Californians asked to keep AC at 78 and nix electric vehicle charges to spare grid | Washington Examiner

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  texan1211  •  4 weeks ago  •  47 comments

By:   Washington Examiner

Californians asked to keep AC at 78 and nix electric vehicle charges to spare grid | Washington Examiner
California grid operators warned residents to prepare for voluntary energy cuts and other emergency measures, such as turning down the air conditioning and forgoing electric vehicle charges, as the state braces for a period of excessive heat expected to last through Tuesday.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


California grid operators warned residents to prepare for voluntary energy cuts and other emergency measures, such as turning down the air conditioning and forgoing electric vehicle charges, as the state braces for a period of excessive heat expected to last through Tuesday.

The California Independent System Operator said in a statement it is taking measures to bring "all available resources" online ahead of the heat wave, which is expected to be the longest and most severe high-heat period to hit the state so far this year.

An excessive heat warning is in effect through much of Southern California, with the National Weather Service warning of "dangerously hot" conditions that could climb as high as 115 degrees in some parts of the state.


An impactful, long duration heat wave is expected from the beaches to the desert through Labor Day. High to very high heat risk will impact the coast and valleys by Sun & Mon. Plan ahead now so you can stay cool and hydrated, especially if you have outdoor plans. #CAwxpic.twitter.com/JbQPWueLCw — NWS San Diego (@NWSSanDiego) August 29, 2022

Meanwhile, temperatures in Northern California are expected to be 10-18 degrees warmer than usual.

"If weather or grid conditions worsen, the ISO may issue a series of emergency notifications to access additional resources and prepare market participants and the public for potential energy shortages and the need to conserve," CAISO officials warned Tuesday night. "The power grid operator expects to call on Californians for voluntary energy conservation via Flex Alerts over the long weekend."

This could include asking residents to set thermostats to 78 degrees or higher, avoid large appliance use and EV charging, and turn off unnecessary lights between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m, when the grid is the most stressed.

Lowering power usage during that time will ease the strain on the grid, officials said, and prevent "more drastic measures, including rotating power outages."


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Texan1211
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Texan1211    4 weeks ago

Sheer brilliance from California--again.

SMH

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
2  Nerm_L    4 weeks ago

Does this mean California utilities can draw more heavily from home solar installations?  I don't know and Google hasn't been friendly.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
3  seeder  Texan1211    4 weeks ago

What is California's plan to increase the output of electricity?

In a relative short period of time, gas cars will not be sold there, so many more electric cars will be placing more pressure on the grid.

What are they gonna do? Have even-numbered addresses charge on Mon, Wed, Fri, and odd numbers on Tue, Thurs, Sat?

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
3.1  Nerm_L  replied to  Texan1211 @3    4 weeks ago
What is California's plan to increase the output of electricity?

In a relative short period of time, gas cars will not be sold there, so many more electric cars will be placing more pressure on the grid.

What are they gonna do? Have even-numbered addresses charge on Mon, Wed, Fri, and odd numbers on Tue, Thurs, Sat?

Maybe California is planning for everyone to live in their cars.  With all the weirdness in CA politics it's difficult to discount anything.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
3.1.1  seeder  Texan1211  replied to  Nerm_L @3.1    4 weeks ago
Maybe California is planning for everyone to live in their cars.  With all the weirdness in CA politics it's difficult to discount anything.

A unique solution to their massive housing problems.

Kind of wish you hadn't wrote it out, because some yahoo may try to run with it!

 
 
 
bccrane
Freshman Silent
3.1.2  bccrane  replied to  Nerm_L @3.1    4 weeks ago

Or, how about mandating those that have EV's drive to areas that have the power, charge up the vehicle, then drive back home and power the home with the EV, that should take care of the lack of power problem /s.

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Quiet
4  charger 383    4 weeks ago

Sounds like the governor and legislature is not as smart as they think they are.  

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
4.1  seeder  Texan1211  replied to  charger 383 @4    4 weeks ago
Sounds like the governor and legislature is not as smart as they think they are.  

It is simply impossible for them to be as smart as they think they are.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2  Ender  replied to  charger 383 @4    4 weeks ago

Same as other states, like the Texas power grid and now the MS water works.

Seems none of the states are handling infrastructure very well.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
4.2.1  seeder  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @4.2    4 weeks ago

Texas has had one bad incident. California has had rolling blackouts for over 20 years now.

Slight difference, but I don't expect everyone to see it.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.2  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @4.2.1    4 weeks ago

Unlike some I can see where there are problems country wide. One can call a state worse than others, it does nothing to accomplish anything.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
4.2.3  seeder  Texan1211  replied to  Ender @4.2.2    4 weeks ago

I called their 'plan' brilliant (sarcastically- and never said it was worse.

I guess you see more in my words than others.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.4  Ender  replied to  Texan1211 @4.2.3    4 weeks ago

I can just see where infrastructure all over the country is failing. This shouldn't be some bipartisan shouting match between factions. It seems to be a serious problem that no one has any answers for.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4.2.5  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Ender @4.2.4    4 weeks ago
It seems to be a serious problem that no one has any answers for.

We've got the $1.2 trillion Infrastructure Bill that passed late last year.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
4.2.6  Ender  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.2.5    4 weeks ago

We all know how states are with a whirlwind of cash....

Everyone will get paid up until the actual work needs to be done, then they run out of money.  jrSmiley_100_smiley_image.jpg

Really, I hope it does some good for the cost.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
4.2.7  Snuffy  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.2.5    4 weeks ago
It seems to be a serious problem that no one has any answers for.
We've got the $1.2 trillion Infrastructure Bill that passed late last year.

That bill has $65B earmarked for power but it doesn't break down how that money is to be spent.  ie, how much goes for new lines, how much to repair / harden existing lines, new power plants, etc.  It's estimated that the cost to replace the entire grid would be $5T.  So it's unclear to me how much improvement $65B will bring us.  It's a start but there's a lot more that needs to be done.

.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4.2.8  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Snuffy @4.2.7    4 weeks ago

Perhaps the WH and Congress didn't prioritize the electrical grid high enough.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4.2.9  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Ender @4.2.6    4 weeks ago

Exactly, states with the highest debt issues per capita are:

  • New York has the highest debt of any state, with total debt of over $203.77 billion. New York's total assets are around $106.61 billion, giving the state a debt ratio of 273.8%. The main culprit for New York's towering debt is overspending on Medicaid. New York has attempted to fill budget gaps by cutting school aid and health care costs in recent years.
  • New Jersey has the second-highest amount of debt in the country. The state's total liabilities total $222.27 billion, surpassing its assets by $198.67 billion. New Jersey's debt ratio is 441.7%. The largest source of debt is the state's unfunded pension and benefits system for public employees. New Jersey legislators are looking toward tax increases because of the state's debt and the growing pressure to fund other priorities such as infrastructure and education.
  • Illinois has the third-highest debt in the U.S., with total liabilities equaling $248.67. With total assets of $53.05 billion, Illinois has $187.7 billion in unfunded liability. This creates a debt ratio of 468.7%, the largest in the U.S. To pay that off, every person in Illinois's 12.7 million population would need to pay $14,780. Like New Jersey, the biggest problem in Illinois contributing to the debt is billions of dollars for retired government workers' pensions and health insurance benefits.
  • Massachusetts has the fourth-highest debt in the United States. Massachusetts's total liabilities are $104.53 billion, and its total assets are $34.214 billion, creating a debt of $68.43 billion. Long-term liabilities are at 305.5% of total assets. Massachusetts's largest sources of debt are infrastructure and pensions.
  • California has the fifth-highest debt of any state, with total liabilities coming out to $362.87 billion. Total assets come out to $301.1 billion, creating a $55.96 billion net debt and giving California a debt ratio of 120.5%. California's debt and liabilities can be broken down into three categories: retirement liabilities, budgetary borrowing, and bond debt. However, combining California's federal, state, and local debt brings California's debt total to over $1 trillion. According to this report, the debt would cost each resident of California $33,000 or each taxpayer $74,000.
 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
4.2.10  JBB  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.2.9    4 weeks ago

Not living in Texas or Florida... Priceless!

And, aren't those also the richest states?

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.2.11  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.2.9    4 weeks ago

It rubs both ways. Here are the states that take the most Federal dollars:

1. West Virginia

No state is more dependent on the federal government than West Virginia, which gets 45.16% of its revenue from federal sources (the 10th-most). West Virginia receives 2.36-times more revenue from the federal government than its residents pay in income taxes, the third-highest ratio across our study. Meanwhile, 4.08% of workers in the state are employed by the federal government (the seventh-most), earning nearly double (1.99) what private, for-profit workers earn on average.

2. New Mexico

New Mexico has the fifth-largest percentage of workers employed by the federal government (6.06%). The ratio of federal funding to income taxes paid is 1.87, the fourth-highest for this metric. Meanwhile, the federal government supplies the state with 41.80% of its revenue.

3. Mississippi

For every $1 paid in income tax in Mississippi, the state takes in $2.53 in federal funding. That’s the second-largest ratio of federal funding to income taxes paid in our study. Meanwhile, 47.31% of state revenues come from federal funding, which is the seventh-highest percentage of all 50 states. Additionally, Mississippi has the 11th-largest percentage of workers employed by the federal government (3.23%).

4. Alabama

Federal workers in Alabama earn just over double the median earnings of private, for-profit workers ($67,948 vs. $33,242). Alabama also has the 10th-highest percentage of workers employed by the federal government (3.33%) as well as the 10th-largest ratio between federal funding to income taxes paid (1.25).

5. Alaska

Alaska has the fourth-largest federal share of state government revenue, as more than half of its revenue (50.83%) comes from federal sources. Nearly 7% of the state’s workforce is employed by the federal government, the fourth-most across our study. Meanwhile, the state has the sixth-largest ratio of federal funding to income taxes paid (1.62).

6. Idaho

Federal employees in Idaho earn 1.89-times as much as private, for-profit workers on average ($60,549 vs. $32,109). That’s the sixth-largest difference across our study. Idaho also has the 17th-highest percentage of workers employed by the federal government (2.75%). Additionally, federal dollars account for 41.08% of state revenue, the 18th-most among the 50 states.

7. Louisiana (Tie)

Only one other state - namely, Wyoming - relies on the federal government for more of its revenue than Louisiana, which relies on the federal government for 52.27% of its money. The Pelican State also receives $1.60 in federal funding for every $1 it pays in income taxes, the seventh-most across our study.

7. Maine (Tie)

While only 2.31% of the workforce in Maine works for the federal government, these workers have 1.74-times the median earnings of private, for-profit workers. That’s the 11th-largest earnings gap in our study. Maine also has the 12th-largest federal funding to income taxes paid ratio (1.19). Finally, federal funding makes up 43.27% of the revenue the state government collects (the 14th-most).

9. Wyoming

No state relies more on funding from the federal government than Wyoming, where 56.43% of the state’s revenue comes from Washington D.C. Wyoming also has the ninth-largest difference between federal dollars received and income taxes paid. For every $1 dollar in income tax that’s paid in Wyoming, the state receives $1.36 in federal funding. Federal workers also comprise 3.37% of the workforce in Wyoming, the ninth-highest percentage in our study.

10. Montana

Montana rounds out our list of the 10 states most dependent on the federal government. With the eighth-highest percentage of workers employed by the federal government (3.54%), federal funding also makes up 46.58% of Montana's total revenue. Meanwhile, the state receives $1.04 in federal funding for every $1 paid in income tax (the 17th-most).

And neither Drinkers nor my facts have anything to do with how the infrastructure bill is doled out.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4.2.12  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.2.11    4 weeks ago
It rubs both ways. Here are the states that take the most Federal dollars:

Rubs both ways? These stats are always interesting as it counts pay checks to military service members that are temporarily stationed in a state or federal employees living there.  In the case of New Mexico, federal dollars to Native Americans are counted as well.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4.2.13  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  JBB @4.2.10    4 weeks ago
Not living in Texas or Florida... Priceless!

Huh?  Of course not, the Bronx is in NYC. 

I read that Biden isn't letting NY off the hook for the $7.7 billion federal unemployment insurance loan that's coming due this month.  NY employers will foot that bill since the state’s plea to waive the debt fell on deaf ears.

Businesses there have until the end of the month to reimburse the feds  for interest accrued on the state’s loan.  This will be the the first of many payments that could continue for 10 years or more. That’s in addition to the regular state unemployment insurance tax.  Hope that these payments don't slow growth and future hiring there.

I think that NY is one of a handful of states that hasn’t paid its unemployment insurance debt to the federal government and owes close to $8 billion.  CA owes more than $17.5 billion. 

The feds are holding the line that  they aren't going to forgive New York’s debt when 44 other states have no debt, and more than 30 states used pandemic aid to pay off their debt.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
5  Ender    4 weeks ago
Lowering power usage during that time will ease the strain on the grid, officials said, and prevent "more drastic measures, including rotating power outages."

Somehow I get the feeling it won't impact the celebrities that live with two people in a 20k square foot mansion with the whole place kept at 72°.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
5.1  Snuffy  replied to  Ender @5    4 weeks ago

Considering some celebrities, they have to keep the temp that low if not lower otherwise the plastic starts to melt.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
5.1.1  Ender  replied to  Snuffy @5.1    4 weeks ago

I know I am spoiled. Not sure how long I would last without ac, it would be rough.

Walking out in the 90+ ° heat, with 80% humidity. It like slaps you in the face.

Even when we go camping it is in a camper with an ac unit.  Haha

To be honest, I keep mine at 74.

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Participates
5.1.2  Freefaller  replied to  Ender @5.1.1    4 weeks ago
To be honest, I keep mine at 74.

Lol you're not spoiled anything above 65 and it's too hot for me to sleep (although I prefer sub 60)

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
5.1.3  Ender  replied to  Freefaller @5.1.2    4 weeks ago

Haha    I have snuck it down to 72 at night. Don't tell anyone...

I have a relative that drops it down to 68.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
5.1.4  Snuffy  replied to  Ender @5.1.3    4 weeks ago

Guess it all depends on where you live and what  you are used to.  Here in Phoenix,  as it's warm most of the year I keep mine at 80 degrees and it seems quite comfortable (especially as compared to outside).  If the humidity is up as it is during monsoon season I drop it by a degree.  I can't imagine setting it down to 72 here, I would be freezing.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
5.1.5  Ender  replied to  Snuffy @5.1.4    4 weeks ago

It's a dry heat...Haha

When I was young I lived in Washington state and Maryland. I was use to snow and cold winters.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
5.1.6  Snuffy  replied to  Ender @5.1.5    4 weeks ago

Yeah,  I grew up in Wisconsin and ran away because of the snow and cold winters.  And I had it really really rough in my time in the Air Force, stationed at such hell-holes (LOL) as Beloxi, MS and Myrtle Beach, SC.  Spent a lot of time in Florida as well as it was so close.  All those places confirmed to me that I also don't like humidity.  So Phoenix it was...  I love it when it's the normal 8 percent humidity...   hehe

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
5.1.7  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Snuffy @5.1.6    4 weeks ago
All those places confirmed to me that I also don't like humidity. 

Then you missed the summer sauna at Anderson AB, Guam or Kunsan AB Korea or Kadena Okinawa.  When I arrived in Korea in 83, all the window AC units were already sold out for the summer.  I had to spray all my leather goods with Lysol that summer to keep mold from growing on the until someone moving out sold me their unit.   

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Participates
5.1.8  Freefaller  replied to  Snuffy @5.1.4    4 weeks ago
Guess it all depends on where you live and what  you are used to

Absolutely true, I'm from central AB and am used to very cold

 
 
 
shona1
Junior Participates
5.1.9  shona1  replied to  Freefaller @5.1.8    4 weeks ago

Morning free..central AB, where is that? If you don't mind me asking...

That's the trouble with you mob, to many flipping States... don't know how you remember them all...not like us only 6 over here..less is best...

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
5.1.10  Snuffy  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @5.1.7    4 weeks ago
Then you missed the summer sauna at Anderson AB, Guam or Kunsan AB Korea or Kadena Okinawa.

You can't miss what you don't like.   So I didn't miss that at all.   LOL

No, like I said I had a really really rough time in the Air Force.  Spent the winter down in Beloxi, MS and experienced the spring where the temp got up to 80 and the humidity got up to 98...   Then was reassigned to Denver, CO to spend the summer up there.  Oct 1st and the first snow flurry hit as I was driving out the main gate the last time on my way to Myrtle Beach, SC.   Yeah, it was tough.   And I spent some really really tough TDY's while in Myrtle Beach..   winter trips to Las Vegas, Hawaii, California, Florida and Gitmo, Cuba.  Summer trips included Kentucky, Canada, New York and northern Germany.  

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
5.1.11  Snuffy  replied to  shona1 @5.1.9    4 weeks ago
That's the trouble with you mob, to many flipping States...

Naw, we don't have too many.  Depending on the president, we only have between 50 and 57 states so it's not that hard.  hehe

 
 
 
shona1
Junior Participates
5.1.12  shona1  replied to  Snuffy @5.1.11    4 weeks ago

Arvo Snuffy..well at least it was in the fifties...

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5.1.13  Kavika   replied to  shona1 @5.1.9    4 weeks ago

Central AB is Alberta, Canada shona. He is closer to your mob than our mob. jrSmiley_4_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
shona1
Junior Participates
5.1.14  shona1  replied to  Kavika @5.1.13    4 weeks ago

Thanks Kavika...We are cousin's abit like the Kiwi's...

I was thinking Alabama but didn't think it was cold there...and I knew Alaska was AK.. didn't realise Free was gas bagging about another country...

And as for all the rest of the States I give up..

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Participates
5.1.15  Freefaller  replied to  shona1 @5.1.9    4 weeks ago
That's the trouble with you mob, to many flipping States... don't know how you remember them all...not like us only 6 over here..less is best...

Hi Shona Alberta (AB) is one of 10 provinces in Canada, we also have 3 territories, so lol we're actually much closer to Aussie numbers than the States 

PS where I am is only 1347 kms from the Artic Circle

 
 
 
magicschoolbusdropout
Freshman Principal
6  magicschoolbusdropout    4 weeks ago

This could include asking residents to set thermostats to 78 degrees or higher, avoid large appliance use and EV charging, and turn off unnecessary lights

Soooooo..............Californication folks need to set their thermostats to what most set theirs at already (Privileged folks can pay for 74 and below settings), shutoff their mega fridge and freezer combo's that house all that "Fancy 12 bucks a pint Ice cream, and garage their clean EV's and start using their "Fossil Fuel" Vehicles ?

[jrEmbed module="jrYouTube" youtube_id="7FAI_-woNh4"]

 
 
 
Snuffy
Masters Guide
8  Snuffy    4 weeks ago

There were several states about a month back who were warning residents to limit the usage of A/C due to the concern that the grid could not handle the load.  This has been an issue for quite some time now.  Just seems crazy to me that some politicians would rather focus on their "green energy" credentials instead of the  underlying power grid that has to be able to handle it.  I guess they are so used to just flipping a switch that they ignore any issues around it and assume the power will just always be there when it's needed.  

Why do we keep electing these "Einstein's" into office?

 
 
 
magicschoolbusdropout
Freshman Principal
8.1  magicschoolbusdropout  replied to  Snuffy @8    4 weeks ago
Just seems crazy to me that some politicians would rather focus on their "green energy" credentials instead of the  underlying power grid that has to be able to handle it.

ALL The time ........ "Real Thought" isn't a prerequisite in the so-called "Thoughtful, Caring" Political Realm.

All that matters is ........ The concept of "Perception/Perceiving" that they just Care !

 
 
 
squiggy
Sophomore Quiet
9  squiggy    4 weeks ago

They’re gonna have some damn fine air by 2035.

 
 
 
magicschoolbusdropout
Freshman Principal
9.1  magicschoolbusdropout  replied to  squiggy @9    4 weeks ago
They’re gonna have some damn fine air by 2035.

To bad it flows over from China !

A lot of people like to imagine pollution respects national borders.
The reality is, it couldn’t care less. A new report found that pollution is traveling around the world and, in particular, moving from China to California.

Reality Sucks !

More like .............. Progressive Liberals fanatics think Pollution will respect their newly Locked Borders, just as they feel "Illegals" crossing the U.S. border "Respect" borders.

 
 
 
Jeremy Retired in NC
PhD Guide
10  Jeremy Retired in NC    4 weeks ago

This is hilarious.  California wants to ban gas engines and today their system shuts down without the extra burden they want to put on it.

 
 
 
Sunshine
Professor Guide
11  Sunshine    4 weeks ago

I say those fancy pools and Hollywood homes need to go.  Private Jets and limos too.  

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
12  seeder  Texan1211    4 weeks ago

Had to share this, some folks will get it!

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