Waukesha parade suspect charged with 5 counts of homicide; prosecutors announce 6th death

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  2 weeks ago  •  21 comments

By:   Tim Fitzsimons

Waukesha parade suspect charged with 5 counts of homicide; prosecutors announce 6th death
Darrell Brooks was arrested and accused of driving an SUV into crowds at the Christmas parade in Wisconsin.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Darrell Brooks, the  Wisconsin man who was arrested  and accused of driving   an SUV into crowds at the   Waukesha Christmas parade Sunday, was charged Tuesday with five counts of first-degree intentional homicide.

Prosecutors said that a sixth person, a minor, was confirmed to have died Tuesday and that another intentional homicide charge is expected to be added within a week.


Brooks, 39, is accused of driving a maroon SUV directly through the parade as it proceeded down Main Street, striking people and a float, police said Sunday night.

Six people were killed, and over 40 others were injured.

In over a decade before the incident,   Brooks had accrued an extensive criminal record , with arrests for sexual abuse, cannabis possession, battery and domestic abuse, according to records.

Brooks’ record, which was reviewed at his hearing, factored into the decision to set cash bail at $5 million with extensive conditions.

"It's extraordinarily high, but it's an extraordinarily big case," said Waukesha County Court Commissioner Kevin M. Costello.

Waukesha County District Attorney Susan L. Opper said: "There's a long history of flights, obstruction, bail-jumping-type behavior, your honor. It's remarkable that these are violations all around the state of Wisconsin."







Brooks sat hunched over, rocking in his seat and apparently crying, as Costello read the charges.







Brooks had posted $1,000 bail on Nov. 11 to secure his freedom less than a week after he was charged with resisting or obstructing an officer, jumping bail, recklessly endangering safety, disorderly conduct and battery, which were connected to domestic abuse allegations.



Police said Sunday that they had been called to respond to a domestic disturbance involving Brooks and a knife before they were redirected to the parade route.

Brooks is alleged to have fled the domestic disturbance in the maroon SUV and then driven through the parade.

“Was there an initial complaint of a knife being involved? Yes,”   Police Chief Daniel Thompson said Sunday . “Do we know if there actually was one there? We don’t know, because we didn’t even make it there. We ended up immediately responding to the crisis.”

Prosecutors in Wisconsin admitted Monday that they had asked for "inappropriately" low bail for Brooks on charges related to domestic abuse allegations.

Doorbell camera video recorded less than a mile from the parade route, which was   obtained Tuesday by NBC News , shows the moments before Brooks was arrested.

Brooks can be seen begging a resident of the home, Daniel Rider, for help , saying that he was waiting for an Uber ride and that he was homeless. After police arrived, Brooks was arrested.

Brooks is due back in court Jan. 14.


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zuksam
Junior Silent
1  zuksam    2 weeks ago

I've always said never trust a person with tattoos on their face and neck, they are prone to making Bad Decisions.

 
 
 
Nowhere Man
Junior Participates
2  Nowhere Man    2 weeks ago

Well some fool of an attorney is going to take his case and recommend that he plead Not-Guilty and of course waive speedy trial which is pretty much automatic nowadays...

The video evidence is overwhelming.... He's going to be found guilty of that there is no doubt... So why suffer the mind numbing slowness of a trial? To make some attorney rich? To make some DA famous?

He can have his day in court, plead guilty and proceed to immediate sentencing ... 

Wisconsin abolished the death penalty in 1853 and has had only one execution in 1851 since becoming a state in 1848...

The last poll to ask the citizens the capital punishment question had 55.5% of voters approving it.... But the legislature has taken no steps towards enacting one...

If there was ever a case for it, this is it...

 
 
 
zuksam
Junior Silent
2.1  zuksam  replied to  Nowhere Man @2    2 weeks ago

Let's hope he gets Life plus 500 years.

 
 
 
Sunshine
PhD Guide
2.1.1  Sunshine  replied to  zuksam @2.1    2 weeks ago

He may get the same treatment Dahmer did.  No loss there either.

 
 
 
Gordy327
Professor Principal
2.2  Gordy327  replied to  Nowhere Man @2    2 weeks ago

No matter how guilty someone is, our system allows them their day & trial in court. Pleading guilty would certainly save time.

 
 
 
Kathleen
Professor Principal
3  Kathleen    2 weeks ago

This is what happens when you let these repeat offenders out of jail all the time.

Sickening.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Junior Quiet
3.1  Snuffy  replied to  Kathleen @3    2 weeks ago

Will there be any repercussions for DA's and judges who let him out with such low bail values that he was able to be out of jail to do this?  Probably not. But there really does need to be a complete review of the process and stop setting such low bail amounts for violent crimes just because the person is a minority ( which is what I believe happened here). 

I have no issue with very low or no bail for some people who have not been accused of a violent crime, do not have a criminal history and who are financially challenged. But this requires the DA office actually do it's job rather than just rely on the word of the accused in this. This individual should never have been out of jail to do this because of the outstanding warrant in Nevada. But the DA's office did not do it's job. IMO they are just as culpable as the accused.

 
 
 
Kathleen
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Kathleen  replied to  Snuffy @3.1    2 weeks ago

I do agree...

 
 
 
JaneDoe
Sophomore Silent
3.1.2  JaneDoe  replied to  Snuffy @3.1    2 weeks ago
IMO they are just as culpable as the accused.

I hold the same opinion. Maybe if there were repercussions for their leniency they wouldn’t make such stupid decisions. 
Then you have some who realize their decision to set low bail could result in innocent deaths but don’t really care.

In an interview with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the year he was elected, Chisholm said: “Is there going to be an individual I divert, or I put into treatment program, who’s going to go out and kill somebody?”

“You bet. Guaranteed. It’s guaranteed to happen. It does not invalidate the overall approach.”

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.3  CB   replied to  Snuffy @3.1    2 weeks ago
But there really does need to be a complete review of the process and stop setting such low bail amounts for violent crimes just because the person is a minority ( which is what I believe happened here). 

Just reading through the thread and. . . this stands out: "Just because. . .  ."  Wow, so being a minority is sufficient to get one a low bail amount? Nothing else 'at play' there? Or, is this an opportunistic 'take-down while Black'? Here a perspective from the other side:

How should we set bail? The system isn't working

It needs fixing to make sure minorities aren’t locked up in greater numbers just because they can’t afford to pay bail.

But it also needs fixing to pay close attention to each case and decide accordingly based on several factors, including risk to society.

We must balance ensuring that people aren’t needlessly in jail on bails that they can’t pay while ensuring that bail is set high enough to keep potentially dangerous people locked up.

Cash bail favors the rich , who can pay it and go home, while poorer people are frequently forced to remain in jail while they await trial,” Seema Jayachandran, an economics professor at Northwestern University, argued in The New York Times.

Data show too many poor people often remain locked up because they can’t afford to pay bail. That’s real. And so, we must not let this horrific crime derail discussions and the work many are doing to reform the criminal justice system.

Brooks’ financial situation wasn’t immediately clear, but records show he was in and out of jail. And he happens to be Black. And he happens to be part of the system that too many say disproportionally keeps minorities locked up.

Again, this isn’t about excusing him. Letting Brooks go free on just $1,000 is, in retrospect, incredibly low and inappropriate.

That shouldn’t mean, though, that we should stop thinking on how best to reform the bail system.

T o be clear, I am sadden beyond belief at these injuries and losses of life. I am upset that a foolish and mental man has done this stupid, regrettable, and grave set of things. Yet, keeping it 'real' this one sick man is not representative of any other Black or minority who harms no one or others less.

We can all understand the 'smart ones' among us that can talk the legs off a table in discussion and 'psyche out a judge and jury' with charisma or end up relatively safe in an asylum ward away from hardcore prisoners just desserts . Similarly, we license 'smart ones' to police us—they use the job and position to become our dirty cops and many, many, lives are taken before they are taken out, fired, or age out.

Criminal is criminal.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Junior Quiet
3.1.4  Snuffy  replied to  CB @3.1.3    2 weeks ago
Just reading through the thread and. . . this stands out: "Just because. . .  ."  Wow, so being a minority is sufficient to get one a low bail amount? Nothing else 'at play' there? Or, is this an opportunistic 'take-down while Black'?

I'm not making this a racist thing.  The DA in question has stated in the past that poverty should not be criminalized. Looking simply at the numbers,  minorities are more likely to be living in poverty. Yes there are poor people in all races but minorities have a greater chance of it than whites, that's simple numbers. And this DA has made statements in the past where he has mixed poverty and minorities as well.

In this one case I believe that the DA did use Brook's race as a factor in determining the bail amount.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.5  CB   replied to  Snuffy @3.1.4    2 weeks ago
Yes there are poor people in all races but minorities have a greater chance of it than whites, that's simple numbers.

And that poverty is due to systemic setbacks by guess who? The White majority since the founding. So the 'fix' is to lower bail for minorities so that EQUITY can be achieved.  Had this sick man not done this twisted and freakish thing, he would be 'home' today having a nice holiday. He did this, not because of being Black or possibly impoverished.

And yes, Blacks and minorities have a 'proper' criminal element within their ranks too. This man has dishonored himself in the community, by killing its citizens. I have nothing positive to say about him. He disgusts me at first impression. Afterwards, I am struck speechless at his committed crime last week.

Mostly, some factoids are not conducive to good discussion (about him) so why bring them up (and out)?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
3.1.6  Greg Jones  replied to  CB @3.1.5    2 weeks ago

This guy had an extensive violent history. Being coddled because he's black directly led to this massacre.

mrz112421dAPR20211124054508.jpg

 
 
 
Snuffy
Junior Quiet
3.1.7  Snuffy  replied to  CB @3.1.5    2 weeks ago
So the 'fix' is to lower bail for minorities so that EQUITY can be achieved.  Had this sick man not done this twisted and freakish thing, he would be 'home' today having a nice holiday. He did this, not because of being Black or possibly impoverished.

No, absolutely not. The "fix" is to lower bail where the crime is non-violent, where the offender is not a repeat offender, where the offender is not a felon.  This sick man was out on a $1000 bail for another violent crime where he was accused of running over the mother of his child. He also has a long rap sheet, has an outstanding warrant from Nevada and has two other open felony complaints against him in WI.  Had the DA and the judge not screwed up by not doing their due diligence and setting his bail so low, this sick man would not have had the opportunity to do the 'twisted and freakish' thing and there are 6 dead and I forget how many injured who would be home today having a nice holiday.

Yes I agree that minorities have a greater chance of being in poverty and that is due to a lot of things but high on that list is the systemic setbacks by whites. I'm all for correcting those issues and helping to provide more opportunity for minorities, but lets not go so overboard that we create other problems while trying to fix a problem. I don't believe you can use EQUITY in this because it's not just about poverty, but the level of the crime that was committed, the potential for flight, etc.  

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.8  CB   replied to  Greg Jones @3.1.6    2 weeks ago

Prove this individual killer was coddled by the system and your assertion that it directly led to this massacre.  Please proceed. . . .

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.9  CB   replied to  Snuffy @3.1.7    2 weeks ago

I can agree with the overall meaning of your comment.  I don't know why the bail was set so low, for running over someone. (What justification was offered and accepted at the bail hearing?) Lots of questions.

When courts are right they are right and when they are wrong they're wrong. And, courts, are not perfect. Through hook, crook, and (dumb) luck defendants can gain the system.

We are clear, I hope, that his "blackness" was not the get out of jail free card. All to often, blackness, especially for males, is used to 'lock 'em' up' and throw away the key!

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
4  JohnRussell    2 weeks ago

Jackson Sparks, of Mukwonago, was marching in the parade Sunday with the Waukesha Blazers baseball team, Fox6 reported.

A n 8-year-old child who has become the sixth person to have died in the Waukesha Christmas parade attack is being remembered by the baseball team he was marching with as a "sweet, talented boy who was a joy to coach." 

Jackson Sparks, who underwent brain surgery on Sunday night, died from his injuries on Tuesday, according to a GoFundMe page set up for his family. Sparks, who was marching alongside his 12-year-old brother, Tucker, were one of three sets of siblings to have been injured in the attack.    

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"This afternoon, our dear Jackson has sadly succumbed to his injuries and passed away," read a post on the page, adding that "Tucker, by the grace of God is miraculously recovering from his injuries and will be discharged home." 

The page earlier described the siblings’ parents, Aaron and Sheri, as "people of faith", and that Tucker "sustained road rash and a fractured skull." 

"Please know that they appreciate your continued prayers and tremendous outpouring of support for their family," it also said. "They do however ask for privacy at this time to allow Tucker to continue to heal physically and their family to heal and mourn the tremendous loss of their sweet little boy who is now under the care of Jesus." 

"Jackson was a sweet, talented boy who was a joy to coach.  He was an awesome utility player and played on the Blazers Wolfpack team," the president of the team, Jeff Rogers,   posted on Facebook . "Jackson was tender-hearted with a contagious smile. He was the little guy on the team that everyone supported. You couldn’t help but love him." 

The Mukwonago Area School District also told   Fox6   that it is "is heartbroken over the loss of lives in the Waukesha Christmas Parade tragedy. 

"Sadly, we lost one of our students today," it added. "We are honoring the family's request for privacy and ask others do the same... Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and our community." 

The suspect in the attack, Darrell Brooks, currently faces five counts of first-degree intentional homicide and faces a mandatory life sentence if he is convicted.  

Charges relating to Sparks’ death and the more than 60 injuries caused by the attack will be announced soon, the Associated Press reported, citing Waukesha County District Attorney Susan Opper. 

Waukesha Christmas parade attack: Jackson Sparks, 8, remembered as ‘sweet, talented boy’ (msn.com)

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
4.1  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @4    2 weeks ago

There's a long history of flights, obstruction, bail-jumping-type behavior, your honor. It's remarkable that these are violations all around the state of Wisconsin

And yet last week the Soros DA let him out for pittance.  I wonder how he sleeps. 

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
4.1.1  CB   replied to  Sean Treacy @4.1    2 weeks ago

Sean, Sean, Sean, without changing the subject, I wonder how someone as conservative as you go about selecting what is/who is worthy of shame and punishment for attitudes and crimes against their fellow citizenry.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
4.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  CB @4.1.1    2 weeks ago

stg112421dAPR20211123044507.jpg

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
4.1.3  CB   replied to  Greg Jones @4.1.2    2 weeks ago

Stupid, pointless, meme. What else you got that I can consider? (Nice drawings, nevertheless!)

 
 
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