Queen's Platinum Jubilee kicks off in Britain to honor Elizabeth II

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  4 weeks ago  •  63 comments

By:   Alexander Smith, Yuliya Talmazan and Leila Sackur (NBC News)

Queen's Platinum Jubilee kicks off in Britain to honor Elizabeth II
Queen Elizabeth's Platinum Jubilee celebrations began with Trooping the Color and royals greeting massive crowds from the Buckingham Palace balcony.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



LONDON — Royal Air Force planes screaming through the skies, a military band on horseback, a ceremonial Irish wolfhound named Seamus.

Queen Elizabeth II's Platinum Jubilee kicked off Thursday with all the grandeur one would expect from this 1,000-year-old institution. But despite the lavish royal pageantry, there was only one star of the show for the flag-waving crowds lining the streets of the British capital on this warm June day.

There were doubts about how much of the country's four-day celebration its 96-year-old queen would manage to attend. On Thursday, she was greeted with rapturous cheers and applause as she made two smiling appearances on the famed Buckingham Palace balcony.

"I wouldn't describe myself as particularly patriotic, but I do love the queen," said Rob Gemson, 31, an information technology manager from Manchester, a city in northwest England, who joined thousands of spectators watching the day's proceedings on big screens in a nearby park. "Seventy years on the throne — nobody else has ever done that before, so it does feel very historic."

Even for Britons usually ambivalent about the royals, many see this as an occasion to enjoy getting through the worst of the Covid-19 pandemic. Others are mindful of the queen's age and her recent health troubles — acutely aware there will be a finite number of these events left to celebrate the only monarch most have ever known.

And celebrate they did.

Thousands bearing Union Jack hats and masks of the queen gathered along the Mall, the wide avenue that links Buckingham Palace to the city, with die-hard royalists camping out days before to secure their spots.

The sheer size of the crowds meant that many missed the queen's two brief appearances. "She is 96, we should cut her a bit of slack," said Paul Clifton, a radiographer from Staffordshire in England, as he stood near Buckingham Palace in a Union Jack-themed suit and black top hat. "It's just so busy. This is the busiest we have seen it in years."

Clifton, 35, and his friend Louise D'Costa, who lives in London, arrived early and managed to get a front-row spot along the parade route. They came for the "pomp and ceremony" of it all, he said, but also to enjoy the atmosphere of people from around the country and the world able to come together after two difficult years.

Crowds packed central London for a glimpse of the royal family as they appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace.Aaron Chown / Pool via AP

While some traveled all the way from the United States, Canada and elsewhere to honor the queen, messages also poured in from world leaders and other figures, including Pope Francis. President Joe Biden paid tribute to the queen's "selfless devotion and service," while former President Barack Obama noted her "grace and generosity" and said her life had been a "gift" not just to the United Kingdom, but also to the world.

Thursday is the start of a long weekend and public holiday to celebrate the queen's 70-year reign.

After dark, more than 1,500 beacons will be lighted across Britain and overseas to cap the opening day of events. On Friday, there will be a service of thanksgiving at St. Paul's Cathedral. Saturday will see a concert at the palace, and Sunday will feature nationwide street parties before the events close with the Platinum Jubilee Pageant, a four-part festival of celebrity-packed music and theater.

In a break with tradition, the jubilee began with younger royal generations taking center stage.

First, Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, and her three children, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis, were whisked past the crowds in a horse-drawn carriage. Then, Prince Charles, Prince William and Princess Anne arrived on horseback to inspect the regiments involved in Trooping the Color, a military parade that has been held for more than 260 years to mark the monarch's ceremonial summer birthday.

When the queen finally did appear, she seemed to take spectators and even broadcasters by surprise with an understated entrance onto the Buckingham Palace balcony.

She came out wearing a light blue hat and coat adorned with a brooch, as well as her now ever-present walking stick, necessary because of her "episodic mobility problems," according to the palace. The queen, later reappeared with a pair of sunglasses, joined on the balcony by Charles, his wife, Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, William and Kate and their three children — the youngest of whom stole a little of the limelight for himself.

tdy_news_8a_cobiella_royals_jubilee_louis_balcony_sr_220602_3-lh28wm.jpg

They weren't the only ones to watch the flypast by the Royal Air Force.

Communities across London and southeast England felt their houses shake as a line of helicopters, World War II-era Spitfires and high-tech jets tore low under the fluffy summer clouds — the display culminating in a red, white and blue vapor trail and fighter jets spelling out a large "70" over the capital.

It was one of many unions of the past, present and future employed to mark an occasion that also offered a chance for the country to take stock.

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, performed a special flypast over the Buckingham Palace balcony in London on Thursday.Paul Ellis / WPA Pool via Getty Images

"When we saw the queen coming out on the balcony, it was the same as it's always been, yet really, really different," royal commentator Daisy McAndrew told NBC News. "This was a new Trooping the Color, which showed her increasing age," she said, "but there was still continuity, and I thought it was a really clever way that they changed the event to suit her."

Not everyone was on the balcony, however. Absent was the queen's grandson Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, as well as Charles' brother Prince Andrew — a reminder of the scandals that had buffeted the royals in the buildup to this celebration of its much-loved figurehead.

In a written message to mark the occasion, the queen urged her country to "look to the future with confidence and enthusiasm."

On Thursday, that enthusiasm was centered squarely on her.

"We absolutely love the queen," said Jenny Parris, 50, who was with her sister, Carol, who had flown in from South Africa just for the occasion. Both were wearing rubber masks of the queen's face and carrying around a toy corgi, the queen's favorite dog breed.

"This is our history, this is part of our national pride," Parris added. "A platinum jubilee is something that the next few generations won't see in their lifetimes."


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sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1  sandy-2021492    4 weeks ago

That pic of Prince Louis is adorable.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
1.1  Ender  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    4 weeks ago

To think he is going to end up bald one day.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @1.1    4 weeks ago

Baldness is passed through the maternal line actually

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.1.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.1    4 weeks ago

I thought I remembered that being the case, but wasn't sure.  My son has a rude awakening coming his way.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
1.1.3  Ender  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.1    4 weeks ago

They all are though. Charles is as is his two sons. Even Harry is bald now.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.4  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @1.1.3    4 weeks ago

Very true

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Participates
1.1.5  Freefaller  replied to  Ender @1.1.3    3 weeks ago

No guarantees though my brother inherited the maternal line baldness however at only 2 yrs younger I still have a full head of thick hair (although it is curly if I let it grow)

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.1.6  sandy-2021492  replied to  Freefaller @1.1.5    3 weeks ago

My son has it coming from both sides.  His dad's hairline is receding pretty rapidly.  My dad is nearly bald, and my brother is thinning on top quite a bit.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
Professor Guide
1.1.7  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.1    3 weeks ago

Ron Howard, his brother Clint, and their father are good examples of this.  All three began balding at an early age.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    4 weeks ago

I thought that was the older boy, Prince George. He looked like that at that age

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.2.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.2    4 weeks ago

Can you believe George is 8 now?

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.2.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1.2.1    4 weeks ago

They grow up way too fast

All 3 of those kids are cute as buttons

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
2  Buzz of the Orient    4 weeks ago

She's my queen, and I'm her Q.C., but if Charles doesn't abdicate in favour of William when she dies I'm casting my vote for Canada to become a republic. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
2.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2    4 weeks ago

As I understand it, if and when William becomes King, Kate will become Queen Consort.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
2.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Greg Jones @2.1    4 weeks ago

Yes, she will be the Queen Consort and her title will be Queen Catherine.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
2.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2    4 weeks ago

So Canada is still part of the Commonwealth?

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
2.2.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Trout Giggles @2.2    4 weeks ago

Yes it is.  Our Governor General, who is the local representative of the Queen for Canada is a First Nations (Native Canadian) member.  Each province also has a representative of the Queen, known as a Lieutenant Governor.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
3  devangelical    4 weeks ago

happy PJ queen. now name a successor, preferably from one of your grandsons, and get off the throne before they carry you off feet first.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
3.1  pat wilson  replied to  devangelical @3    4 weeks ago

The whole monarchy institution should be dumped. They cost the taxpayers of the UK around 345 million a year. For what ?

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  pat wilson @3.1    4 weeks ago

They have had a monarchy for over a thousand years. If it's what the British want who are we to say they should dump it. The royals do act as representatives of the Kingdom when they go abroad.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
3.1.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  pat wilson @3.1    4 weeks ago

I think that tourist ticket and merchandise sales alone bring in 100 million pounds.  Seems to me that continuation or not is a British citizen issue.  

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3.1.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  pat wilson @3.1    4 weeks ago

You know who wanted to dump the monarchy? Margaret Thatcher. I don't see you as a Margaret Thatcher

 
 
 
Hallux
Sophomore Principal
3.1.4  Hallux  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @3.1.2    4 weeks ago
I think that tourist ticket and merchandise sales alone bring in 100 million pounds.

1.776 billion pounds in 2017 at a cost of 41.9 million pounds. Sounds like a good trade.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
3.1.5  pat wilson  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.3    4 weeks ago

I think it would take a lot more than my opinion of the monarchy for me to be "a Margaret Thatcher" lol.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
3.1.6  pat wilson  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @3.1.2    4 weeks ago
Seems to me that continuation or not is a British citizen issue.  

Of course but we're all entitled to our opinions, no ?

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3.1.7  Trout Giggles  replied to  pat wilson @3.1.5    4 weeks ago

LOL! For starters you would have to be a whole lot meaner.

 
 
 
mocowgirl
Professor Quiet
3.1.8  mocowgirl  replied to  pat wilson @3.1.5    4 weeks ago
I think it would take a lot more than my opinion of the monarchy for me to be "a Margaret Thatcher" lol.

I agree.

In today's news.....

WATCH: Police issue CCTV of two men attacking Margaret Thatcher statue in Grantham | Daily Mail Online

Police release CCTV of two hooded suspects after £300,000 Margaret Thatcher statue in her home town was vandalised with red paint and communist symbol

  • The 10 foot high sculpture of Margaret Thatcher has been attacked several times
  • The £300,000 work has been erected in the late PM's hometown of Grantham
  • Footage shows two masked men approaching the statue last Saturday 
  • Council officials installed CCTV at the site to mitigate risk of vandalism  
 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
3.1.9  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  pat wilson @3.1.6    4 weeks ago

Absolutely, I did the same. 

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
3.1.10  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Hallux @3.1.4    4 weeks ago

I paid for my ticket to The Tower of London and the Crown Jewels three times over 30 years as I visited London with three different people.  

Also enjoyed

  • Windsor Castle
  • Westminster Abbey 
  • Edinburgh Castle
  • Palace of Holyrioodhouse

but only one time each.  That said, I’m not a big fan, I don’t watch the weddings or read the gossip.  I did however get invited once as a military visitor to watch Trooping  the Color at Horse Guards Parade in Whitehall - very impressive.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  devangelical @3    4 weeks ago

I don't think she will ever abdicate. But I do think she will name William as her heir.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
3.2.1  devangelical  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.2    4 weeks ago

maybe she's trying to outlive her useless son chuck.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
3.2.2  TᵢG  replied to  devangelical @3.2.1    4 weeks ago

Would not surprise me a bit.

 
 
 
MonsterMash
Sophomore Participates
3.2.3  MonsterMash  replied to  devangelical @3.2.1    3 weeks ago
maybe she's trying to outlive her useless son chuck.
Prince Charles is also known as Prince Chump.
 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
3.3  TᵢG  replied to  devangelical @3    4 weeks ago

The queen does not have the power to name her successor;   Charles is next unless he dies.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
3.3.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  TᵢG @3.3    4 weeks ago

Yeah, I thought the line of succession was established by Parliament.  It wasn't too long ago that they did away with primogeniture, making the eldest child of either sex the next heir.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
3.3.2  devangelical  replied to  TᵢG @3.3    4 weeks ago

thanks for the correction, I've probably watched too much game of thrones...

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
3.3.3  sandy-2021492  replied to  devangelical @3.3.2    4 weeks ago

In the past, the monarch could name his or her successor, but not anymore.  But the monarch naming the successor frequently led to war, so it's been better to leave it up to Parliament than to the whims of a father's favoritism.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
3.3.4  Ender  replied to  devangelical @3.3.2    4 weeks ago

You know, after all that, after all the wars, deaths, they did not let the true king come to throne.

I always thought that was odd. Instead Bran? Came out of left field for me.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3.3.5  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @3.3.4    4 weeks ago

Didn't matter. Tyrion was the one with all the power...The Hand of the King

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
3.3.6  devangelical  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.3.5    3 weeks ago

meh, a horndog with defective DNA fits in with the rest of the monarchies lines of succession...

 
 
 
Gulliver
Freshman Guide
4  Gulliver    4 weeks ago

I'm in the John Oliver school of thought when it comes to the Royal Family and the King/Queen of the UK: It should not exist and it should not be subsidized by taxpayers

The institution serves to anchor English Supremacy and by extension White Supremacy and social inequality in Britain. Nobody should support such a beast with their tax dollars.

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Freshman Quiet
4.1  afrayedknot  replied to  Gulliver @4    4 weeks ago

Tend to agree given my ‘colonialist’ bias.

But you must admit nobody does ‘pomp and circumstance’ like the Brits. It is their bailiwick and they wear it well. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Gulliver @4    4 weeks ago

If the Brits want to do away with the monarchy then ok. But as an American I don't feel I have the right to an opinion on this.

 
 
 
Gulliver
Freshman Guide
4.2.1  Gulliver  replied to  Trout Giggles @4.2    4 weeks ago
But as an American I don't feel I have the right to an opinion on this.

Our nation was founded with an opinion on this. The line, "All men are created equal," was a rejection of British monarchy.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.2  Ender  replied to  Trout Giggles @4.2    4 weeks ago

Off with their heads!

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.3  Ender  replied to  Gulliver @4.2.1    4 weeks ago

I guess we should be happy we were not a penal colony like our Aussie brethren.

Or did they get that mixed up and send the criminals here. Kinda seems like it some times.

 
 
 
Gulliver
Freshman Guide
4.2.4  Gulliver  replied to  Ender @4.2.3    4 weeks ago
Or did they get that mixed up and send the criminals here.

They certainly sent the bootleggers, smugglers, and crooked lawyers here.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
4.2.5  sandy-2021492  replied to  Ender @4.2.3    4 weeks ago

There were criminals sent here from Sweden.  Some were my ancestors.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.6  Ender  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.2.5    4 weeks ago

The only things I know I have in me are German and Irish.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.2.7  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @4.2.3    4 weeks ago

Georgia started off as a penal colony

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.2.8  Trout Giggles  replied to  Gulliver @4.2.1    4 weeks ago

Yes, and I am glad that our forefathers rejected the British style of government. I'm not British so c'est la vie

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.9  Ender  replied to  Trout Giggles @4.2.7    4 weeks ago

That could explain the love of peaches...

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
4.2.10  sandy-2021492  replied to  Ender @4.2.6    4 weeks ago

I'm mostly English and Scottish, but there's some Irish, German, Swedish, French and Italian there, too, if Ancestry.com is right.  And according to my grandma, some Native American, but I've never been able to find that in the family tree.

But the Swedish criminals who were sent here donated the land for the founding of Philadelphia, so I guess they reformed themselves after they were deported.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.11  Ender  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.2.10    4 weeks ago

On my Maternal side, My Great Grandmother came directly from Germany. Came in through NY. It was my Grandfather that was Irish.

My Father was adopted and never wanted to know about that part of him. Never wanted to talk about it. His adoptive parents were straight from Germany as well. The only thing I know from my Dad's side was his original last name. Well, he was a twin and they were adopted together so I do have an Uncle from that side. Supposedly they had an older sister that was adopted separately. He never even wanted to look her up.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.12  Ender  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.2.10    4 weeks ago

I actually don't remember learning about a New Sweden colony. Interesting.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.2.13  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @4.2.12    4 weeks ago

I do believe there was one in PA in the eastern part of the state

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
4.2.14  sandy-2021492  replied to  Ender @4.2.12    4 weeks ago

When I was working on my genealogy, I learned a lot of history I'd never known before, including about New Sweden.

 
 
 
Waykwabu
Freshman Quiet
4.3  Waykwabu  replied to  Gulliver @4    3 weeks ago

The institution serves to anchor English Supremacy and by extension White Supremacy and social inequality in Britain. Nobody should support such a beast with their tax dollars.

What utter hogwash !  Unless you know what you're talking about,  remain silent !!!!

 
 
 
Gulliver
Freshman Guide
4.3.1  Gulliver  replied to  Waykwabu @4.3    3 weeks ago
What utter hogwash !  Unless you know what you're talking about,  remain silent !!!!

Talk to the hand, gimlet lover.

Basically, the Royal Family and British Royalty are the British version of America's confederate monuments.

Both are long overdue for a trip to the recycling bin a history.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
5  Drinker of the Wry    4 weeks ago

I'm of the G, De Maiynes,  Ancient Law-Merchant, school of thought when it comes to the Royal Family - Live and let Live.  If another countries customs, practices and culture don't violate human rights or my country's key interests, it's their call.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
6  Ender    4 weeks ago

So I see none of Harry's children around. I know they are small yet you would think they would have an appearance.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
7  Kavika     4 weeks ago

Being an original 100% Native American whose ancestors have been here, as my grandma and grandpa would say, forever. 

Boozhoo to all you newbies.

 
 
 
evilgenius
PhD Guide
8  evilgenius    3 weeks ago

We were sitting on the plane at Heathrow on Thursday when the pilot announced they were trying to shut down the airspace for 3 hours during this Jubilee thing (saw the Royal AF do a fly over). We managed to get out of there just before that happened, but still was 90 minutes late leaving London.

 
 

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