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Get A Load Of These Insane Christian Nationalists Who Believed Rights Come From God And Not The Government

  

Category:  The Zoo

Via:  gregtx  •  2 months ago  •  26 comments

Get A Load Of These Insane Christian Nationalists Who Believed Rights Come From God And Not The Government
You're not gonna believe this. Check out this list of radical Christian nationalists who believe inalienable human rights are endowed on them by some sort of higher power, a Creator, or something like that, and not by the federal government.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


You're not gonna believe this. Check out this list of radical Christian nationalists who believe inalienable human rights are endowed on them by some sort of higher power, a Creator, or something like that, and not by the federal government.

1. This idiot named John Locke

This loser thought liberty came from the Law of Nature and wasn't subject to the "legislative authority of man." Whatever that means. Rights come from the government. Everyone knows that.

2. Total loser Thomas Jefferson

Just look at the unhinged insanity in the eyes of this deranged radical.

3. This stupid thing called The Declaration of Independence.

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights..." UHG. Who wrote this crap?

4. Some dummy named Thomas Paine

Paine claimed that every child born into the world must be considered as deriving its existence from God. Uh, yeah. Ok, weirdo.

5. Moron and inventor of lightning Benjamin Franklin

This creep said that liberty is derived from the laws of God. Put this one on an FBI Watchlist…he's about to storm the Capitol.

These guys are all dummies. Do human rights come from God? Never. Rights come from the government and are disseminated to the population through the mainstream media. We need to stamp out this ridiculous scourge of Christian nationalism wherever we see it... before we lose our democracy.


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GregTx
PhD Guide
1  seeder  GregTx    2 months ago

256

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Principal
2  Sean Treacy    2 months ago

They turned our country's literal founding document into evidence of "extremism."  

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
3  charger 383    2 months ago

Americans have rights because our ancestors took rights for themselves with guns and gave their descendants the Second Amendment so they could keep their rights.   

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.1  JohnRussell  replied to  charger 383 @3    2 months ago

yikes

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
4  JohnRussell    2 months ago

God may give us our rights but without some form of government to enforce them they don't mean much.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  JohnRussell @4    2 months ago

So you buy in to the preamble of our Declaration of Rights, regardless of the racists that helped draft it.

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
4.2  seeder  GregTx  replied to  JohnRussell @4    2 months ago

See? You do get satire...

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
4.2.1  Texan1211  replied to  GregTx @4.2    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
4.3  seeder  GregTx  replied to  JohnRussell @4    2 months ago
without some form of government to enforce them

I see  So, much like laws, unless government enforces them, they don't exist?

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
4.3.1  TᵢG  replied to  GregTx @4.3    2 months ago

I think it is more that the actual rights we experience are all traced back to human sources.   It is fine to talk about God-given rights but rights are not reified by a known creator — they are reified by human beings.   And, as such, they vary per society / culture.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
4.3.2  Ronin2  replied to  GregTx @4.3    2 months ago

Until the government abuses those laws against a certain segment of the population. 

The founders would be sickened if they were alive today.

And not just because they were racist Christian nationals.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
5  Gsquared    2 months ago
Check out this list of radical Christian nationalists who believe inalienable human rights are endowed on them by some sort of higher power, a Creator, or something like that, and not by the federal government.

That's why when they wrote the founding document of the United States, the Constitution, they began with the words "We the People", because the consent and agreement of the People is the source of our rights as citizens.

Since some apparently forgot or just don't know, this is the Preamble to the Constitution:

"We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
5.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Gsquared @5    2 months ago

I understand why people want to say that all rights come from God. I think it's fairly harmless to say our rights come from God, but as a practical matter rights come from a government formed by the consent of the people, as you said.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
5.1.1  Ronin2  replied to  JohnRussell @5.1    2 months ago

And what happens when that government no longer represents a very large segment of the people and abuses their entrusted power to act against them?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6  JohnRussell    2 months ago
  1. Not a Christian Nationalist:

    • Unlike Christian nationalists who prioritize the idea of the United States as a specifically Christian nation, Locke’s focus was on individual rights, reason, and tolerance.
    • His contributions to political philosophy emphasized the separation of church and state, promoting a secular framework for governance.

In summary, while John Locke was a Christian philosopher, he did not align with the Christian nationalist movement. His emphasis on reason, tolerance, and individual rights set him apart from those who advocate for a Christian-centric government.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1  JohnRussell  replied to  JohnRussell @6    2 months ago
  1. Not a Christian Nationalist :

In summary, Thomas Jefferson’s religious beliefs were multifaceted, emphasizing reason, morality, and a personal connection to Jesus’s teachings. However, he did not advocate for the idea of America as a Christian nation.
 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.1  JohnRussell  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    2 months ago

Thomas Paine , a prominent figure in American history, held views that diverged significantly from Christian nationalism. Let’s delve into his beliefs:

  1. Religious Criticisms :

  2. Paine’s Views on Religion :

  3. Champion of Reason :

In summary, Thomas Paine’s views on religion were revolutionary, emphasizing individual thought, reason, and freedom.   While he believed in a higher power, he did not align with Christian nationalism or traditional Christian doctrine 3 .

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.2  JohnRussell  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.1    2 months ago

Benjamin Franklin , a multifaceted figure in American history, held a complex blend of religious beliefs. Let’s explore his views:

  1. Early Background :

  2. Deism and Providence :

  3. Views on Jesus Christ :

  4. Christian Influence and Tolerance :

  5. Conclusion :

In summary, Benjamin Franklin was not a Christian nationalist. His religious outlook was nuanced, emphasizing practical ethics and the pursuit of knowledge.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.3  JohnRussell  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.2    2 months ago

NONE of the people the article describes as Christian nationalists were Christian nationalists.

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
6.1.4  seeder  GregTx  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.3    2 months ago

I would think that people that identified as Christian and helped establish a nation would be the definition of Christian Nationalist.....

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.5  JohnRussell  replied to  GregTx @6.1.4    2 months ago

Christian nationalism in modern terminology refers to people who want the government to conform with specific Christian beliefs and attitudes As for example the government must be run according to biblical principles

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
6.1.6  seeder  GregTx  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.5    2 months ago

Mmmm, seems like all grew up with Christian mores. ...

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Principal
6.2  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @6    2 months ago
In summary, while John Locke was a Christian philosopher, he did not align with the Christian nationalist movement. His emphasis on reason, tolerance, and individual rights set him apart from those who advocate for a Christian-centric governmen

That’s the point John. Progressives are now claiming  Locke, Jefferson, and anyone who doesn’t disavow the Declaration of Independence is an extreme “Christian nationalist”.   The Biden doj will probably sick the fbi on “extremist” Christian nationalists who believe humans have inalienable natural rights.

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
6.2.1  seeder  GregTx  replied to  Sean Treacy @6.2    2 months ago

Haven't they already?

FBI Targeting Of Catholics Runs Deeper Than Initially Thought

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Guide
7  Hal A. Lujah    2 months ago

We humans have come a long way in understanding how weather works, where babies come from, what causes disease, how to harness energy to do work instead of using slaves, and a multitude of other former mysteries.  Too bad so many of us have such a long way to go in understanding that god is a farce still being used to enforce caveman level thinking.

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
8  Tacos!    2 months ago

The philosophy of natural rights really doesn’t have anything to do with Christian nationalism.

 
 

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