Pence adviser explains why fixing democracy may be impossible: ‘We're in greater danger today than Jan. 6’

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  john-russell  •  one week ago  •  11 comments

Pence adviser explains why fixing democracy may be impossible: ‘We're in greater danger today than Jan. 6’
"Well, the five-alarm fire has been going off continuously since Jan. 6," Luttig told Kristol. "That's why I am very concerned about where the country is today. In my view, we haven't even begun to address the problems and, as I said, as of this moment, I believe there's a complete unwillingness to address the problems."

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



www.msn.com   /en-us/news/opinion/pence-adviser-explains-why-fixing-democracy-may-be-impossible-we-re-in-greater-danger-today-than-jan-6/ar-AAXeV6Q

Pence adviser explains why fixing democracy may be impossible: ‘We're in greater danger today than Jan. 6’


2-3 minutes   Invalid Date



By Travis Gettys

A   former judge   who has been considered for the U.S. Supreme Court by Republican presidents believes political polarization may make the task of repairing democracy impossible.

Michael Luttig, who advised former vice president Mike Pence to resist Donald Trump's pressure to overturn his election loss,   spoke with The Bulwark's Bill Kristol   about the ongoing   threat   those corrupt efforts continue to pose to constitutional democracy, and he revealed why he's less optimistic about the future.

"Well, the five-alarm fire has been going off continuously since Jan. 6," Luttig told Kristol. "That's why I am very concerned about where the country is today. In my view, we haven't even begun to address the problems and, as I said, as of this moment, I believe there's a complete unwillingness to address the problems."

The House select committee is expected to make recommended changes to the Electoral Count Act, which has some embedded ambiguities some Trump allies tried to exploit to nullify the election results, but Luttig is concerned that political polarization may prevent meaningful reform.

"The country is now completely politicized and politically polarized, that there’s a natural unwillingness for any of the players who can address the problems, to address them, in fact," Luttig said.

"Because of this frightening politicization of everything and of American society, and the complete polarization of our politics, I believe that we are in greater danger today than we were on Jan. 6," he added. "The reaction has been just the opposite of what it ought to have been. Namely, we have a complete denial of the 2020 election. We have a denial of the significance of Jan. 6 for our country, and we have a continued war going on now over America over its institutions of democracy."



Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
[]
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one week ago

Judge Luttig on the War for Democracy

In his   latest video conversation,   our colleague Bill Kristol sits down with former U.S. Circuit judge and SCOTUS short-lister Michael Luttig to discuss the extraordinary role that the judge played in advising Mike Pence to resist President Trump’s pressure to overturn the election results.

Some key excerpts:

On when he realized the efforts to overturn the election in 2020 posed a grave threat

I believed initially that all of this was just a bunch of kooks. Sidney Powell, people like that; and Giuliani. I was concerned about it, because if you have those people around the President of the United States of America, and they are bent on overturning an election, it’s a consequential thing. But, I guess probably my subconscious belief and hope was that because these were the people behind it, it was destined to fail of necessity. It wasn’t until much later when I began to understand that there were seriously intelligent people involved in the effort, that I began to appreciate the real gravity of the situation.

On helping Vice President Pence to resist President Trump’s pressure not to certify the election results January 6

I was working with [Pence’s] staff, in particular Mark Short, through Richard Cullen. Never the vice president personally until after January 6th. But there was no question in my mind, but that the vice president had made his decision. I didn’t know or believe this at the time, but he was marshaling as much support nationally as he could for what he had decided he must do.

On whether we have shored up our institutions since 2020

Well, the five-alarm fire has been going off continuously since January 6th.... That's why I am very concerned about where the country is today. In my view, we haven't even begun to address the problems. And as I said, as of this moment, I believe there's a complete unwillingness to address the problems. . . . Look, it's really important to show that we can come to some agreement on at least partial fixes [to the Electoral Count Act]….

We haven’t even begun [to do the necessary work]. The country is now completely politicized and politically polarized, that there’s a natural unwillingness for any of the players who can address the problems, to address them in fact.

What we experienced on January 6th was a full scale assault on our institutions of democracy, and the instrumentalities of our democracy. The former being literally our tripartite system of government and each part of that triumvirate of institutions. And by instrumentalities, I mean the constitution and laws that constitute the bulwark of our democracy. 

And so, because of this frightening politicization of everything and of American society, and the complete polarization of our politics, I believe that we are in greater danger today than we were on January 6th. The reaction has been just the opposite of what it ought to have been. Namely, we have a complete denial of the 2020 election. We have a denial of the significance of January 6th for our country. And we have a continued war going on now over America over its institutions of democracy.

On the lack of leadership in protecting the integrity of our electoral system

Not one national leader with the moral authority, conviction, courage, and the willingness has spoken out and called to stop all of this nonsense. [I refer] to a leader with the moral authority first that can speak to the country and have the country listen. Not one leader in America has spoken out, frankly, for the past six years.
 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
2  Buzz of the Orient    one week ago

jrSmiley_81_smiley_image.gifjrSmiley_13_smiley_image.gif

When the politicization and polarization has grown to the extent that restaurants ban customers who differ in their political views, and family celebrations require banning political discussions because they can become violent if not permanently tear families apart, people just might come to the realization that "Something is rotten in the [United States of America]".  (with apologies to William Shakespeare)

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2    one week ago

I think that a lot of Americans (although I dont really have a percentage to put on it) are in denial about how serious the political problems in the country are. The divisiveness and bitterness is not going to just go away. It will take some sort of reckoning. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
2.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1    one week ago

The voters will give their opinion and who they blame this coming election day.

 
 
 
bbl-1
Professor Quiet
2.1.2  bbl-1  replied to  Greg Jones @2.1.1    one week ago

You may be correct.  After all, apparently the Nazis were elected, right?  Sometimes the voters make poor choices.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
2.1.3  Ronin2  replied to  bbl-1 @2.1.2    one week ago

They certainly did by giving Brandon and the Democrats power. A very, very, very poor choice that we will be paying for generations it seems.

 
 
 
bbl-1
Professor Quiet
2.1.4  bbl-1  replied to  Ronin2 @2.1.3    one week ago

When there's nowhere to go---just repeat the trope, right?

You pro Putin?

 
 
 
bbl-1
Professor Quiet
3  bbl-1    one week ago

Democracy or autocracy?  That is the choice?

If the Putin Regime goes down, it is extremely probable that the autocratic movements in the US and Europe will implode.  In that event Hungary and Belarus will collapse.  The Saudi Kingdom will scramble to make 'new deals'.  And China will recalibrate if they wish to continue in the World Markets.

The Western democracies have an opportunity.  I suggest they do not squander it.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
3.1  Ronin2  replied to  bbl-1 @3    one week ago
Democracy or autocracy?  That is the choice?

Six of one half dozen of the other. Those on the left don't comprehend the meaning of the word autocracy it seems.

If the Putin Regime goes down, it is extremely probable that the autocratic movements in the US and Europe will implode. n that event Hungary and Belarus will collapse.  The Saudi Kingdom will scramble to make 'new deals'.  And China will recalibrate if they wish to continue in the World Markets.

Damn, China must really have the left buffaloed. It is the #1 autocracy in the world right now; and the leftists and Dems worship it. China will continue to do what it has always done; make the West look stupid in trade and development of resources outside of it's country. 

The Western democracies have an opportunity.  I suggest they do not squander it.

Even if that opportunity ends in nuclear holocaust. Or the left's most fervent dream the US becoming China.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1    one week ago

LOL.  Be afraid, Ronin2, be very afraid.

 
 
 
bbl-1
Professor Quiet
3.1.2  bbl-1  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1    one week ago

Sure.  You pro Putin.

 
 

Who is online

Im Not Here
Drinker of the Wry
arkpdx
1stwarrior


41 visitors