4 days ago

As states are in control of their election processes I think it would have to be set state by state to move away from Tuesday elections to weekend elections.  But the federal government can 'encourage' them to make the change. 

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.4  Ozzwald  replied to  Snuffy @2.2.3    4 days ago
As states are in control of their election processes I think it would have to be set state by state to move away from Tuesday elections to weekend elections.  But the federal government can 'encourage' them to make the change.

Hell with that, just declare any federal election day a national holiday.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.5  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.4    4 days ago

A national holiday would mean millions of Americans still working.

DO you ever go out on a national holiday? To eat? Shop? Entertainment?

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.6  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.5    4 days ago
A national holiday would mean millions of Americans still working.

But also millions more being able to vote.  Why do right wingers only see in black and white?

DO you ever go out on a national holiday? To eat? Shop? Entertainment?

What has that got to do with voting????

 
 
 
Snuffy
Sophomore Participates
2.2.7  Snuffy  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.6    4 days ago

And that's why I said to make it a three day election period.  Why does it only need to be one day?  Why can't it be spread over several days to allow more people the opportunity to vote?  

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.8  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.6    4 days ago

There is no point to or any real benefit derived by declaring Election Day a national holiday.

Well over half of Americans will still have to work, so what is accomplished by such a move?

We have early voting in the majority of states now. People have ample opportunities to vote if they want to. Some effort may be required.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.9  Ozzwald  replied to  Snuffy @2.2.7    4 days ago
And that's why I said to make it a three day election period.  Why does it only need to be one day?  Why can't it be spread over several days to allow more people the opportunity to vote?

Excellent idea.  Make 1 day a holiday so most have the opportunity, then the following 2 days for those who had to work the holiday.

Everything needs to be done to encourage as many people as possible to participate in each and every election.  

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.10  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.8    4 days ago
There is no point to or any real benefit derived by declaring Election Day a national holiday.

Enabling more people to vote is not a benefit???

Well over half of Americans will still have to work, so what is accomplished by such a move?

Another black and white viewpoint from you.

It would accomplish allowing millions more off work to be able to vote.

We have early voting in the majority of states now. People have ample opportunities to vote if they want to. Some effort may be required.

Why do you want to make it difficult for so many people to vote?  Why are you opposed to making it easier for every American to vote?

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.11  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.10    4 days ago
Enabling more people to vote is not a benefit???

I clearly said no such thing. Who is unable to vote now?

It would accomplish allowing millions more off work to be able to vote.

They can vote now. As evidenced by record turnout in 2020.

Why do you want to make it difficult for so many people to vote?  Why are you opposed to making it easier for every American to vote?

Again, clearly not something I said. It is easy to vote in America now. 

Example:

I could go to ANY polling station in the entire county, present my ID, and vote.

I had ample time to do so. The polls were open from October 13 through October 30.

I could also have gone on Election Day to any polling station in my county.

Sounds real hard and time-constrained, huh?

How much easier that THAT would satisfy you?

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.12  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.11    4 days ago
I clearly said no such thing. Who is unable to vote now?

You said there was no real benefit.  Enabling more people to vote is a real benefit.

They can vote now. As evidenced by record turnout in 2020.

And had they been off work, millions more would have been able to vote.

I could go to ANY polling station in the entire county, present my ID, and vote.

Depending on weather, COVID restrictions, health, ability to travel, and the number of polling places and their locations in your county.

I had ample time to do so. The polls were open from October 13 through October 30.

So what?  Elections are like taxes, a lot of people wait until the last minute to do it.  Why penalize them?

I could also have gone on Election Day to any polling station in my county.

Assuming you are off work and have the ability to get there, and ( often ) the time to stand in line for your turn.

Sounds real hard and time-constrained, huh?

For some people yes.

How much easier that THAT would satisfy you?

As an American I would like to see EVERYBODY given the opportunity to vote and in fact discourage them from NOT voting.

In Texas people had to be able to stand in line for hours for their Constitutional right to vote.

0d092a8f-caeb-458d-93d8-caf68ea9fe9b-AP20287663781424.jpg?width=660&height=436&fit=crop&format=pjpg&auto=webp

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.13  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.12    4 days ago
You said there was no real benefit.  Enabling more people to vote is a real benefit.

To claim that, you need to tell me who it will benefit that was unable to vote in the election. Who wasn't allowed to vote that if only we had a national holiday would be enabled?

And had they been off work, millionsmorewould have been able to vote.

You need to prove that. How many worked every single day during all voting hours? Did they live in a state that requires employers to give time off to vote?

28 states require employers to give the time off to vote. Many employers grant time off whether state laws require it or not.

Assuming you are off work and have the ability to get there, and ( often ) the time to stand in line for your turn.

I also told you that I had 17 DAYS besides election day to get to the polls. Plenty of time for anyone truly interested in voting.

So what?  Elections are like taxes, a lot of people wait until the last minute to do it.  Why penalize them?

There are currently no penalties existing anywhere in the United States for not voting in an election. 

As an American I would like to see EVERYBODY given the opportunity to vote and in fact discourage them from NOT voting.

Everybody DID have the opportunity to vote. Tell me who didn't.

In Texas people had to be able to stand in line for hours for their Constitutional right to vote.

No, they made the personal decision to wait in a line. Many, many Texans waited in line less than an hour. Personally, it took me less than 40 minutes from the time I pulled into the parking lot until I left after voting.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.14  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.13    4 days ago
To claim that, you need to tell me who it will benefit that was unable to vote in the election.

Bullshit.  Enabling even 1 more voter is a benefit, unless you do not believe in the democratic system.  Do you believe in the democratic system Texan1211?

You need to prove that.

No I don't.  It is self evident.  Or are you claiming that no additional votes would happen if it was a national holiday???

28 states require employers to give the time off to vote. Many employers grant time off whether state laws require it or not.

Whoop dee do and big fucking deal!

  22 states do not, many employers do not, and even many employers (where it is required) do not.

I also told you that I had 17 DAYS  besides   election day to get to the polls.

Well good for you.  Are you wanting to penalize anyone that waits until the last minute???

There are currently  no penalties existing anywhere in the United States   for  not  voting in an election.

Except for not being able to get to the polling place in time to cast your vote.

Texas closes hundreds of polling sites, making it harder for minorities to vote

IN TEXAS, POLLING PLACE CLOSURES, ABSENTEE BALLOT RULES MAKE IT HARDER TO VOTE

Everybody DID have the opportunity to vote. Tell me who didn't.

Take another look at the picture I provided.  Not everyone has time to wait hours to vote.

Residents report hours-long waits as early voting for the presidential election began in states across the US.

No, they made the personal decision to wait in a line.

Wrong!  They made the personal decision to go and vote.

Many, many Texans waited in line less than an hour.

And many waited for hours.

Personally, it took me less than 40 minutes from the time I pulled into the parking lot until I left after voting.

Big fucking deal!!!

Why is everything so black and white to you.

Long voting lines are okay with you as long as at least 1 person was able to bypass the line.

As long as 1 person had the time to get out there and vote, it is okay that others spend hours trying to do the same.

0*CjMerDNYlf9uvKli.png

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.15  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.14    4 days ago
Bullshit.  Enabling even 1 more voter is a benefit, unless you do not believe in the democratic system.  Do you believe in the democratic system Texan1211?

You haven't been able to prove that even one voter would benefit, or how they would benefit. Not a thing to do with believing in the democratic system. Just simple common sense--make a claim--prove it.

Except for not being able to get to the polling place in time to cast your vote.

Sounds like a personal problem to me. If one wants to vote, it is easy enough to do so.

Take another look at the picture I provided.  Not everyone has time to wait hours to vote.

Those folks in the picture chose to make time to stand in line. Not everyone has to wait in such a line.

Wrong!  They made the personal decision to go and vote.

They could have chosen to go at another time or on another day. Piss-poor planning by some don't constitute a crisis for the rest of us.

And many waited for hours.

Their choice, There were other times they could have voted, and other ways they could have voted.

Long voting lines are okay with you as long as at least 1 person was able to bypass the line.

That is a nasty little habit--telling me I said something or feel a certain way when you don't have a fucking clue about how I feel. And I can PROVE it while you CAN NOT.

It is now easier than ever before to vote in America.

All this whining that we don't make it sufficiently easy enough for some folks is nothing but bullshit.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Principal
2.2.16  Bob Nelson  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.4    4 days ago

Yes!

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.17  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.15    3 days ago
Just simple common sense--make a claim--prove it.

Common sense is that if more businesses were to close on election day, people who would normally have to work, would be able to vote at their own convenience.

Sounds like a personal problem to me. If one wants to vote, it is easy enough to do so.

For you, maybe so.  But that is not true for everyone else.

Those folks in the picture chose to make time to stand in line. Not everyone has to wait in such a line.

How many people were turned away when they saw that size of a line?

They could have chosen to go at another time or on another day.

Maybe, maybe not.  This is not true of everyone.  But once again you are black and white.

Their choice, There were other times they could have voted, and other ways they could have voted.

Again, that is not true of EVERYONE.

That is a nasty little habit--telling me I said something or feel a certain way when you don't have a fucking clue about how I feel. 

So what you say and what you feel are different.  Okay.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.18  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.17    3 days ago
Common sense is that if more businesses were to close on election day, people who would normally have to work, would be able to vote at their own convenience.

Why would you assume businesses will close because it is a holiday? Many don't now.

For you, maybe so.  But that is not true for everyone else.

It is plenty easy enough to vote in the US today. In fact, some 151 million people managed to do so just last November.

How many people were turned away when they saw that size of a line?

I have no idea if anyone was turned away. If you know differently, enlighten me with the number.

Maybe, maybe not.  This is not true of everyone.  But once again you are black and white.

I think anyone interested in voting could have figured out how to go to the polls sometime or another in 18 days of early voting or on Election Day itself. You know, if it is important to them. 

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.19  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.18    3 days ago
Why would you assume businesses will close because it is a holiday? Many don't now.

Always black and white with you.

Many won't, many will.

It is plenty easy enough to vote in the US today. In fact, some 151 million people managed to do so just last November.

And how many more would have if it had been easier for them to.  Not everyone has the time to afford going to vote.  Unless you are now going to claim that you were able to vote in 0.025 seconds.

I have no idea if anyone was turned away.

Then you don't understand human nature.  People do not like standing in lines, especially not hours long lines.  Unless you do.

I think anyone interested in voting could have figured out how to go to the polls sometime or another in 18 days of early voting or on Election Day itself.

You THINK huh?  I don't even need to go into that.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.20  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.19    3 days ago

Look, you can whine all day long that people were turned away (no evidence of that) or that many more would have voted if only the line was shorter (no evidence of that) or that the length of time allotted was insufficient for some to vote (again, no evidence).

Doesn't change the fact that over 150 million------a record turnout-----figured it all out all by themselves and managed to cast a ballot.

I guess when it is important to them, people will vote.

Others will whine and complain.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.21  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.20    3 days ago
Doesn't change the fact that over 150 million------a record turnout-----figured it all out all by themselves and managed to cast a ballot.

You feel 150 million voters is enough, so why try to get more.

Whereas most people, who believe in the Democratic process, feel 100% is enough, any less and the process is not working to its fullest potential.

You are happy with less than half the people voting, that's not true democracy.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.22  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.21    3 days ago
You feel 150 million voters is enough, so why try to get more.

FFS, dude, stop trying to tell me what I think or feel.

I wish every American eligible to vote would do so. My point is that it simply can't be as onerous as you want me to think it is to vote when 150 MILLION can manage to figure out how to do so.

Whereas most people, who believe in the Democratic process, feel 100% is enough, any less and the process is not working to its fullest potential.

And many who do believe in the democratic process feel as it is easy enough to vote for those who make just a little effort.

100% is an admirable goal, but in reality, unless you force people to vote, it won't happen.

You are happy with less than half the people voting, that's not true democracy.

Please stop trying to tell me what I feel. You don't have a clue.

And for the record, more than half of eligible voters did vote in 2020. Get your facts straight.

Voter turnout in 2020 election: U.S. has record turnout - Washington Post

Fact check: Over 159 million people voted in US general election (usatoday.com)

Federal Register :: Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2019

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.23  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.22    3 days ago
FFS, dude, stop trying to tell me what I think or feel.

Then speak more clearly.  That is what your statements are implying.

I wish every American eligible to vote would do so.

Yet you have stated over and over that you are unwilling to take any steps to make your wish come true.

My point is that it simply can't be as onerous as you want me to think it is to vote when 150 MILLION can manage to figure out how to do so.

Your point is meaningless.  If it is onerous for even 1 single person who wants to vote, the process can be improved.

And many who do believe in the democratic process feel as it is easy enough to vote for those who make just a little effort.

And there it is again.  "EASY ENOUGH" in YOUR opinion. 

It needs to be as EASY AS POSSIBLE for EVERYONE, EVERYWHERE.  It is NOT easy for everyone.

100% is an admirable goal, but in reality, unless you force people to vote, it won't happen.

Especially not if you don't even try.

Please stop trying to tell me what I feel. You don't have a clue.

Then speak more clearly, all I have to go on are your statements.

And for the record, more than half of eligible voters did vote in 2020. Get your facts straight.

I see what you did there.  You changed my claim of total Americans to eligible voters.  Not very honest of you.

Voted 159,000,000 

Population = 328.200,000

Roughly 48.4% of the population voted

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.24  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.23    3 days ago
Then speak more clearly. 

I did, loudly and clearly. Not my problem if someone doesn't understand what I wrote and needs to think I implied something other than what I wrote.

I see what you did there.  You changed my claim of total Americans to eligible voters.  Not very honest of you.

Voted 159,000,000 

Population = 328.200,000

Roughly 48.4% of the population voted

Since many in YOUR figures are not eligible to vote, why count them?

To say that people not eligible to vote didn't vote is rather stupid.

OMG, change the law so a baby can vote!!!

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.25  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.24    3 days ago
Since many in YOUR figures are not eligible to vote, why count them?

I was speaking general population.  Many who are not eligible to vote, simply have not registered.

To say that people not eligible to vote didn't vote is rather stupid.

Not really, like I mentioned, many have simply not registered.

OMG, change the law so a baby can vote!!!

[removed]

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.26  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.25    3 days ago
I was speaking general population.  Many who are not eligible to vote, simply have not registered.

Makes logical sense that if someone isn't eligible to vote, they would not register to vote.

Not really, like I mentioned, many have simply not registered.

Well, then, they should register and vote. What stopped them from registering?

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.27  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.26    3 days ago
Makes logical sense that if someone isn't eligible to vote, they would not register to vote.

Makes more logical sense that if they haven't registered to vote, they are then not eligible.  But keep spinning.

Well, then, they should register and vote. What stopped them from registering?

Don't know, don't care.  But as I have said, they should be encouraged to register, AND encouraged to vote.  Voting (and registering) should be made as simple and quick as is possible.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.28  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.27    3 days ago

you are assuming that people who don't bother to register want to register. nothing stopping them from doing so.

registering is easy.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.29  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.28    3 days ago
you are assuming that people who don't bother to register want to register.

No, YOU are assuming that if they haven't registered they will never want to. 

I am saying that if they haven't registered they should be encouraged, and allowed to even at the last minute .

nothing stopping them from doing so.

Nothing is encouraging them to either.  

registering is easy.

In some states, not as easy in others.

images-7.jpeg?fit=640%2C480&ssl=1

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.30  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.29    3 days ago

I think one state doesn't require registration at all, and 5 states allow election day registration.

I believe you can register in states at any time during business hours.

not too hard to do.

if people want to, they can.

some personal effort may be required

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.31  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.29    3 days ago

please regale me with a tall tale about how hard it is to register, and do name where it us.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.32  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.31    2 days ago
please regale me with a tall tale about how hard it is to register, and do name where it us.

Once again, it might be easy for you but not so easy for others.

It is still not BLACK AND WHITE.

People have other things to deal with and think about, than voting.  Then election day comes up, and they discover that they are concerned about something being brought up.  Now it is the last minute, they have to deal with children and possibly multiple jobs, and have difficulty getting into register, or even dealing with the line to vote.

You have people who haven't ever driven a car, so have no ID.

You have college students without a local ID.

You have the elderly with no transportation. 

You have the sick, stuck in a hospital or at home.

You have the poor with no way to get to the needed locations.

You have the homeless.

All have the Constitution right to vote, but who need help in order to be able to vote.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.33  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.32    2 days ago

Everyone should have an ID. Common-fucking-sense.

You need one to get a job, to drive, to open a bank account, etc.

There are places to get IDs in every state. States will give you one for free for voting purposes if you can't afford one.

Poor planning on the part of some folks shouldn't warrant wholesale changes for all. 

Excuses are a-plenty, but SOME personal effort IS required. 

I suggest all those who say it is hard to register actually attempt to do it before whining about how difficult it is.

You can download, fill in, and mail the National Mail Voter Registration Form. All states except New Hampshire and Wyoming accept it. If you need the form mailed to you, contact your state or local election office. Many states also have their own form, which you can access from their voter registration web page.

Visit   Vote.gov   to register to vote. Depending on your state’s voter registration rules, the site can help you:

  • Register online. This is available for   40 states plus the District of Columbia .
  • Download the   National Mail Voter Registration Form . You can fill it out onscreen and print the completed form, or print the blank form and fill it out by hand. Remember to sign the form before mailing it to the location listed for your state.
  • Find guidance for states and territories with different registration

Stop peeing on my leg and telling me its raining.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
2.2.34  Tessylo  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.32    2 days ago

Requiring an ID to vote is voter suppression, plain and simple.  

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.35  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.32    2 days ago
You have people who haven't ever driven a car, so have no ID.

People don't need to drive to get an ID. States will issue an ID for identification purposes and will issue one for voting purposes.

You have college students without a local ID.

They could register in their home states then. Easy.

You have the elderly with no transportation. 

There are organizations which exist to help the elderly. The majority of elderly have IDs anyways, or can obtain one.

You have the sick, stuck in a hospital or at home.

Seems like they should register by mail then. Easy.

You have the poor with no way to get to the needed locations.

Again, registering by mail would be a good option for them.

You have the homeless.

There are places and organizations willing to help them register to vote.

All have the Constitution right to vote, but who need help in order to be able to vote

Yes, they do. And help is available for those who choose to take advantage of that help. 

Again, personal effort may be necessary.

SCOTUS has declared that states may require ID.

Therefore it is the law in many states.

IDs to vote are free.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Principal
2.2.36  Bob Nelson  replied to  Tessylo @2.2.34    2 days ago

ID... and all the others... are not a problem if voters can meet them fairly easily. That's the test. If it's an obstacle course, then it's voter suppression.

 
 
 
Duck Hawk
Freshman Silent
2.2.37  Duck Hawk  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.9    2 days ago

I like that idea!!!

 
 
 
Duck Hawk
Freshman Silent
2.2.38  Duck Hawk  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.33    2 days ago

SHOW me what state will give you a free ID for voting? Your post talks about registering to vote not actually voting.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Sophomore Participates
2.2.39  Snuffy  replied to  Duck Hawk @2.2.38    2 days ago

It's not Georgia, but in Alabama here's the process to get free photo ID thru the mail.  Don't even have to go into a government office.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.40  Texan1211  replied to  Duck Hawk @2.2.38    2 days ago

I just looked up for GA. Maybe you could simply Google the info for your state. I know Texas dies also. I believe you will find out that almost All states requiring I'd provide them.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.41  Texan1211  replied to  Duck Hawk @2.2.38    2 days ago

How to Get a Free Photo Voter ID Card | Alabama Secretary ...

...

Voter ID | Georgia Department of Driver Services

How many more do you need me to provide you with, or can you just Google some more all on your own?
 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Principal
2.2.42  Bob Nelson  replied to  Duck Hawk @2.2.38    2 days ago

Good point. Voter ID can be a form of poll tax.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.43  Texan1211  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.2.42    2 days ago

Not if it is provided for free.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
2.2.44  Tacos!  replied to  Duck Hawk @2.2.38    2 days ago
SHOW me what state will give you a free ID for voting?

Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Wisconsin are said to have the most strict ID requirements for voting. Most offer an ID card for voting free of charge, and a couple have provisions for waiving the fee that they do have.

Most states charge a very nominal fee for a generic state ID - on the order of 20 bucks, more or less. Several states have fee waivers for various reasons, like being elderly or homeless. The McKinney-Vento Act of 1987 provides federal money to states to help them provide ID cards for homeless people.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.45  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.33    2 days ago
Everyone should have an ID.

Why???

You need one to get a job, to drive, to open a bank account, etc.

So what?

There are places to get IDs in every state. States will give you one for free for voting purposes if you can't afford one.

How do you get there?

Poor planning on the part of some folks shouldn't warrant wholesale changes for all. 

So poor planning, you feel, is justification to take away someone's Constitutional right to vote?

Excuses are a-plenty, but SOME personal effort IS required.

So what?

I suggest all those who say it is hard to register actually attempt to do it before whining about how difficult it is.

Since you say it is so simple, I suggest you go and register in all 50 states to prove your claim.  You made the claim, you need to prove it.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.46  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.45    yesterday

why should people have ID?

Ask a serious question.

How do you get there?

bus, train, car, feet.

no one's right to vote us being taken away. once again. you make a claim you can't support with evidence.

mail in a voter registration form-- I even supplied you a link earlier on how to get one

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.2.47  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.46    yesterday
why should people have ID? Ask a serious question.

A person is retired, doesn't drive, has no need for an ID.

A poor person doesn't own a car, doesn't have money for a bank account, doesn't have a job, why would they need an ID?

How do you get there? bus, train, car, feet.

Too far to walk, who's going to pay for the bus ticket or cab fare?

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.2.48  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.2.47    yesterday
A person is retired, doesn't drive, has no need for an ID.

That person may wish to travel by plane.

They might want to open a new bank account.

They will need a bank account to collect SS.

A poor person doesn't own a car, doesn't have money for a bank account, doesn't have a job, why would they need an ID?

To obtain a job--something they probably need of they are poor AND unemployed.

Too far to walk, who's going to pay for the bus ticket or cab fare?

There are organizations which give rides for free so people may get to the polls.

There is also voting by mail.

If one truly wishes to vote, there exists plenty of help for them to do so. Some effort may be required on their part.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
3  Thrawn 31    5 days ago

Gotta love that commitment to democracy and its foundational principle of allowing the citizens to have a say in their government. 

The GOP really seems to hate the idea of people voting at all.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Senior Participates
3.1  r.t..b...  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    5 days ago

Say what you will about trumpism fracturing the party... the concerted, deliberate effort to restrict the right to vote in their own self-interest will become their ultimate epitaph. 

 
 
 
devangelical
Masters Expert
3.1.1  devangelical  replied to  r.t..b... @3.1    5 days ago

voter suppression has been a cornerstone of conservative values for over 2 centuries.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.1.2  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @3.1.1    4 days ago

Well, the "attempts" at "voter suppression" must have failed miserably, because 2020 saw a record number of voters.

Even higher than when Obama was first elected.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Senior Participates
3.1.3  r.t..b...  replied to  Texan1211 @3.1.2    4 days ago

Hence the need to blame the process rather than address the substance that led to losing the presidency, the house, and the senate. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.1.4  Texan1211  replied to  r.t..b... @3.1.3    4 days ago

My point is that the myth of widespread voter suppression is false, just like the myth of widespread voter fraud is false.

According to some, the GOP has always tried to suppress voters, which is just blatantly false.

And yet, we have more days to vote, more ways to vote, more places to vote, and more information to vote than we ever have had.

Hey, maybe THAT is why we have had better turnouts recently.

One thing I always find funny is when someone tells me "Democrats win when voters turnout", which would suggest that if only they get off their asses, the Democrats would win every election. But we know that isn't true.

Elections run in cycles. Rarely does one election cycle--even for the losing side--result in any significant changes for the losing party.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
PhD Guide
3.1.5  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Texan1211 @3.1.4    4 days ago
My point is that the myth of widespread voter suppression is false, just like the myth of widespread voter fraud is false.

Widespread voter fraud is most definitely false as there has been zero evidence of it. However, widespread voter suppression is obvious as this seed points out the slew of 106 new attempts at restricting voting almost all coming from conservatives who know they almost always lose when more Americans vote.

According to some, the GOP has always tried to suppress voters, which is just blatantly false.

I don't believe the GOP has "always tried to suppress voters", that's been a trend they started just within the last few decades since they gained control of virtually every Southern State and are now primarily made up of white Southern conservative Christians who are the ones who historically have "always tried to suppress voters", especially ones of color. That's why they were caught red handed just three years ago when North Carolina Republicans requested data on voting patterns by race and, with that data in hand, drafted a law that would "target African-Americans with almost surgical precision," the court said.

Ever since the voting rights act was gutted by conservative justices Republicans have been trying to use their control of State legislatures to restrict minority voters they know tend to vote Democrat. It's not a myth, it's a fact. They use the myth of voter fraud to claim they need these new onerous laws to protect the election process but in reality they are simply trying to protect their control of their States and the government as they see the diversity in America growing and threatening their control.

we have more days to vote, more ways to vote, more places to vote, and more information to vote than we ever have had

We do now in direct response to the attempts by Republicans to restrict voting in many places.

maybe THAT is why we have had better turnouts recently

We've had better turnouts because the previous Republican administration was so bad millions of Americans who don't normally turn out and normally lack interest in politics felt this was the most important election of their lives as they couldn't imagine another four years of such utter embarrassment.

One thing I always find funny is when someone tells me "Democrats win when voters turnout", which would suggest that if only they get off their asses, the Democrats would win every election. But we know that isn't true.

Do we? The people who in the past don't turn out for elections are often young or minorities or both, often because they are disinterested in politics and don't feel like their vote counts or matters, and those groups often vote Democrat. If those groups would regularly participate I believe we would see the majority of elections won by Democrats in all but the deepest Red counties and States.

 
 
 
gooseisgone
Senior Quiet
3.1.6  gooseisgone  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @3.1.5    3 days ago
However, widespread voter suppression is obvious

Is voter suppression requiring a Photo I D, if so  please provide a list of people who don't have a photo I D and the state won't provide them one for free. 

Is it voter suppression taking Dead people off the roles?

Is it voter suppression taking people off the roles who have moved?

Is it voter suppression requiring a chain of custody for a ballot? 

Is voter suppression checking to see if the person is a US Citizen if voting in a Federal Election?

Is it voter suppression to verify if the person is a registered voter and their signature matches what's on file. 

You noticed what the narrative was this year there are cases of fraud, but not enough to make a difference.  What is it that you're upset about? Are Democrat voters to lazy to make sure they are properly registered BEFORE election day.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
3.1.7  Tessylo  replied to  gooseisgone @3.1.6    3 days ago

You ask a lot of stupid questions and demand a lot of proof.  Do your own homework.  

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.2  Texan1211  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    4 days ago
The GOP really seems to hate the idea of people voting at all.

Preposterous.

made-up.

False.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
4  Ender    5 days ago

If I can't win, neither will the other guy...

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
5  Greg Jones    5 days ago

The GOP really seems to hate the idea of people voting at all.

The Dems really seem to hate the idea of not being able to game the system and cheat

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1  Thrawn 31  replied to  Greg Jones @5    5 days ago

Prove the fraud [removed]

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
5.1.1  Tacos!  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1    5 days ago

Alternatively, prove that election regulations are actually suppressing votes [removed]

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1.2  Thrawn 31  replied to  Tacos! @5.1.1    5 days ago

Limiting the voting window, making it more difficult to register, limiting voting locations and drop boxes etc. all will obviously have the net effect of fewer people voting.

You don’t have to be brilliant to understand that the more hoops you make people jump through to do something, the fewer people will do it.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
5.1.3  Greg Jones  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.2    5 days ago

have the net effect of fewer people voting.

If people really want to legally vote, the laws in most states give them ample time and opportunity

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
5.1.4  Tacos!  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.2    5 days ago
You don’t have to be brilliant to understand that the more hoops you make people jump through to do something, the fewer people will do it.

I understand that intuitively, that might seem natural, but plenty of countries have voting on a single day, or just a couple of days, and they have very high voter turnout - often exceeding ours. They also require ID and somehow it doesn't collapse the system.

I want it to be easy for people to vote, but it can't just be "anything goes." If we really take these things seriously, we should be willing to examine methods of making elections more trustworthy.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
5.1.5  Texan1211  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.2    5 days ago
Limiting the voting window,

So, how many days, weeks or months would suffice?

making it more difficult to register,

Ever hear of the Motor Voter Law?

Fact is that most states have early voting.

ALL states have Election Day voting, with the exception of Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington and Utah, which conduct elections by mail. 

In one state, you don't even have to register to vote in federal elections.

In 5 other states, election day registration is allowed.

In 2012, about 87% of citizens of voting age were registered to vote.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1.6  Thrawn 31  replied to  Tacos! @5.1.4    4 days ago

Okay, so what is SO flawed about our current system(s) that it is in vital need of reform? What aspect has been so, PROVABLY, compromised that decisive action is needed? 

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
5.1.7  Tacos!  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.6    4 days ago
what is SO flawed about our current system

It's not reliable. It's not trusted. Too many games are played. Every cycle, somebody invents a new way to register, a new way to vote. The idea that Voter ID is controversial strikes me as insane.

Election day becomes Election week or Election Month or Election Summer. It changes so much, nobody knows what's right.

And we're just supposed to trust it all because why? The gubmint say so?

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1.8  Thrawn 31  replied to  Tacos! @5.1.7    4 days ago
It's not reliable.

Based on...?

It's not trusted.

Cuz you all keep saying it can't be trusted. If I keep telling you your wife is a whore over and over, at some point you are going to start to wonder. 

Too many games are played.

Games are fun. Had another round of Cards Against Humanity a couple nights ago, tons of fun. 

Every cycle, somebody invents a new way to register, a new way to vote.

Examples? 

The idea that Voter ID is controversial strikes me as insane.

If it is automatically issued and sent to every American with a legit SS number then okay. But I seem to remember that being an idea and Republicans being sent into labor pains over a "GOVT ID".

Election day becomes Election week or Election Month

I am okay with that. As long as votes are submitted by a certain date, who gives a damn if they are put in a week, two weeks, or a month in advance?

And we're just supposed to trust it all because why? The gubmint say so?

Cuz you cannot provide evidence of fraud. And apparently neither can the "gubmint" when controlled by your hero.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
5.1.9  Tacos!  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.8    4 days ago
Cuz you all keep saying it can't be trusted.

Did you not see all the people storming the Capitol? Have you not heard about all the court cases contesting the way elections are run? And I'm not even just talking about Trump this fall. It went on all year.

And before that, it went on two years ago. Democrats are still saying that Stacey Abrams had the governor race in Georgia stolen from her.

And before that, every time there is an election.

Bush v Gore in 2000. For the next 8 years, people said Bush wasn't the properly elected president. 

It has been going on for too long and it's not just one part of the political spectrum. People don't trust our elections. That's just a fact.

Examples?

There are many. I hate to be that guy, but dinner approaches. Just Google "new voting method" and you'll see lots of examples. You can do the same for "voter registration" or voting dates. It changes constantly, and each time is accompanied by the promise that they finally got it right. Except it is done a thousand different ways across the country.

But I seem to remember that being an idea and Republicans being sent into labor pains over a "GOVT ID".

I can't worry about what the parties do. If you mean that Clinton thing, I actually thought that was a smart idea. Personally, I have always been amazed that no one asks for my ID when I vote. I always bring with it me, too.

when controlled by your hero.

You have no clue who my heroes might be.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
5.1.10  Tessylo  replied to  Tacos! @5.1.7    3 days ago
"what is SO flawed about our current system"

"It's not reliable. It's not trusted. Too many games are played. Every cycle, somebody invents a new way to register, a new way to vote. The idea that Voter ID is controversial strikes me as insane.

Election day becomes Election week or Election Month or Election Summer. It changes so much, nobody knows what's right.

And we're just supposed to trust it all because why? The gubmint say so?"

What a bunch of made up nonsense, gobbledygook 

It was reliable and trusted until the former occupant of the White House and his mob came along and said that it wasn't

 
 
 
Duck Hawk
Freshman Silent
5.1.11  Duck Hawk  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1.5    2 days ago
Ever hear of the Motor Voter Law?

Gee Tex, that only applies to voter registration not actually voting. Oh and show me where you can vote in any Texas county. I'd like you to link the law Plz, because (to my knowledge) in any state you can only vote in the county in which you reside. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
5.1.12  Texan1211  replied to  Duck Hawk @5.1.11    2 days ago

Well, he and I were discussing how easy it is to register to vote.

I also claimed rightfully that I could vote st any polling station in my county. Don't know where you read otherwise, but you probably should read it again.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
5.2  Tacos!  replied to  Greg Jones @5    5 days ago

Right? Like what are they afraid of?

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
6  Tacos!    5 days ago

Election regulation does not equal voter suppression. Other countries have more regulation than we do and they get higher turnout. Our current potpourri of lightly regulated election systems is producing chaos and mistrust. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Principal
7  Bob Nelson    5 days ago

Good seed

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
8  Buzz of the Orient    5 days ago

If Americans really wanted an end to their chaotic patchwork of voting laws and regulations and wanted to make sure there is no fraud, or hanging chads, or fixed voting machines, then just emulate Canada - paper ballots and pencils UNIVERSALLY USED and observers throughout the process from every Party that wishes to post one at every voting and counting location.   But unfortunately "universal' like in "universal health care" is a dirty word to American conservatives.  If the Republicans really want to do everything they can to make sure they maintain absolute control, then maybe they shouldn't be so critical of countries that succeed at it. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Principal
8.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @8    4 days ago
paper ballots and pencils UNIVERSALLY USED and observers throughout the process from every Party that wishes to post one at every voting and counting location. 

France, too. Fast and efficient.

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
8.2  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @8    4 days ago

Hi Buzz, I vote absentee ballot and have for years. I like having the ballot for a few days before I need to return it. (here in AZ our ballots are Loong..) I think we had around 40 different offices to vote for last election here. on one ballot. 

Having all the numerous offices and numerous candidates running and to be voted on all at one time having my ballot gives me time to research all the little candidates that are running for all the little offices on our ballots. Everything from state treasurer to public works offices and many many judgeships. 

If not for time to research the numerous candidates for the numerous public elected officials positions to be filled its no wonder so many people just vote straight party line.

Letting in the worst right along with the best. 

I like having the time to vote responsibly.

 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
8.2.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @8.2    4 days ago

Would you still qualify for an absentee ballot if the conservatives make the changes they are requesting?

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
8.2.2  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @8.2.1    4 days ago

I don't know what the requests are yet Buzz. Actually I doubt even though we have a republican governor here in AZ that our absentee ballots would be changed.

Even Governor Ducey stated a while back he endorses our absentee ballot system.

Arizona has has mass absentee voting for many years though and it is widely accepted as normal and secure. 

lol One of the good things about living in Hell.... 

Absentee ballots. lol

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
8.3  Greg Jones  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @8    4 days ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
freepress
Freshman Silent
9  freepress    3 days ago

Republicans who love the private sector should just stop running for office and stop trying to "govern". They have campaigned on trying to suppress the vote, rather than govern with policies that people actually want. They ARE the government they claim to hate.

If right wing voters who love to tout their version of a map depicting a "red" republican country, then why are they so angry?

Why do they hate the actual government they elected?

Republicans obviously don't like the jobs they have since every talking point they spew indicates they don't want their jobs.

If the private sector solves everything, what are they doing even wasting time on getting elected? Only to get elected due to extreme gerrymandering and still stir up distrust against the very government office they themselves hold.

 
 
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