Former Republicans and Democrats form new third U.S. political party | Reuters

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  john-russell  •  3 weeks ago  •  31 comments

By:   Tim Reid (Reuters)

Former Republicans and Democrats form new third U.S. political party | Reuters
Dozens of former Republican and Democratic officials announced on Wednesday a new national political third party to appeal to millions of voters they say are dismayed with what they see as America's dysfunctional two-party system.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



By Tim Reid4 minute read

LOS ANGELES, July 27 (Reuters) - Dozens of former Republican and Democratic officials announced on Wednesday a new national political third party to appeal to millions of voters they say are dismayed with what they see as America's dysfunctional two-party system.
The new party, called Forward and whose creation was first reported by Reuters, will initially be co-chaired by former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang and Christine Todd Whitman, the former Republican governor of New Jersey. They hope the party will become a viable alternative to the Republican and Democratic parties that dominate U.S. politics, founding members told Reuters.
Party leaders will hold a series of events in two dozen cities this autumn to roll out its platform and attract support. They will host an official launch in Houston on Sept. 24 and the party's first national convention in a major U.S. city next summer.

The new party is being formed by a merger of three political groups that have emerged in recent years as a reaction to America's increasingly polarized and gridlocked political system. The leaders cited a Gallup poll last year showing a record two-thirds of Americans believe a third party is needed.
The merger involves the Renew America Movement, formed in 2021 by dozens of former officials in the Republican administrations

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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago

It seems like Andrew Yang will do whatever he can to keep himself semi-relevant. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1    3 weeks ago

To be filed under TRIVIA.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2  seeder  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago
The new party is being formed by a merger of three political groups that have emerged in recent years as a reaction to America's increasingly polarized and gridlocked political system. The leaders cited a Gallup poll last year showing a record two-thirds of Americans believe a third party is needed.

The merger involves the Renew America Movement, formed in 2021 by dozens of former officials in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Donald Trump; the Forward Party, founded by Yang, who left the Democratic Party in 2021 and became an independent; and the Serve America Movement, a group of Democrats, Republicans and independents whose executive director is former Republican congressman David Jolly.

Two pillars of the new party's platform are to "reinvigorate a fair, flourishing economy" and to "give Americans more choices in elections, more confidence in a government that works, and more say in our future."

The party, which is centrist, has no specific policies yet. It will say at its Thursday launch: "How will we solve the big issues facing America? Not Left. Not Right. Forward."

Historically, third parties have failed to thrive in America's two-party system. Occasionally they can impact a presidential election. Analysts say the Green Party's Ralph Nader siphoned off enough votes from Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore in 2000 to help Republican George W. Bush win the White House.

It is unclear how the new Forward party might impact either party's electoral prospects in such a deeply polarized country. Political analysts are skeptical it can succeed.

Public reaction on Twitter was swift. Many Democrats on the social media platform expressed fear that the new party will siphon more votes away from Democrats, rather than Republicans, and end up helping Republicans in close races.

Forward aims to gain party registration and ballot access in 30 states by the end of 2023 and in all 50 states by late 2024, in time for the 2024 presidential and congressional elections. It aims to field candidates for local races, such as school boards and city councils, in state houses, the U.S. Congress and all the way up to the presidency.

`THE FUNDAMENTALS HAVE CHANGED`

In an interview, Yang said the party will start with a budget of about $5 million. It has donors lined up and a grassroots membership between the three merged groups numbering in the hundreds of thousands.

"We are starting in a very strong financial position. Financial support will not be a problem," Yang said.

Another person involved in the creation of Forward, Miles Taylor - a former Homeland Security official in the Trump administration - said the idea was to give voters "a viable, credible national third party."

Taylor acknowledged that third parties had failed in the past, but said: "The fundamentals have changed. When other third party movements have emerged in the past it’s largely been inside a system where the American people aren’t asking for an alternative. The difference here is we are seeing an historic number of Americans saying they want one."

Stu Rothenberg, a veteran non-partisan political analyst, said it was easy to talk about establishing a third party but almost impossible to do so.

"The two major political parties start out with huge advantages, including 50 state parties built over decades," he said.

Rothenberg pointed out that third party presidential candidates like John Anderson in 1980 and Ross Perot in 1992 and 1996 flamed out, failing to build a true third party that became a factor in national politics.
 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
2.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  JohnRussell @2    3 weeks ago
It seems like Andrew Yang will do whatever he can to keep himself semi-relevant. 

I'm going to disagree with you. I think we need a viable third party.

 
 
 
Drakkonis
PhD Guide
2.1.1  Drakkonis  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.1    3 weeks ago

Agreed. Here's to hoping they don't become more of the same old same old. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
2.1.2  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Drakkonis @2.1.1    3 weeks ago

They have some really good people already involved. That is different.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1.3  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.1    3 weeks ago

I dont have a problem with a third party, other than we are a two party country where third parties have a bleak record. 

Eventually it could be part of the mainstream but in the beginning it will end up helping one side or the other by being a spoiler. 

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
2.1.4  pat wilson  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1.3    3 weeks ago

If not now, when ? A higher percentage of Americans identify as Independent than Dem or Rep.

The time is ripe.

 
 
 
Drakkonis
PhD Guide
2.1.5  Drakkonis  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.1.2    3 weeks ago
They have some really good people already involved. That is different.

I will keep an eye on them. One thing, though. Not a fan of Yang's universal income. It would be better to take that money and use it to create more jobs, in my opinion. A universal income seems like financial fentanyl to me.  

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
2.1.6  TᵢG  replied to  Drakkonis @2.1.5    3 weeks ago
A universal income seems like financial fentanyl to me.  

Indeed but I think we will be forced into measures similar to this.   Technology (AI) is eliminating higher level jobs.   We keep growing the population while reducing available jobs.   That is a disaster waiting to happen.

 
 
 
Drakkonis
PhD Guide
2.1.7  Drakkonis  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.6    3 weeks ago
That is a disaster waiting to happen.

I generally agree. I'm not against developing a limited AI but I think it should be very narrowly employed. As it is now, the goal isn't for the betterment of mankind but, rather, for increased profit. Humans need purpose and the way AI is being pursued, that purpose is being eliminated.  

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
2.1.8  TᵢG  replied to  Drakkonis @2.1.7    3 weeks ago

But we both know that profit is going to prevail.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.1.9  CB   replied to  TᵢG @2.1.8    3 weeks ago

Yes! Dragged in voluntarily or kicking and screaming.  This mildly reminds me of NETFLIX - forced to keep its spot, deal with its losses, by succeeding price hikes. Some so immediate that patrons are told several increases within month of each other. Competition can be a beast! And if you are not moving, . . . you are demanding some other company out to 'you.'

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.1.10  CB   replied to  TᵢG @2.1.6    3 weeks ago

As there are 1 percenters 'trapped' in generational wealth, there are the 99 percenters 'trapped' in poverty and/or mediocrity. We see that in stark relief in our present world. The 99 percent need all the assists that can be provided them. So what if it is a 'hand-up'?  Keep this in mind, early 1900's gave us the progressive tax. It was only then that the poor could even appear in public to look like 'somebody' of the gentle class. Able to afford some or all of their necessities and have a small disposable income to boot. Elsewise, the rank and file looked  and smelled the part of the wretchedly and desperate underclass.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
2.1.11  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  CB @2.1.10    3 weeks ago
there are the 99 percenters 'trapped' in poverty

If 99% of us were trapped in poverty, the gaming industry, entertainment, and recreation industries, even the hospitality industry wouldn't be coming back strong.  I see delivery service trucks all day long in my neighborhood and no one here takes care of their own lawn.  

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
2.1.12  Trout Giggles  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.1    3 weeks ago

Me, too

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Senior Quiet
2.1.13  Jack_TX  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.1.2    3 weeks ago
They have some really good people already involved. That is different.

The fact we're talking about people (plural) is different already. 

I'm very interested. 

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3  CB     3 weeks ago

Honestly, the two-parties have no one to blame but themselves for all their silly, ridiculous, congressional "cat-fighting." No one ASKED the two-parties to get stuck on each other! No one has the time or inclination to care what started it. In that regard, I commend any group that can get inbetweens these 'fools' in D.C.

And yes, I do understand and accept that there will be adjustments to be had/made. But, again, the two-parties need a big pail of cold water thrown in both their faces! Maybe they can snap out of it, before aiding or being complicit in bring about a SECOND civil war!

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
3.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  CB @3    3 weeks ago

I think that this has been a long time coming. We need a third party. We are the only western nation with only 2 choices, which is really no choice at all.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.1  CB   replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    3 weeks ago

"Open Sesame!" Just like that Senator Joe Manchin and maybe Senator Sinema are interesting again. Just. In. The. Nick. Of. Time??? Is it a time for reflection for these two? The dire outlook for the mid-terms? A realization that blinko-bingo they could not be the main players in the political cesspool? That said, a third political party won't be an easy fit. It will take some serious effort-especially if the two parties relent.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
4  Ronin2    3 weeks ago

This will go the way of every third party. 

If they are lucky they will have as much success as Perot's third party- which vanished from existence as members abided by preset party term limits.

It will take an earth mover to get anyone to stop voting for the "lesser of two evils".

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
4.1  Snuffy  replied to  Ronin2 @4    3 weeks ago

I believe the Reform Party of the United States still exists and has nominated candidates for presidential elections (among others) including the 2020 election.  Of course since Ross Perot, their candidates have not managed to even pull in 1% of the ballots.  While the two parties hold a hard lock on the debate stage by locking out all other parties, this new third party will make noise but not make much difference in the elections.  

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.2  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Ronin2 @4    3 weeks ago
This will go the way of every third party. 

Is that wishful thinking?

It will take an earth mover to get anyone to stop voting for the "lesser of two evils".

Don't you think it's time?

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
4.2.1  CB   replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.2    3 weeks ago

Well now there's a new one: "The lesser of Three evils." jrSmiley_50_smiley_image.gif Oppo research will become wonderfully inflated, expensive and profitable, or drenched in unmanageable deepening confusion!

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
5  Sean Treacy    3 weeks ago

Its a good concept but who's the target audience? There's really no interest group that isn't already within the two parties respective umbrellas right now, and those people who politically active in our system tend to be zealots who view people who disagree with them as domestic terrorists.   I'm curious what platform they can create that will attract the tiny amount of actual independents who exist that won't cause them to desert over some pet issue. 

 
 
 
Drakkonis
PhD Guide
5.1  Drakkonis  replied to  Sean Treacy @5    3 weeks ago
I'm curious what platform they can create that will attract the tiny amount of actual independents who exist that won't cause them to desert over some pet issue.

Well, whatever the platform turns out to be, it will need to appeal to as much of the center as possible in order to have a chance. I really would like to see a third party. I think I'd actually like to see something along the lines of a parliamentary system. Less all or nothing. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
6  Texan1211    3 weeks ago

It would be nice if the new party was fiscally sane and agreed to a balanced budget if ever elected.

Republicans and Democrats have shown repeatedly that the national debt is really no concern to them.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
7  TᵢG    3 weeks ago

In principle I am entirely in favor of a third choice.   In reality, it depends upon the nature of the party.    Regardless, if a third party can gain sufficient traction to be viable, that is good in and of itself because it would logically offer something distinct from the other parties.

How about this, a political party that cares about border security, national debt, climate, environment, economy, defense, education, innovation, universal health care (public standards, private execution), and renewable energy (for starters)?

 
 
 
Drakkonis
PhD Guide
7.1  Drakkonis  replied to  TᵢG @7    3 weeks ago
How about this, a political party that cares about border security, national debt, climate, environment, economy, defense, education, innovation, universal health care (public standards, private execution), and renewable energy (for starters)?

Madman!!!

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
7.1.1  TᵢG  replied to  Drakkonis @7.1    3 weeks ago

I know, crazy shit.   jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
PhD Principal
8  Just Jim NC TttH    3 weeks ago

WTH? We have a plethora of parties now. Everyone has a choice to go the way of those "others". They just have a message problem. And I think this one, although a valiant thought, will try to garner the votes of indies but will be hard pressed to sway any Dem/GOP votes of any consequence.

 
 

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