How the year of the pandemic has changed our bodies

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  one month ago  •  72 comments

By:   Jacqueline Stenson

How the year of the pandemic has changed our bodies
Dead butt syndrome. Teeth grinding. Broken toes. Weight gain. How our bodies have changed in the wake of the pandemic.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



From dead butt syndrome to grinding teeth, the pandemic is taking a toll

Whether or not you've been lucky enough to dodge the coronavirus for the last year, the global pandemic still could be taking a toll on your body, from your brain to your nails.

Your body may be suffering effects big or small from the many ways the pandemic has changed our lives — whether it's from regular fear of contracting the deadly virus, losing loved ones unexpectedly, social isolation, job losses and financial struggles, endless hours Zooming from home or other challenges faced.

"The pandemic has truly impacted the health of our nation and not just necessarily with the Covid disease itself," said Dr. Ada Stewart, a family doctor in Columbia, South Carolina, and president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. "As a practicing family physician, I see it every day in some form or another."

Read on and see how the year of the pandemic has changed our bodies.

Brain


Coronavirus concerns have kept many worrying through the night. But for some, the pandemic has had a serious effect on their mental health.

Nearly 1 in 4 adults, or 23 percent, reported drinking more alcohol to cope with their stress during the pandemic, according to the American Psychological Association's latest "Stress in America" survey, released on March 11, 2021.

A survey of more than 5,000 adults conducted in September and published in February in the peer-reviewed medical journal JAMA Network Open found that mental health symptoms increased substantially: 33 percent of respondents reported anxiety or depression symptoms, 30 percent reported Covid-19-related trauma and stress symptoms, 15 percent reported increased substance use and 12 percent said they seriously considered suicide in the month before.

Overall, 43 percent of respondents reported at least one of these adverse mental health symptoms, a number that's about double pre-pandemic figures, said Dr. Ken Duckworth, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard University Medical School in Boston and chief medical officer for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI.

"Broadly speaking, American mental health overall is worse," he said. "We are very social creatures. Human connections are antidepressants, they're anti-anxiety interventions."

Until it's safe to be social, Duckworth encourages people to find creative ways to stay connected, such as virtually or by taking walks together outside, maintaining proper distance.

It's been hard to turn our brains off enough to sleep. Sixty-seven percent of American adults said they are sleeping more or less than they wanted to since the pandemic started, according to the APA's "Stress in America" poll.

There's not much relief in sleep, either. People's dreams continue to be infused with anxiety and negative emotions, according to research published by the APA and multiple studies done around the world.

In response to increased demand for mental health help during the pandemic, NAMI has extended its help line service hours. People can call 800-950-6264 Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET for free support and information.

Skin, hair and nails


Effects of the pandemic have led to changes in people's skin, hair and nails. One of the most talked about is "maskne," the term coined for acne and facial irritation stemming from mask-wearing.

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends combating the problem with steps such as using a moisturizer before and after mask-wearing, skipping makeup when wearing a mask or using products that won't clog pores and choosing a mask that fits snugly and comfortably. And if the skin on your hands is suffering from excessive hand washing, moisturize after each cleansing.

Hair loss could stem from stress or possibly a vitamin deficiency from poor pandemic eating habits. Stress and anxiety may even worsen the hair-pulling disorder trichotillomania.

Teeth


An American Dental Association, or ADA, survey conducted in February found that more than 70 percent of almost 2,300 dentists nationwide reported seeing an increase of teeth grinding and clenching, conditions often linked with stress, in their patients during the pandemic. More than 60 percent of dentists also reported an increase in other dental conditions that can result from stress, including chipped or cracked teeth and joint disorder symptoms such as jaw pain and headache.

Missing dental appointments during the pandemic is another factor contributing to tooth problems, said Ruchi Sahota, a dentist in Fremont, California, and a spokesperson for the ADA. Many people dread going to the dentist in normal times, and fear of contracting the coronavirus gave them one more reason to avoid the dental chair.

"That delay can lead to increased periodontal issues and a risk of cavities where something small that we could have fixed with an easy filling can progress to a large chip or fracture, which then requires a patient to get a crown or even a root canal," she said.

Back and neck


When workplaces closed for the pandemic for some, those who were working from home started using their laptops at their kitchen table, couch or bed. Even if they had a desk at home, it may not have been set up properly to prevent back aches, neck strain, wrist injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome and other aches and pains that can result from long hours working on a computer in poor posture.

Experts say full-blown repetitive stress injuries usually develop gradually over time and may not show up for several months or longer.

Heart


Heart patients who have been slacking off on their diet and exercise regimens during the pandemic or skipping routine medical appointments to monitor important issues such as blood pressure and cholesterol could be at extra risk, said Stewart, the family doctor in South Carolina.

"One of the things I see, and I know many of my colleagues are seeing, is a worsening of many chronic diseases," Stewart said. "Folks have delayed their hypertension or diabetes control, for instance, not coming in for fear of getting the virus or just not coming out of the house, not getting their medications from the pharmacies, etc."

Muscles


With gyms and recreational centers closed or open only on a limited basis, it has been challenging for people to find ways to exercise consistently.

Stewart, the family doctor in South Carolina, said she's seeing fitness gains fade in some of her patients who were on the right track before the pandemic. Stewart hasn't used her own gym membership in a year, but she works out with fitness equipment at home.

All that time sitting can actually weaken your backside, a condition that even has a name: "dead butt syndrome."

Weight


Some people sheltering at home may have lost weight because they aren't eating out as much and are finding time to cook healthy meals and find regular exercise indoors. But for the rest of us it's the opposite: The so-called "Covid 15" has had a noticeable effect on waistlines across the country.

More than six in ten Americans say they experienced changes in weight since the beginning of the pandemic, according to the American Psychological Association's March 2021 "Stress in America" survey.

A large international survey of more than 7,700 adults in April found that 27 percent of all respondents reported weight gain around the start of the pandemic, a figure that increased to 33 percent among those already obese. Fewer than 20 percent reported losing weight.

More than half of parents gained as much as 36 pounds, according to the APA survey.

Weight gain isn't surprising given that many people have been spending more time at home working on computers and passing time with activities like watching TV, baking and snacking. Many gyms have been closed and pandemic fatigue has taken hold.

Dr. Jacqueline Fincher, a primary care doctor in Thomson, Georgia, and president of American College of Physicians, said she's seen more weight gain in her patients, particularly since the fall.

"As fall and winter came, they couldn't get out as much, they couldn't be outside and be more active, and the winter doldrums set in," she said.

Feet


Women who've given up their high heels during the pandemic probably have happier feet. But people who constantly walk around the house barefoot or in socks risk developing foot problems like heel pain and tendinitis, said Dr. Jane Andersen, a podiatrist in North Carolina and a spokesperson for the American Podiatric Medical Association.

And unchecked, simple issues such as tendinitis can develop into more-severe conditions like tendinosis, which is more difficult to treat, Andersen said.

Those with diabetes have more to worry about when it comes to foot issues during the pandemic and should be checking their feet every day, Andersen said.

Wearing shoes at home to cushion the feet and provide arch support can help keep your feet healthy. House shoes also protect your feet against injuries like stubbed toes: Broken toes are something that Andersen and her colleagues have started seeing as a result of people being barefoot in their homes.


Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
[]
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1  Kavika     one month ago

I was affected by the ''ahhh fuck'' syndrome. Waking up every day to find out we were still in the middle of a pandemic.

 
 
 
igknorantzrulz
Senior Participates
1.1  igknorantzrulz  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

i have that reaction, pandemic, or no pandemic...

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
1.1.1  devangelical  replied to  igknorantzrulz @1.1    one month ago

I prescribe an earlier weed dosage. wake up, take a hit, find cap'n crunch.

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
1.1.2  Larry Hampton  replied to  devangelical @1.1.1    one month ago

Wake-and-bake with breakfast is more than sensible in these trying times. 

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
1.1.3  devangelical  replied to  Larry Hampton @1.1.2    one month ago

weed, saving conservative lives for 100 years.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1.4  Ender  replied to  Larry Hampton @1.1.2    one month ago

That sounds like it could be a morning show.

Wake and Bake starting around 10:00 Am (or so)

Starring Dev and Larry.

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
1.1.5  Larry Hampton  replied to  Ender @1.1.4    one month ago

Former Evangelicals with a penchant for pot and prose,,,it could work.

*searching online for pop tarts in bulk*

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
1.1.6  devangelical  replied to  Larry Hampton @1.1.5    one month ago
Former Evangelicals

uh, no. I've been making fun of bible thumpers for almost 60 years.

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
1.1.7  Larry Hampton  replied to  devangelical @1.1.6    one month ago

Well then pleasure to meet ya lol!

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.1.8  Tessylo  replied to  devangelical @1.1.1    one month ago

"weed"

That's my cure all.  

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.1.9  Tessylo  replied to  Ender @1.1.4    one month ago
"That sounds like it could be a morning show.

Wake and Bake starting around 10:00 Am (or so)

Starring Dev and Larry."

I'd watch it!

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
1.2  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

I was going to maintain an athletic regimen to improve my health. that lasted a month, so I decided to gain 30 lbs. instead. anybody want to buy a few hundred DVD's?

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.2.1  Ender  replied to  devangelical @1.2    one month ago

I actually lost a few pounds.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
1.2.2  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  devangelical @1.2    one month ago

I gained 22 lbs.  There was, however, an up-side to the subsequent ice storm.  I lost 25 lbs. shiverin' me arse off.

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
1.2.3  devangelical  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @1.2.2    one month ago

that explains my periodic astigmatism and skull tremors.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
Professor Expert
1.3  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

I cut out an entire meal (breakfast) and resorted to not eating or drinking anything except black coffee from 20:00 to 12:00 the next day (16hours) most days just to cut down on calorie intake.  It did help.

Most days I can work out of the home office.  That keeps me in bed longer by 50 minutes a day, and the drop in stress from the 30 minute commute to the office can't be bad either.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Expert
1.4  1stwarrior  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

256

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
2  Kathleen    one month ago

Anxiety is a big problem. Although it might be from listening too much from the news.... 

 
 
 
igknorantzrulz
Senior Participates
2.1  igknorantzrulz  replied to  Kathleen @2    one month ago

i try and listen to the olds...

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
3  Larry Hampton    one month ago

Our eyes have taken a beating in the last year — screen times have went through the roof. The biggest change being our TV viewing. For me personally it’s also been the masks as they tend to creep right into my eyeballs; I wear one at least 8 hours a day. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
3.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Larry Hampton @3    one month ago

I won't be sorry to see masks go. My eyes are tired, but more so from my COVID hobbies of painting and crochet. 

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
3.1.1  Larry Hampton  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    one month ago

Awesome! Those are great constructive hobbies...and yes, a toll on the eyes. YouTube is my biggest culprit the last year. A lot of guitar practice was my intention, but truly ended up watching more concerts and interviews. Hey, better than fretting. 

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
3.1.2  devangelical  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    one month ago

...my eyes are tired from looking down my nose at the willfully ignorant.

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.3  Kathleen  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    one month ago

Crochet is a big hobby of mine. 

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.4  Kathleen  replied to  Larry Hampton @3.1.1    one month ago

Outdoor yard work was something I got into during this pandemic. Painting the inside of the house too.

 
 
 
igknorantzrulz
Senior Participates
3.1.5  igknorantzrulz  replied to  devangelical @3.1.2    one month ago

beats lookin up the the noses, of the willfully ignorant...

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
3.1.6  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Kathleen @3.1.3    one month ago

Have you done anything recently?

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.7  Kathleen  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.6    one month ago

I made this wall covering in a ocean theme. 

512

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.8  Kathleen  replied to  Kathleen @3.1.7    one month ago

This is a close up. Lots of dc and sc.

512

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
3.1.9  Neetu2  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    one month ago

Lol, Perrie, think of the pros of wearing a mask: no need for makeup or sunscreen, you can make all the faces you want if someone pisses you off in public and they won't know. ;)

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.10  Kathleen  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.6    one month ago

Something else I made a couple months ago. A daisy throw with a matching pillow.

512

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1.11  Tessylo  replied to  Kathleen @3.1.10    one month ago

That is absolutely gorgeous!  I always wished I could crochet but never had the knack or the patience I guess.  My sister used to crochet some lovely afghans.  

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1.12  Tessylo  replied to  Neetu2 @3.1.9    one month ago

"Lol, Perrie, think of the pros of wearing a mask: no need for makeup or sunscreen, you can make all the faces you want if someone pisses you off in public and they won't know."

But they can still see you rolling your eyes though!  A problem of mine!

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.13  Kathleen  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.11    one month ago

Thank you Tessylo, I have been doing it ever since I was 9. It can be very relaxing. 

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
Professor Expert
3.1.14  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Kathleen @3.1.10    one month ago

Very nice work Kathleen.....

Me, I've been catching up on some long overdue work on the model of my first ship.... the base model kit had 500 some pieces.  To date I estimate I have over 10,000 pieces with the handmade details I've added at the half way point of the build...

256256

Started wearing contacts about April......

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
3.1.15  Kathleen  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @3.1.14    one month ago

Thank you...That sounds like a lot of detail work, and fun I bet. I would like to see it when it’s completed. 

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
3.1.16  Neetu2  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.12    one month ago

Lol, yes, they can. 

 
 
 
Freewill
Sophomore Participates
3.1.17  Freewill  replied to  devangelical @3.1.2    one month ago
my eyes are tired from looking down my nose at the willfully ignorant.

So is it your belly or your feet that are willfully ignorant?  jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
4  Thomas    one month ago

My hobby has been cooking and eating, and cooking and eating, and cooking and eating...... Ewwwhh boy. Need to move... can't  jrSmiley_101_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
PhD Guide
5  Paula Bartholomew    one month ago

I was pretty much a recluse before the CV so the stay at home mandate was something I was doing already.  The move has pretty much kept me busy so I am not over eating and I carb load once a week.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Sophomore Principal
6  Gsquared    one month ago

I have already been mostly working from home for several years moving towards full retirement, so the stay at home restrictions have not had much effect.  In fact, I'm enjoying it so much I might never go anywhere again.

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
7  Neetu2    one month ago

Sure, a lot of negative effects have led to a host of health problems, Perrie. A couple of positives I noticed, though, and wish people would learn to incorporate those positives into their lives when life does (whenever that be) return to normal, are: people spending more time outdoors, walking, biking, hiking, etc, and cooking more and relying less on restaurant food. Yes, I know that means restaurants have suffered, but on the other hand, I think people have learned to be more resourceful in their kitchens. 

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
7.1  Thomas  replied to  Neetu2 @7    one month ago

It never ceases to amaze me at the level of prepared foodstuffs that people have in their larder. I remember several years ago looking in someone's cupboard for a bag of flour. They didn't have one. I was like, "How do you make biscuits and pancakes and bread?" They just looked at me, "I buy them."  Oh, boy. So, hopefully we have all gotten better at actually preparing our own meals, even those of us who did not go out to eat that often pre-Covid. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
7.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Thomas @7.1    one month ago

We always have a box of Biscuit on hand for biscuits, pancakes, and waffles. And we always have flour on hand for whatever else we might bake.

We keep a good supply of canned foods on hand, too

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Expert
7.1.2  Hallux  replied to  Thomas @7.1    one month ago

I bought a Kitchen-Aid mixer ... makes kneading dough a breeze and the house smell great!

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
7.1.3  Neetu2  replied to  Thomas @7.1    one month ago

Why, hello there, Tom! Hopefully, people have learned a little bit about themselves in this time. Prepared foods are the curse of shortcut living, frankly. Unhealthy and often lacking in flavor, I don't know why people can't make better choices for themselves and our planet!

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
7.1.4  Thomas  replied to  Hallux @7.1.2    one month ago

Both of my grandmas had Kitchen-Aid mixers. My one grandma had a stainless bucket bread mixer that clamped down to a chair with a top and a dough hook. She used to make us kids spin the handle and mix the bread. Good Memories! 

Now, I like kneading my dough by hand because it just feels good. 

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
7.1.5  Neetu2  replied to  Thomas @7.1.4    one month ago

Much more satisfying, isn't it? Good exercise for your hands! 

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
7.1.6  Thomas  replied to  Neetu2 @7.1.3    one month ago

Greetings and Salutations, Neetu2! I have had enough introspection to last for quite some time. And enough food! It seems that whenever I cook, there are more leftovers than one person should eat. But there is no one else to eat them. Oh, my gosh, I cannot throw them out. I cannot freeze them, the freezer is full.... OK, I will eat them.... Portion Control, you're too fat Tom... Portion Control, you're too fat Tom

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
PhD Guide
7.1.7  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Hallux @7.1.2    one month ago

I tried baking bread once.  I used too much yeast.  It came out looking like when Ricky Ricardo and Fred attempted to do it.  It literally pushed open the oven door.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
7.1.8  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Thomas @7.1.6    one month ago

I can send you my teenagers! They'll eat all of your leftovers! jrSmiley_86_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
7.1.9  Thomas  replied to  Neetu2 @7.1.5    one month ago

It does give your arms and shoulders a workout, especially if you are baking a large amount of bread.  I would not have anything for comparison, as I have only kneaded by hand or using my grandma's old hand cranked bread mixer.  

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
7.1.10  cjcold  replied to  Trout Giggles @7.1.1    one month ago

Bisquick is my go to for biscuits, pancakes, waffles and shortcake. 

My bread machine has been getting a workout. 

Haven't been forced to open the cases of MREs yet.

Been shooting, reloading and gunsmithing more than usual.

Broke out the bows and crossbow and have actually improved.

Popped the hood on my old blown-up street racer the other day. It's time.

Started playing the bass again. 

Started writing again.

Started working out again.

Sequestering at home has actually been good for me and my body.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
7.1.11  Trout Giggles  replied to  cjcold @7.1.10    one month ago

I've been going to work every day so I haven't managed to learn any new skills or improve the few I do have.

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
7.1.12  Thomas  replied to  cjcold @7.1.10    one month ago

I am thinking of marketing plain flour as pancake mix: just add eggs, milk and baking powder

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
7.1.13  Neetu2  replied to  Thomas @7.1.6    one month ago

Haha, Tom, I can imagine how fat you've grown. 

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
7.1.14  cjcold  replied to  Thomas @7.1.12    one month ago

Mother's little helper?

 
 
 
Thomas
Freshman Guide
7.1.15  Thomas  replied to  Neetu2 @7.1.13    one month ago

Hey, now. I have not gained that much weight. I can still see my toes.

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
7.1.16  cjcold  replied to  Trout Giggles @7.1.11    one month ago

Thankfully I am no longer a paramedic. 

I like being retired at this point in time.

This pandemic is going to get a whole lot worse before it gets better.

Right wing fools are reopening much faster than they should be. 

Every premature opening brings on a peak of new cases.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
7.1.17  Tessylo  replied to  cjcold @7.1.16    one month ago

A lot of states are easing restrictions, including Maryland, it seems like they're doing too much, too quickly.  

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Expert
9  Hallux    one month ago

The old 'normal' is not coming back ... learn how to lick stamps.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
10  Vic Eldred    one month ago

The pandemic may have changed the bodies of those who could stay home. I'm assuming there was a greater price paid by those who couldn't afford to stay home.

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Expert
10.1  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @10    one month ago

The greatest price will be paid by Covid long haulers.

 
 
 
Larry Hampton
Professor Guide
10.1.1  Larry Hampton  replied to  Hallux @10.1    one month ago

I know nurses who now see some of their dead Coronavirus patients when they sleep. The enormous scale of the pain that nurses have taken on invades their soul.

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
10.1.2  cjcold  replied to  Larry Hampton @10.1.1    one month ago

Retired from being a paramedic many years ago and still have the nightmares.

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
10.1.3  cjcold  replied to  Hallux @10.1    one month ago

Am a long hauler and experience new/old signs and symptoms weekly.

Just had the initial leg rash from a year ago come back yesterday.

Getting tired of this.

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
10.2  Neetu2  replied to  Vic Eldred @10    one month ago

That's the sad part. There are many who had to line up for donated food, as we saw. The whole thing was a disaster, no doubt, but much could have been better managed. However, I refuse to go into politics so I'll leave it there. 

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
10.2.1  expatingb  replied to  Neetu2 @10.2    one month ago
There are many who had to line up for donated food, as we saw.

Unfortunately so.  Had people simply gone about their business, using appropriate precautions and not going into panic mode, many of those initial problems would have been avoided.  Better yet, had people actually been prepared for possible disruptions in their lives and normal routines they would have been in even better shape.

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
10.2.2  Neetu2  replied to  expatingb @10.2.1    one month ago

Agreed. Very unfortunate. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
11  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)    one month ago

The biggest change in my life is not having to get up at 4:30 am to commute 30 miles one way through Detroit to get to work and then fight traffic at 3:30 / 4pm for 30 miles on the return home. I hardly ever made home-cooked meals when I was commuting to and from work... Now that I get two hours of my day back, I make dinner most nights. The nights that I don't, there's usually leftovers people can eat.

We're all pretty much home-bodies. The only thing I feel bad about is my son... he's had no interaction with kids his own age for a year now. Quite frankly, otherwise, my life has been easier. No weight gain, but no loss either. My teeth are fine, my hair and nails look nice. I get occasional headaches, but that's not really anything new; I probably get them less now that I don't have the stressful commute.

 
 
 
Neetu2
Freshman Silent
11.1  Neetu2  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @11    one month ago

Where I live, many school districts are returning to full-time school for kids because teachers have been vaccinated as a priority. I hope that happens in Michigan, too. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
11.1.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Neetu2 @11.1    one month ago

My daughter is back full time [senior in HS], but we set online up for my son [7th grade] for the entire year, because he loves visiting his grandparents [his grandma is 78 w/health issues and his grandpa is 81].

 
 
Loading...
Loading...

Who is online







48 visitors