Hundreds of dogs rescued from USDA-licensed breeder in Iowa

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  4 weeks ago  •  23 comments

By:   Tim Fitzsimons

Hundreds of dogs rescued from USDA-licensed breeder in Iowa
Hundreds of sick and malnourished dogs have been removed from the Iowa property of dog breeder Daniel Gingerich, who was accused of Animal Welfare Act violations.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Hundreds of sick and mistreated dogs have been rescued from the properties of an Iowa dog breeder, whom the U.S. Department of Justice accused in September of multiple violations of the Animal Welfare Act.

Daniel Gingerich agreed to forfeit all of the dogs he was keeping at multiple properties and "permanently refrain" from activities that would require an Animal Welfare Act license, including dog breeding, according to a consent degree entered Tuesday.

Michael G. Byrne, Gingerich's attorney, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The DOJ alleged in a Sept. 28 motion for a temporary restraining order that Gingerich "repeatedly evaded, or attempted to evade," inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, or APHIS, until March 2021, when inspectors first gained access to some of Gingerich's properties.

Gingerich, who was licensed in October 2019 by the USDA to breed dogs, received over 100 violations of the AWA after inspectors first gained access to his properties six months ago.

"During one recent inspection, APHIS inspectors observed a severely emaciated golden retriever, several dogs with untreated and painful eye conditions, and a non-responsive puppy that died moments later," the DOJ said in a statement.

One of more than 500 dogs and puppies rescued from a licensed breeder in Seymour, Iowa.Animal Rescue League of Iowa

The DOJ further accused Gingerich of failing to provide vet care and access to potable water; of failing to identify his animals and maintain their records; and of failing to maintain a livable climate, appropriate enclosures and clean, structurally sound housing.

"The Court will not belabor the revolting quality of the food inspectors described in their citations but among some of the violations are food that is 'moldy,' 'deteriorating,' or 'excessive amount of wood shavings,'" the DOJ wrote in the restraining order document.

Puppies were also unvaccinated for parvovirus and distemper, "resulting in multiple disease outbreaks," the DOJ said.

A veterinarian with the APHIS said that she had "never encountered a licensee who has this high of a level of chronic and repeat noncompliance across every category of Animal Welfare Act requirements" and that of all the facilities she has toured, Gingerich's "are the all-around least compliant facilities," according to the court document.

One of more than 500 dogs and puppies rescued from a licensed breeder in Seymour, Iowa.Animal Rescue League of Iowa

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Animal Rescue League of Iowa have been working with partners to remove the canines from Gingerich's properties since Oct. 14, the groups said in a statement.

Thirty of the dogs that were in acute medical distress were taken first, and in the subsequent two weeks over 200 additional dogs and puppies have been removed, the ASPCA said.

Some dogs have remained on the properties and are being cared for daily, the ASPCA said.

"The light is shining on bad actors in the dog breeding industry as a result of this action by the Department of Justice," Tom Colvin, CEO of the Animal Rescue League of Iowa, said in the statement. "A new approach of stopping them before animals suffer is long overdue."


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Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1  Buzz of the Orient    4 weeks ago

What would be a suitable punishment for that guy?  It's too bad his victims can't suggest something appropriate.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    4 weeks ago
What would be a suitable punishment for that guy? 

How about a cold, wet cage with moldy food and no water?

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
1.2  Veronica  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    4 weeks ago

A one foot chain on a pole with no shelter & food & water dishes three feet away.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     4 weeks ago

Sadly the punishment for scum like this isn't nearly severe enough.

Iowa law prohibits agricultural inspectors from routine inspections of breeders facilities, maybe now they will get their heads out of their asses and allow them. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
2.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Kavika @2    4 weeks ago

That sounds regressive to me.  But maybe that's why I saw a joke sign that said "Welcome to Iowa. Bring something to do."

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3  Trout Giggles    4 weeks ago

This guy will make reputable breeders look bad.

I personally don't want a pure bred unless it's a minature beagle, and even those are crossed with either weiner dogs or bassett hounds (not sure which). I prefer pound puppies that don't know their mama or their daddy and are fuzzy, small, and happy

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Guide
3.1  evilgenius  replied to  Trout Giggles @3    4 weeks ago
I prefer pound puppies

There will be 500 new pound puppies spread out across the country from this guy's neglect.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
3.2  Ozzwald  replied to  Trout Giggles @3    4 weeks ago
This guy will make reputable breeders look bad.

This guy makes human beings look bad.

 
 
 
Hallux
Sophomore Principal
4  Hallux    4 weeks ago

From the Des Moines Register: Oct. 18, 2021

A federal judge has denied, for now, a request by Wayne County dog breeder Daniel Gingerich to transfer all of his dogs to an Indiana organization, and warned him he appears to be in contempt of court.

The warning from U.S. District Court Judge Stephanie Rose came during a hearing Monday morning on Gingerich’s request to transfer all of his dogs to the Love Pet Project, a self-described “rescue” organization based in Zionsville, Indiana.

During the hearing, it was revealed that Gingerich still has 453 dogs in his possession, not the 189 that was specified in a court papers filed last week by his attorney, Michael Byrne of Mason City.

Byrne explained to the court that the confusion stemmed from “poor wording” on his part, noting that the lower count included only adult dogs and excluded all of the puppies.

The judge also stated that when Gingerich arrived at the federal courthouse for an Oct. 8 hearing, his driver appeared to be drunk  and urinated on the street in front of the courthouse. Gingerich was an hour late for that hearing, having traveled to Des Moines that day from his sister’s home in Ohio.

Gingerich is currently facing sanctions from both the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship for more than 100 violations of Animal Welfare Act. On Oct. 8, he was ordered to   surrender all dogs in his possession that were in acute distress and in need of medical care.

More at site:

The lawyer needs to be sanctioned!

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
4.1  Ozzwald  replied to  Hallux @4    4 weeks ago
On Oct. 8, he was ordered to   surrender all dogs in his possession that were in acute distress and in need of medical care.

Surrender the dogs?  Bullshit!!!!  Someone needs to go in and forcibly take possession of all the dogs by court order.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
4.2  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @4    4 weeks ago

Maybe that's why the word "lawyer" sounds so much like the word "liar".  In fact, maybe Shakespeare was right when he wrote "The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." (Henry VI, Part 2)

 
 
 
Dragon
Freshman Silent
5  Dragon    4 weeks ago

I volunteer at an animal shelter, taking care of large dogs. Anybody who purchases a dog or cat from a breeder, shame on them! There are thousands of dogs, cats and other animals at shelters who are desperate for a forever family. Why would anyone need a pure bred animal unless they are going to show them, and I am not totally on board with that either.  Please, don't buy, adopt. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5.1  Kavika   replied to  Dragon @5    4 weeks ago

I volunteer as well and work with bully breeds getting them ready for adoption. 

DON'T BUY, ADOPT.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
5.2  Ozzwald  replied to  Dragon @5    4 weeks ago
Anybody who purchases a dog or cat from a breeder, shame on them!

I disagree with this.  Some people prefer certain breeds and should have the right to have the breed of their choice.

At my home we have 3 dogs.  My preference is Rottweilers, and we get them at a "reputable" breeder.  Our other 2 dogs are all rescues, "super mutts" according to the DNA.

When we purchased my Rottie, we made sure to research all the breeders and only purchased one that allowed us to inspect their property and meet both parents (or at least one) if both are on-site.  We did not go to a pet store, we did not purchase online, and actually turned down a couple offers because they would not allow us to meet the puppy at their facility.

I have nothing against adopting, but sometimes you want a particular breed of dog, and you (for the most part) cannot get that through adoptions.

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Quiet
5.2.1  charger 383  replied to  Ozzwald @5.2    4 weeks ago

We agree here!  I have had Dobermans for 30+ years,  Last 2 I got through a Doberman group, that checks both you and the dog.  Now I have an older Doberman and a young black Lab.     

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
5.2.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ozzwald @5.2    4 weeks ago

I've known 2 Rotties in my life and I don't know how they got their reputation as a "bully dog". Both that I knew were the gentlest giants. One thought he was a lap dog and the other one played with my minnie beagle so gently...until he got tired of Buster bugging him so he would pin Buster to the floor with one of his long legs. It was hilarious because Buster squirmed and squirmed until Dax let him up

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
5.2.3  Veronica  replied to  Trout Giggles @5.2.2    4 weeks ago

My father-in-law had a rottie... her name was Baby and she was one BIG baby.  She was a sweetheart.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
5.2.4  Ozzwald  replied to  Trout Giggles @5.2.2    4 weeks ago
I've known 2 Rotties in my life and I don't know how they got their reputation as a "bully dog".

My 1st rottie, at 135 lbs, used to have children run up and try to climb on him like a horse.  You could tell he didn't like it, but no growl or anything, and he would lick the children to death once they stopped trying to climb on him.

When my girls were young, we had a 150 lbs rottie.  Actually had someone ask if we were afraid to let them play with him.  Rotties are some of the gentlest dogs there are, and smart.  My last one (passed 3 months ago) learned how to turn a knob and push, or pull, a door open.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
5.2.5  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  Trout Giggles @5.2.2    4 weeks ago

Then there was Xena, the sweetest Rottie ever...  When my best friend brought her infant son home from the hospital, her dog Xena became this huge mass of growling, shaking muscle every time someone stepped within 6ft of J. and the baby.  The only people that Xena allowed to get close were J's husband, and me (thank goodness).  There was a time that I thought J's mother-in-law would have been attacked had I not stepped in between Xena and the MIL.  Can you imagine how many Thanksgivings that would have screwed up?  The good news is that Xena never did actually attack anyone.  But there were some scary moments for a few folks who simply wanted to see the new baby.  Who is now in college.  Oy.

And, story #2...

About 10 days before their wedding, 2 clients of mine were putting the finishing touches on their new house, when all of the sudden, their Rottie, which the bride had given to the groom as a puppy a few years before, unexpectedly attacked her as she was about to sit down next to the groom.  The dog ripped a hole in the bride's stomach big enough for her intestines to come spilling out onto the living room carpet.  I can't remember how the groom was able to get the dog off of the bride, but he did, and then rushed her to the nearest emergency room which was close by.  Thankfully, the bride's condition improved enough for them to keep their wedding date, but it was touch and go for a minute.  On wedding day, part of the still-healing injury was visible due to the draped low-cut nature of the front of the wedding dress, and the outline of the remaining drains could be seen through the dress.  The bride did a wonderful job of trying to hide how much pain she was in, but if I remember correctly, the reception was cut short by 2 1/2 hours.

I found out later that the bride and groom were told that their dog was taken out to the country to live with some distant cousins who owned a farm.  They would miss her, but understood that distance was probably best.  What they were never told was that a judge ordered the dog to be put down 3 days before the wedding.  I'm guessing that if they are still married, they still don't know their Rottie's ultimate fate.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
5.2.6  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Ozzwald @5.2    4 weeks ago

We had to be sure we brought home a dog that would not cause an allergic reaction, so it was necessary to be sure we were getting a pure-bred Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier - hair, not fur.  But my daughter now has a shelter dog. 

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
5.2.7  Ozzwald  replied to  charger 383 @5.2.1    4 weeks ago
We agree here!  I have had Dobermans for 30+ years

I was into rotties, my sister was into Dobermans.  She loved them and has been upset because for the last 10 years (about), she has not lived anywhere that would allow a large dog like that.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
5.2.8  Ozzwald  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @5.2.5    4 weeks ago
And, story #2...

You understand that the fault does not lie with the rottie.  Right?  Rotties are one of the most protective dogs out there in regards to family.  When being raised you simply have to take that into account.  Rotties, because of their size, must be trained.  If not, you can see incidents like you describe, or even just accidents because they do not understand their own size.

 
 
 
Kathleen
Professor Principal
6  Kathleen    4 weeks ago

Oh wow... this kind of stuff upsets me so much.

I am glad they rescued them and this guy should be thrown in jail. 

 
 
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