Dream cars or other wish list toys.

Dream cars or other wish list toys.
By:   epistte
Created:   4 months ago
Comments:   127

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This topic was mentioned sarcastically in another thread and I thought that I might follow it up with an actual discussion. What are your dream cars or other wish list toys that you might purchase if your stock hit it big, you inherited a million from a long-lost aunt or you happened to win the lottery? 

Cars, planes, boats, tech' toys, kitchen stuff, homes, artwork and even antiques are welcome.

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epistte
1  epistte    4 months ago

I'm sure there are people who dream of sailboats, power boats, yachts, sporting equipment or various high-end tech toys.

All that I ask is to please keep the conversation both civil and apolitical.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2  Buzz of the Orient    4 months ago

Persons who might be interested in "dream cars" should join and contribute some of their knowledge to the Antique and Classic Car group:

https://thenewstalkers.com/buzz-of-the-orient/group/173/antique-and-classic-cars

This is MY dream car. It's not a Rolls Royce. It's not a Bugatti Veyron. It has been my dream car since my father had the Jaguar dealer bring it around to his factory for us to see. I got into the back seat, sunk into the sweet-smelling glove leather and gazed at the solid burled walnut trays and thought that this wasn't a car for the nouveau riche, not even for the OLD rich, this was a car for royalty.  My father didn't like it and bought a Cadillac instead.

My dream car, for almost 60 years. A 1959 Jaguar Mark IX.

Jag 1.jpg

However, that's just a car. What I NEED is a home, and the home I want is the one in which the grandmother of Nikki Ferrante (played by Cary Grant) resided in 'An Affair to Remember'. No, I don't want a castle in Spain or a Penthouse in New York City or a beach house in Malibu. I want to sit out on that terrace overlooking the Mediterranean sipping an ice cold Sangria.

affair 2.png

Affair 3.jpg

But first, if I were to win a BIG lottery that would enable me to afford anything I wanted, the first thing I would do is reserve enough rooms in a resort somewhere central in the USA and invite as my guests, who would only need to pay their own travel expenses (I would cover the room and meal costs) for a weekend get-together, all the members of thenewstalkers.  Do you think The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs would do?

I might need a little more than a million. LOL 

 
 
epistte
2.1  epistte  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2    4 months ago
I might need a little more than a million. LOL

The Powerball is pushing 320+ million tonight, but you are in Canada, IIRC.

 I would not have recognized that car as a Jaguar. I do see some classic Jaguar XJ lines in the rear greenhouse and the rear fenders now that I take another look at it. 

I love old European wrecks that most Americans wouldn't glance at. Citreon DS and XMs, Peugeot 205 GTi, Maserati Bora and Biturbos, Lancia Betas/Scorpions and the Alfa GTV6.   I love the new Alfa Guila, but the fact that its still an Alfa would scare me from buying it. I might lease it if I had money to burn and a very reliable alternative to drive when it's in the garage.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  epistte @2.1    4 months ago

The 1959 Jaguar Mark IX is much older than the Jag XJ models.  One of my good friends in Toronto drove an XJ6 and I was in that car a lot.

I once posted an article about what I considered the most beautiful cars, and I included the Citroen SM as one of them. I had a Peugeot 604 for 4 years, among the many cars I owned since 1953 (It was boxy and not particularly attractive, but it was a dream to drive - it was called the Cadillac of France).

From what you said in your comment, I can't understand why you're not a member of the Antique and Classic Car group.

By the way, I haven't been in Canada for more than a decade.

 
 
epistte
2.1.2  epistte  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1.1    4 months ago
I once posted an article about what I considered the most beautiful cars, and I included the Citroen SM as one of them. I had a Peugeot 604 for 4 years, among the many cars I owned since 1953 (It was boxy and not particularly attractive, but it was a dream to drive - it was called the Cadillac of France).

There was a professor at college that had a 1980s Peugeot 405. I never had his classes but I would see it parked on the street as a walked from my apartment to class. I occasionally see a 2CV Charleston around town in the summer. I didn't know who owns it but it's amusing to see this old car that always turns heads on the warm summer evenings. 

I didn't know what it is about Citreons that makes them attractive to me, but Citroen isn't afraid to try something new and they always look different from anything else. Renaults seemed to be bland and boring for the most part.

 I know that everyone hated the unusual styling of the Alfa 75(Milano) v6 but I loved that funky car. Id love to find one that could be kept running at a reasonable cost.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  epistte @2.1.2    4 months ago

Yeah, the 2CV is like a cartoon. Most Citroens do have unusual styling, but the SM is beautiful.

See the source image

 
 
epistte
2.1.4  epistte  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1.3    4 months ago

The SM is very sleek and modern even now.

The first time I saw a Citroen DS 21 was at Mid-Ohio race course. It was parked beside of a Lamborghini. I was more taken by the Citreon because it was so original compared to the almost cartoonish Countach. 

 I still love the Merkur(Ford) XR4 and the Porsche 928. Both were ahead of their time.  Even the 2nd generation Mazda MX6 still looks modern 20+ years later.

 
 
sandy-2021492
2.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2    4 months ago
I want to sit out on that terrace overlooking the Mediterranean sipping an ice cold Sangria.

Me, too.  Coffee in the morning, Sangria in the evening.  I'd probably take a blanket and lounge chair and sleep out there now and then, too.

 
 
nightwalker
3  nightwalker    4 months ago

I always had a yearn that if I ever had a big wad of very disposable cash I'd like to be a high-roller at Vegas. It'd take a couple of visits but when you make the (rich suckers) high rollers list, the Casinos will offer you great rooms for free, free chips, and will wine you and dine you and give you free tickets for the shows, provided you lose big and often at your chosen game.

Now here's the deal, sorta with buzz's idea we'd invite everybody on NT, arrange and pay their transport, and tell the Casinos that I'm hosting a convention of newly rich high rollers, (a blatant lie, but in this world you gotta be devious to score the goodies) and see how many rooms, meals and tickets the Casinos will trip over themselves offering all them brand new innocent rich people who want to see if they like gambling or want to spend their pile somewhere else.

I'd have to win just 5-6 billion. No, I wouldn't need to blow more than $1Billion on the "Convention" (Hey, I just remembered. TAX DEDUCTIONS for the convention!) the rest would be for my retirement, I have to take care of me and my life beyond the party. I'd have to look around for a nice place to settle, like France, England, Holland, etc. you know, someplace small and cozy and sane. Hmmm maybe not England.

I wonder if Publisher's Clearing House $5000 a week for life would do it? My hororscope said I was due for a major win.

What say, Buzz? Vegas?

 
 
igknorantzrulz
3.1  igknorantzrulz  replied to  nightwalker @3    4 months ago
$1Billion on the "Convention" (Hey, I just remembered. TAX DEDUCTIONS for the convention!)

all you need do is enter politics, and you can live lavishly selling ones soul for monies used to purchase power and influence, and then live of the sucker taxpayers for your retirement.

Speaking of retirement...

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
3.2  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  nightwalker @3    4 months ago

Nah. I've been to Vegas a few times.  You should google the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs to see why I chose it.

 
 
zuksam
3.2.1  zuksam  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.2    4 months ago
Broadmoor in Colorado Springs

That place looks great but if we're going to Colorado we should stay at The Stanley Hotel.

 
 
sandy-2021492
3.2.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  zuksam @3.2.1    4 months ago

Room 217?

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
3.2.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.2.2    4 months ago

Only if it allows us to meet with our departed members of NT.

 
 
igknorantzrulz
3.2.4  igknorantzrulz  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.2.3    4 months ago

Redrum...

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
3.2.5  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  igknorantzrulz @3.2.4    4 months ago

?

 
 
igknorantzrulz
3.2.6  igknorantzrulz  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.2.5    4 months ago

hold it up to the mirror,

Danny...

 
 
sandy-2021492
3.2.7  sandy-2021492  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.2.5    4 months ago

That's the word the clairvoyant little boy says over and over in "The Shining".  It's "murder" spelled backwards.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
3.2.8  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.2.7    4 months ago

Oh. The only thing I remember from that movie was Jack breaking a hole in the door and saying: "Here's Johnny". LOL

 
 
igknorantzrulz
3.2.9  igknorantzrulz  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.2.8    4 months ago
"Here's Johnny".

"Johnny" was attempting to commit dyslexic sidehom

as he was a homoh side all maniac,

who reached the bottom

when he was at the top of his game

.

redruM rolled out the elevated doors based and meant, to hold back the H2Oh so non ferrous wheels of confusion, that struck a vein vane, whether 

ore knot be leaved a loan

a broken mind could not repay  to the a maze  meant for the ratz binded by the cheese

that causes tight

infirm smiles

 
 
Dean Moriarty
4  Dean Moriarty    4 months ago

https://www.thisiswhyimbroke.com/fully-operational-battle-tank/

With features like a fully functioning 120mm main gun and infrared spotlight.

9FE847B53EEE4357BE264B24979B31DF.jpeg

 
 
Krishna
4.1  Krishna  replied to  Dean Moriarty @4    4 months ago
With features like a fully functioning 120mm main gun and infrared spotlight.

Actually it might not be a bad idea to supply "fully operational battle tanks" such as these to public schools, so that teachers would finally be able to protect themselves and their students against potential shooters armed with AR-15s!

(Let's face it-- AR-15s are powerful weapons. Trump has suggested merely arming teachers with "concealed carry" handguns-- but what teacher in their right mind would go up against a virtual machine gun with a mere pistol?

We should all petition Trump to do this! (And he'd probably agree-- after he, he's a willing pawn of thebNRA and I'm suire they'd love the idea).

 
 
Hal A. Lujah
5  Hal A. Lujah    4 months ago

I was driving in my neighborhood yesterday and stopped at a red light next to a Tesla Model S.  When the light turned green that thing took off like a silent bullet.  Faster than I have ever witnessed any car move, and without a sound.  I so want one.

 
 
Bob Nelson
5.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @5    4 months ago

Electric motors generate maximum power a zero RPM... so they're perfect for acceleration.

 
 
Bob Nelson
6  Bob Nelson    4 months ago

Bently Coupe

2004_bentley_continental-gt_coupe_base_f

 
 
charger 383
7  charger 383    4 months ago

I would restore a steam locomotive and buy lots of model trains.

Cars:  1970 Plymouth Superbird and a new Hellcat Charger and fix the cars I have

Build a garage and attached heated greenhouse

 
 
epistte
7.1  epistte  replied to  charger 383 @7    4 months ago

Build a garage and attached heated greenhouse

I have along wanted a heated greenhouse so I can play around in the winter. I've (unsuccessfully) bred roses but it is hard to do when the only greenhouse that I have is just translucent plastic panels over a 6x12' PVC frame.  I drew up the plans for a barn with a heated greenhouse. Now all I need is 3 acres of land and $200K to have the gardens of my dreams. 

Restoring a steam engine is a large goal for a corporation such as UP or BNSF, so I can't imagine what it would cost for a person or even a group of people.

 
 
charger 383
7.1.1  charger 383  replied to  epistte @7.1    4 months ago

UP is restoring a Big Boy steam locomotive and has an operating steam locomotive they never retired.   I heard it cost $3 million to restore the Norfolk & Western J611 locomotive (I have ridden several trips on that one).  If I had the money fix the other 2 N&W locos and get a Pullman car for me  to ride in

 
 
Greg Jones
7.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  charger 383 @7.1.1    4 months ago

I applaud the UP for retaining and restoring a few of their legacy steam locomotives. Currently only 844 is operating on excursions. The 3985 "Challenger" is currently in the shop awaiting an overhaul while 4014 is their first priority. They want it ready to go in time for the Golden Spike celebration next year somewhere near Promontory, Utah, on the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad.

https://www.up.com/media/releases/170510-great-race.htm

 
 
zuksam
8  zuksam    4 months ago

A Beck or Thunder Ranch Porsche 550 Spyder replica. A 1972 Moto Guzzi 850 Eldorado with the Police package (I used to have one). A 78-79 VW Bus Westfalia popup or a 80's Westy Vanagon popup (I had a 69 Westy popup but the camping package is just so much nicer on the newer versions. 25 Acres and Small House on a large Lake with a 20,000 sf Garage for my toys. and a dock on the lake with a 24ft Party Barge to fish and swim off of or just to take naps in the middle of the Lake. You know I could do this all day but those are the Basics.

 
 
JohnRussell
9  JohnRussell    4 months ago

"Destroy The Ego"

The Buddha

 
 
XDm9mm
10  XDm9mm    4 months ago

Find and restore an original CORD or AVANTI....  hell, both.

 
 
epistte
10.1  epistte  replied to  XDm9mm @10    4 months ago

There was a gold Avanti couple that was own by the postmaster in the town where I grew up. I knew it was different and had to ask somebody what it was.  He retired and I'm not sure what happened to it. 

 
 
sandy-2021492
11  sandy-2021492    4 months ago

I'm not much of a car person, but I'd love a yacht.  Something about being out at sea, out of sight of everything, makes me feel at peace.

 
 
epistte
11.1  epistte  replied to  sandy-2021492 @11    4 months ago

Sail or power?

I learned to sail with an old family friend and I miss the water, especially when I am stressed and need to get away. The sound of water against the hull and the wind in the rigging as the boat silently glides along is almost sexy.

Id love to have a 54' Oyster or even a 45' Hunter sailboat. Catamarans are very efficient and have a lot of room but they just aren't as aesthetically enticing as a big monohull.  I keep looking at the various online classifieds and dream.

 
 
sandy-2021492
11.1.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  epistte @11.1    4 months ago

Probably power.  If we're talking fantasies, my yacht would be sailing around the world, and I'd want to know that I could get around bad weather if the need arose.

Full disclosure - I've only ever been a passenger.  I grew up along the Ohio River, but my parents aren't boat people, so boating wasn't something I grew up with.  I've been on cruise ships, a sternwheeler, a bass boat, a catamaran, and a tall ship, and enjoyed them all, but I don't know enough about them to compare strengths and weaknesses.  Except for the tall ship, which I sailed on in Boston Harbour.  The crew mentioned that every winter, they sailed to the Caribbean.  I thought that would be cool, until I visited the head, which was so tiny that my feet were in the linen closet while I did my thing.

While I wouldn't mind learning to sail, if I were rich enough to buy a yacht, I'd mostly leave the sailing to my skipper and I'd stay on deck, watching the waves.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
11.1.2  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  sandy-2021492 @11.1.1    4 months ago

Two places to stay away from - the Bermuda Triangle and Somalia.

 
 
epistte
11.1.3  epistte  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @11.1.2    4 months ago
Two places to stay away from - the Bermuda Triangle and Somalia.

Sailing to Bermuda from the Carolinas is a dream of mine. Circumnavigation is a dream but the journey from the Red Sea around the horn of Africa is probably the scariest part because of pirates. 

 
 
epistte
11.1.4  epistte  replied to  sandy-2021492 @11.1.1    4 months ago
I've been on cruise ships, a sternwheeler, a bass boat, a catamaran, and a tall ship, and enjoyed them all, but I don't know enough about them to compare strengths and weaknesses.

The biggest cruise ship I have ever been on a is a tourist boat in Cleveland harbor.  Ive seen tall ships but never a sidewheeler or a catamaran. A friend has a kayak that I borrow for weekends in the summer to explore small rivers, streams and lakes.

This is a sexy sailboat,


 
 
sandy-2021492
11.1.5  sandy-2021492  replied to  epistte @11.1.4    4 months ago

The sailboat looks fun.

Sidewheelers and sternwheelers are pretty common on the Ohio.  A few years ago, we took my mom to Blennerhassett Island - an island near Parkersburg, WV with a rebuilt early-America mansion.  The Blennerhassetts were allies of Aaron Burr, so it has some historical significance.  You get to the island from Parkersburg via a sternwheeler.  The return trip was the only time I've actually been scared on the water.  A freak storm came up, and instead of leaving on schedule, the pilot waited for everyone on the island to get back on the boat, and the storm got worse right when we were in the middle of the river.  Water was pouring through the ceiling, ceiling tiles were falling on people's heads, we were listing due to the wind, and water was splashing onto the lower deck.  The pilot finally just stopped and turned us into the wind.  I was a bit ticked at the pilot.  There were plenty of places to shelter safely from the storm on the island.  If he'd left on time instead of waiting, we'd have been docked before the storm got bad.

 
 
epistte
11.1.6  epistte  replied to  sandy-2021492 @11.1.5    4 months ago

I was on a ferry between Marblehead and the Lake Erie islands that got rough. It wasn't as bad as your experience but I'm not a strong swimmer and I was quite scared. 

If you like to relax with a adult beverage on a sailboat this is the ultimate experience. It's virtually your own 4 cabin cruise ship.


 
 
sandy-2021492
11.1.7  sandy-2021492  replied to  epistte @11.1.6    4 months ago

That's what I'm talkin' about.

I'm not a strong swimmer, either, so I can understand why you were scared.

 
 
epistte
11.1.8  epistte  replied to  sandy-2021492 @11.1.7    4 months ago

We were coming back to Marblehead after a day on Kellys Island with the geology club. It was a smooth ride over to the island and great weather on the island but the wind picked up and the temps dropped just at sunset and the lake got very rough.  The waves were almost coming across the deck and I was trying to hide the fact that I was seasick.  It's only about 5 miles wide but I was never so glad to be back on dry land. 

This is a better video of the Lagoon Seventy 7 catamaran.


 
 
sandy-2021492
11.1.9  sandy-2021492  replied to  epistte @11.1.8    4 months ago

Five miles on rough water is pretty scary.  I probably could have swam to the dock from where we were, if I'd had only myself to worry about, because it wasn't that far, and I'd bet the water in the Ohio in summer is warmer than the water in Lake Erie almost any time.

And 5 minutes of seasickness feels like an eternity.  It takes a lot to make me seasick, which is weird, since I sometimes get carsick even when I'm the one driving.

 
 
Explorerdog
11.1.10  Explorerdog  replied to  epistte @11.1.4    4 months ago

Sadly Oyster has gone into liquidation.

 
 
epistte
11.1.11  epistte  replied to  Explorerdog @11.1.10    4 months ago
Sadly Oyster has gone into liquidation.

When did that happen?

 
 
Krishna
12  Krishna    4 months ago

you inherited a million 

Many years ago, a million was a lot of money! 

So many people wished they could be a millionaire.

Now-a-days net worth of a $million isn't all that impressive. Especially for a family of four.

(How many millionaire would you guess are there is the US.? 10? 100? Possibly more...?)

 
 
Krishna
12.1  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @12    4 months ago
(How many millionaire would you guess are there is the US.? 10? 100? Possibly more...?)

No one answered. I had a feeling no one would know (and I have to admit I didn't know either). So I googled it-- back in 2016 there were...10.8 million millionaires!!!

(I wonder...what am I doing wrong? :-)

 
 
epistte
12.1.1  epistte  replied to  Krishna @12.1    4 months ago

You either have ethics or weren't born with it. 

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
12.1.2  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @12.1    4 months ago

I've experienced both being a millionaire and a bankrupt. Unfortunately they were in the wrong order.

 
 
MUVA
12.1.3  MUVA  replied to  Krishna @12.1    4 months ago

Your a leftist try capitalism🙂

 
 
MUVA
12.1.4  MUVA  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @12.1.2    4 months ago

Buzz when I bought the business from my wife's parents we had to take a loan for 2 million dollars.I spent the next ten years working 80 hour weeks then the economy crashed needless to say there was a lot of sleepless nights.

 
 
epistte
12.1.5  epistte  replied to  MUVA @12.1.3    4 months ago
Your a leftist try capitalism

I asked that this thread remain apolitical.

 
 
MUVA
12.1.6  MUVA  replied to  epistte @12.1.5    4 months ago

It was a joke please take a deep breath.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
12.1.7  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  epistte @12.1.5    4 months ago

I'm glad that you've noticed now how interesting and fun an article can be for a lot of NT members and yourself when it has nothing to do with religion or politics.  At this point of time, 17 members have commented.

 
 
Spikegary
12.1.8  Spikegary  replied to  epistte @12.1.5    4 months ago
You either have ethics or weren't born with it. 

Do you not see how things could go downhill when you make a comment like that?

 
 
epistte
12.1.9  epistte  replied to  Spikegary @12.1.8    4 months ago
Do you not see how things could go downhill when you make a comment like that?

Do you think that it is ethical for Jeff Bezos to pay people scab wages for 12 hours of work in unairconditioned warehouses?

Microsoft business practices are far from being ethical, despite the fact that Bill Gates might be a Democrat. 

Apples build phones and such in China with virtual slaves, despite them being seen as a liberal company.

 
 
Krishna
12.1.10  Krishna  replied to  MUVA @12.1.3    4 months ago
Your a leftist try capitalism🙂

Do you have any idea what I do?

You don't.

So I'll tell you-- I'm a trader (Stock market).

And I thinking of starting my own business, probably within the next year . . .

Oooops!!!

 
 
Krishna
12.1.11  Krishna  replied to  epistte @12.1.9    4 months ago
despite the fact that Bill Gates might be a Democrat.

This is a bit off topic, but IMO somewhat interesting:

You will find most of the super-billionaire types are in fact **Democrats** ,or, big Dem donors. Besides Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and Larry Ellison are Democrats too (there's your TOP 3 US billionaires right there.) Then there's Zuckerberg, and Bezos is a known donor to the Dem party. Billionaires are in fact less likely to be Republican, even less likely to be Trump supporters, and virtually none would be Libertarian.

I'm not trying  to start a political argument here-- nor am I trying to pass judgement on anyone. But I just thought that was a fascinating bit a trivia... (I'm an ENTP...and ENTPs love obscure facts! :-)

 
 
epistte
12.1.12  epistte  replied to  Krishna @12.1.11    4 months ago

The only libertarian billionaire that I know of is Peter Thiel. The Kochs inherited most of their money. 

 
 
Krishna
12.1.13  Krishna  replied to  epistte @12.1.12    4 months ago
The only libertarian billionaire that I know of is Peter Thiel. The Kochs inherited most of their money.

John Mackey, the founder of Wholes Foods, is a Libertarian. He is fairly wealthy, but I don't think he's a billionaire.

(Just googled it-- he's net worth is "only" $75 million).

He's a bit pf an eccentric... but his founding of Whole Foods was pretty brilliant. (Fairly recently Amazon bought it-- Whole Foods is now part of Amazon).

 
 
Spikegary
12.1.14  Spikegary  replied to  epistte @12.1.9    4 months ago

Is that what this discussion is about?  You de-rail it (it's your article, so you can do as you please) but get upset when others de-rail.  Seems like the whole 'glass houses/throwing stones' thing.

 
 
epistte
12.1.15  epistte  replied to  Spikegary @12.1.14    4 months ago
You de-rail it (it's your article, so you can do as you please) but get upset when others de-rail.

I'd rather that the thread stays on topic.  I created this thread as an alternative to the constant fighting that is common on NewsTalkers.

 
 
charger 383
12.1.16  charger 383  replied to  epistte @12.1.15    4 months ago

and you did a good job of it

 
 
Old School Marine
13  Old School Marine    4 months ago

This is a 1947 Harley Davidson Knucklehead.  It is the very last year of this amazing classic, in 1948 the Panhead was launched:

47knuck.jpg

 
 
zuksam
13.1  zuksam  replied to  Old School Marine @13    4 months ago

Sweet Bike ! I'll take one of those too.

 
 
Old School Marine
13.1.1  Old School Marine  replied to  zuksam @13.1    4 months ago

Yeah the Knuckle was a true classic and one I've never owned, I've had Panheads and Shovelheads and Sportsters and I know have an Evo, a 1995 Heritage Classic, it's sweet but I'd seriously like to land myself a Knuckle one of these days.  I was able to fulfill another dream and I went to St. John and bought a sailboat and lived on it for a few years, it was an old wood boat, a 1964 Choi Lee, teak over Mahogany, a 40 footer with a 3 cylinder Yanmar powerplant and Manfred Dittrick sails.  Manfred was a legendary sail maker and tragically died a couple years ago after a fall at a place called Yacht Haven Grande on St. Thomas.

 
 
Krishna
13.1.2  Krishna  replied to  Old School Marine @13.1.1    4 months ago
I was able to fulfill another dream and I went to St. John and bought a sailboat and lived on it for a few years, it was an old wood boat, a 1964 Choi Lee, teak over Mahogany, a 40 footer with a 3 cylinder Yanmar powerplant and Manfred Dittrick sails.  Manfred was a legendary sail maker and tragically died a couple years ago after a fall at a place called Yacht Haven Grande on St. Thomas

That's similar to one of my dreams. There's a huge boating scene in that area-- from Florida to various places in the Carribean. I would love to have a sailboat and spend a while traveling around there, from port to port...perhaps also in the Meditteranean, although the political situation there may be much more unsafe than it used to be.

What model boat? I don't know-- I'm not familiar with larger sailboats. One that sleeps 4 probably. I do currently own a sailboat" (if it can be called that :-) but I want a somewhat larger one:

Photo: Alcort Super-Sailfish (1960s?).-- mine is a much older model probably built right after WWII.

supersailfish.jpg

(That is not me-- its a picture I found online)

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
13.1.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @13.1.2    4 months ago

Well, if we're talking boats, ever since I first went with my parents to the Muskoka Lakes in Ontario, and saw the absolutely beautiful Greavette Streamliner boats, I wanted to have one, but I would have to be rich because antique wooden boats cost a fortune to maintain. I once did an article on antique wooden boats, which I think I reposted on the more recent "Boats" group (which has disappeared so I assume the administrator of it deleted his NT membership).  Here's an example of what I mean:

See the source image

 
 
Spikegary
13.1.4  Spikegary  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @13.1.3    4 months ago

That's frigging gorgeous.

 
 
Spikegary
13.1.5  Spikegary  replied to  Krishna @13.1.2    4 months ago

My best friend has a 42 foot Hunter down in Gloucester, Virginia.  I want to set aside some time and go crew with him.....

 
 
Old School Marine
13.1.6  Old School Marine  replied to  Krishna @13.1.2    4 months ago

I'd love to be able to get another sailboat and live on it, it was awesome living on St. John.  My mom took sick real bad however and I wanted to be more readily accessible to her so I sold mine and came back.  But it was quite the adventure learning to sail then sailing around down there.

 
 
Old School Marine
13.1.7  Old School Marine  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @13.1.3    4 months ago

That is a BADASS boat

 
 
PJ5850
13.1.8  PJ5850  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @13.1.3    4 months ago

WOW ! That's a boat

 
 
sandy-2021492
13.1.9  sandy-2021492  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @13.1.3    4 months ago

That is a work of art.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
13.1.10  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  sandy-2021492 @13.1.9    4 months ago

It's a dream..

See the source image

 
 
Krishna
13.1.11  Krishna  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @13.1.3    4 months ago
antique wooden boats cost a fortune to maintain.

I think its any sort of wooden boat. The Sailfish I had was very old-- built if the late 1940s. It was wood. Even on a small boat like there's a lot of maintenance (I owned it jointly with my roomate-- we didn't hire anyone--we did the maintenance ourselves. IIRC lots of sanding and numerous coats of Spar Varnish. 

The newer versions of the Sailfish (and the larger Sunfish) was fiberglass which was much better  

Sunfish:

200px-Sunfish_rigged_for_sailing.jpg

The Sailfish deck was flat-- it was like a big surfboard with a rectangular hole into with you inserted a small centerboard. It could only carry two people. (Everytime we tried three it capsized).

The Sunfish did not have a flat deck-- it had a "cockpit"(see photo, above)-- an indented area where you could put your feet. And its had a capacity of three people.

Our Sailfish was so small and light that we could remove the mast and sail, and two guys could carry it. It could be flipped over and put on a rack on top of a small car. (We wrapped the sail around the mast and secured it on the car top carriers next to the boat). I believe a Sunfiih is to big for a car top carrier-- I think you need a (very small) trailer to transport it.

Once my roomate and I and hos girlfriend's large family drove up to a lake in Canada-- pretty far North (I don't remember the location) where they rented two large cabins cabins every year. In deep woods right on a lake. (Much less expensive then the U.S.). My roomate and I drove all the way up there with the boat on top of the car. It was a big, long narrow lake-- good wind, great for sailing.

 
 
Krishna
13.1.12  Krishna  replied to  Spikegary @13.1.4    4 months ago
That's frigging gorgeous.

Definitely is-- real craftsmanship went into building that.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
13.1.13  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @13.1.11    4 months ago

The lake my waterfront log chalet was on was about 5 miles long and about a mile wide.  Does the name Gull Lake in Haliburton sound familiar. The main town at the North end was Minden.  There are both private and commercial cottages for rent there.

 
 
Steve Ott
14  Steve Ott    4 months ago

1967 corvette 427.jpg

'67 Corvette 427

 
 
Dulay
15  Dulay    4 months ago

1983landrover110defender25tdi2.jpg

 
 
luther28
16  luther28    4 months ago

1967 Chevy Malibu, convertible, 327 ci, 4 spd. There is no substitute.

 
 
Spikegary
17  Spikegary    4 months ago

I have the motorcycle I want.  There's a place in the Adirondack Mountains, a chalet, built over an iold missile silo, has it's own runway (grass) to fly in and out of, so I'd need the money for the chalet, plus the airplane, of course.  I've always wanted a Lambo Countach.  I've been in love with that car since the first time I laid eyes on it.

Silo Chalet.jpg

Lambo.jpg

 
 
epistte
17.1  epistte  replied to  Spikegary @17    4 months ago

 The Diablo or the Murcielago are much better road cars.

 
 
Spikegary
17.1.1  Spikegary  replied to  epistte @17.1    4 months ago

Never had the 'take my breath away' effect like this one did.  One sexy beast.

 
 
epistte
17.1.2  epistte  replied to  Spikegary @17.1.1    4 months ago
Never had the 'take my breath away' effect like this one did.

You're correct. It still turns heads 30+ years later.

 
 
Trout Giggles
18  Trout Giggles    4 months ago

I want a camper. That's all.

 
 
Spikegary
18.1  Spikegary  replied to  Trout Giggles @18    4 months ago

Based on the video of your driveway, I believe this is what you need to satisfy your wants AND needs:

 
 
Trout Giggles
18.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Spikegary @18.1    4 months ago

Awesome!

But can it pull a skiier?

 
 
TTGA
18.1.2  TTGA  replied to  Trout Giggles @18.1.1    4 months ago
But can it pull a skiier?

And, even more to the point, does it have a flux capacitor?

 
 
Trout Giggles
18.1.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  TTGA @18.1.2    4 months ago

YES! Then I can go back to the day I broke my ankle!

 
 
Spikegary
18.1.4  Spikegary  replied to  Trout Giggles @18.1.1    4 months ago

Slowly.

 
 
Trout Giggles
18.1.5  Trout Giggles  replied to  Spikegary @18.1.4    4 months ago

oh, well.

If I can afford that I can afford a boat that I can pull behind the trailer.

 
 
Enoch
19  Enoch    4 months ago

Dear Friend Episette: I have no image to convey this.

The illustrated Sarajevo Haggadah, originating in Barcelona in 1350 is the ritual meal monograph for the spring Freedom Festival of Passover would be a great addition to our home library.

They are rare indeed.

One of the originals is in the National Museum of Bosnia.

The artwork is priceless.

I was once offered a chance to purchase one.

The funds necessary were available to Mrs. E. and myself.

At that time I was CEO of a global concern.

The so called Yom Kippur war of 1973 broke out.

We fleet it was best to use the funds to purchase State of Israel Bonds instead.

We donated the Bonds to various institutions and organizations which cared for combat veterans, their families, including  survivors.

We felt then, as now our decision was the correct one.

This is a fish which got away.

We are at peace with it.

Over the years, as a Rabbi and Chaplain the art treasures Mrs. E. and I co-created in the form of living monuments of people we helped easily dwarf the Haggadah.

At home, we have almost one hundred Maxwell House Coffee Haggadot we keep year around. 

This spring, when we open up our home to generations of families, friends, the homeless, students, people in active service, and anyone else who wishes to join us the real artwork is bringing together a wide diversity of people to celebrate freedom. To remind ourselves of the entailment relationship between freedom and responsibility. And to keep in mond that in every generation there are those who would enslave us for their own purposes. 

There are things worth fighting for in this life.

Freedom is one of them.  

Art inspires us.

So do other things.

Peace, Abundant Blessings and the Freedom to Enjoy Them Unfettered to One and All.

Enoch.  

 
 
epistte
19.1  epistte  replied to  Enoch @19    4 months ago

I looked it up as I had never heard of that artwork.  You made the better choice. 

 
 
Enoch
19.1.1  Enoch  replied to  epistte @19.1    4 months ago

Dear Friend Episette: What the artwork symbolized is very important to Mrs. E. , all our people and me.

Helping others in need who want it, in ways that enhance, not reduce their humanity while respecting their values is always the best choice.

Peace and Abundant Blessings To You and Yours Always.

Enoch.

 
 
Krishna
19.2  Krishna  replied to  Enoch @19    4 months ago
illustrated Sarajevo Haggadah,

Is this the one?

Apparently Barnes and Noble has copies for sale .

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
19.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Enoch @19    4 months ago

Not all (because usually the search engine includes images that are not) but many of these images are from the Sarajevo Haggadah.

http://global.bing.com/images/search?q=illustrated+sarajevo+haggadah+images&qpvt=+illustrated+Sarajevo+Haggadah+images&FORM=IGRE

See the source image

 
 
Krishna
19.3.1  Krishna  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @19.3    4 months ago

Some of those old books are beautiful works of art. And while most of us can't afford to buy original copies (if you can even find any for sale) there are often recently made copies, often very beautiful, which you can buy.

 
 
badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη
20  badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη    4 months ago

I owned a 28ft Formula PC for about 10 years when the kids were young. It cost more than my first house and It cost $1000 to fill with gas. I don't miss the expenses associated with it.

Formula27.png

 
 
Ender
21  Ender    4 months ago

I don't know if I would purchase anything per say. I would just travel the world. Go and see as many places as possible.

 
 
Krishna
21.1  Krishna  replied to  Ender @21    4 months ago
I don't know if I would purchase anything per say. I would just travel the world. Go and see as many places as possible.

I used to travel a lot. Then someone told me about credit cards with frequent flyer programs.Every time you make a purchase with it you rack up miles. When you have enough you can get domestic roundtrip free..except for a tax.. (lst time I beleive the tax was about $20 one way). Out of the country requires more miles than domestic. I once flew from the U.S. to Mexico and back. IIRC the total cost was a tax-- abut $40. (Coming back there were no regular seats so they put me in  first class-- no extra charge. (Usually if you want to fly First Class its still free-- it just takes more Frequent Flyer miles.

I used to put only larger purchases on that card. Now I put everything-- even very inexpensive items. It adds up. I think I have enough now for a free roundtrip to Europe-- plus mayby 2 or 3 domestic flights. I try to use that card for everything.

If you're planning on doing a lot of traveling, its pays to look into different credit cards, see which has the frequent flyer program. (There is also a similar programme for railroads).

 
 
PJ5850
22  PJ5850    4 months ago

My dad purchased a new Corvette in 1958. In 1965 I bought a 1964 GrandPrix 389 4 speed with dual quads for $ 2400, it's the model with the curved back window and eight lug wheels. I inherited the Vette when my dad died. I still own both of these beauties, the Vette has 76,000 miles and the GrandPrix has just under 93,000 miles. My mom had a 1969 Shelby GT 500, when she died in 2003 I couldn't resist the $ 87,000 I was offered for it so I sold it, wish now I still had it.  

 
 
Randy
23  Randy    4 months ago

my dream2.jpgmy dream3.jpgmy dream.jpg

 
 
Randy
23.1  Randy  replied to  Randy @23    4 months ago

The 1973 Lotus Europa. The first time I saw one was on a used car lot in Grand Forks North Dakota when  was stationed up there in the Air Force. It seem some high ranking officer traded it in for a 4X once he realized it was un-driveble on ice. I was 18 years lod, full of testosterone and instantly and madly in love with it, but is was out of my price range and I had just bought my Pinto. I thought my love for it would die as I got older, but I saw one in L.A. just a few years ago in L.A. and another one in Palm Desert about a year ago, both in the same shade of dark blue the one up North was and the overwhelming LUST was still there even stronger then before! I was knocked down with pure desire and need! When I see one all I can think of I have to have one! Now this one is Black, but I can live with that. The car will go 205MPH! And strangely enough there are a bunch of them for sale that need rebuilding (and I do mean a bunch!) that run for about $20K and needing about $60 to $80K worth of work to bring it back up to like new. Of course I would do something sacrilegious when it comes to rebuilding a classic like this. I would put a SiriusXM in it. Wink And I would never have my wife in it, because she would be screaming at me so much she'd ruin the whole experience, especially when I get over 150MPH. Some people just don't know what fun is!

 
 
epistte
23.1.1  epistte  replied to  Randy @23.1    4 months ago

A black with gold Europa is a John Players Special to commemorate their F1 victories.  I was shocked the first time I saw one because they are so low to the ground. They seem to be about hip high. You need to be human origami to get in them.

I love Lotus. The Exige S 240 is a dream of mine.

 
 
Randy
23.1.2  Randy  replied to  epistte @23.1.1    4 months ago
Exige S 240

A beautiful machine indeed! I too love Lotus and have ever since I saw the Europa for the first time. You are sure right about it being low to the ground! The dealer knew I couldn't afford it (it was only 1 year old), but he let me sit in the driver's seat anyway and getting in it was a adventure, but once I was in it felt perfect. You are almost sitting on the ground, with your legs sticking deep under the dash board which since the engine was behind you made you feel like if you got into an accident your legs being gone for good.  The interior console in middle cradles your arm on soft leather pads and your hand just naturally falls on the shiftier. The shiftier had a very, very short throw and you felt like you could almost go from gear to gear with just moving your wrist. Several years ago I had a Porsche 924S and it felt the same way. The dealer told that you don't get into a Porsche, you put one on and man was he right! Like a Lotus you felt like you were wearing it! It fit like a glove and everything was right at your fingertips. Wonderful!

My wife had a new Corvette and while it was fast and fun to drive, it couldn't come near to my Porsche when it came to handling. I used to throw it into corners hard out in the desert roads (we lived North of Scottsdale, AZ then) and actually tried to sneak up on it's breaking lose point and I could never find it. The damn thing stuck like Velcro to the road. I have always loved sports cars and have mostly owned them all of my adult life. A Camaro, a TransAm,  three fast topless Mercedes, five Mustangs, the Porsche, etc. I have had a few "Dad and Mom" cars when my kids were young, but I also usually had a sport car, usually a Mustang GT as I was going through my Mustang phase when they were kids. And a winter "beater" so I didn't have to drive my good car on the roads in the winter because Michigan uses a LOT of salt on the roads in the winter. It makes driving a lot easier, but your car started showing rust within 4 years.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
23.1.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  epistte @23.1.1    4 months ago

A member of a Rock band who was my client way back then was a little guy, and I couldn't figure out how even HE could get into his Lotus.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
23.1.4  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Randy @23.1    4 months ago
"And strangely enough there are a bunch of them for sale that need rebuilding (and I do mean a bunch!)"

But isn't that a kind of red flag?

 
 
Randy
23.1.5  Randy  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @23.1.3    4 months ago

With the door open you reach into the car and grasp the steering wheel with your right hand. Then using the steering wheel to balance yourself you put you right leg in and move your butt over and down like you are going to sit down on the ground because that is how you will end up when you are done except up just a few inches higher. Then again using the steering wheel to balance yourself you start to slide your butt over toward the seat at, being careful to duck down your head onto your chest. When you are sure most of your body is in, you pull your left foot in a straight into the foot portion of the cockpit and sit. Remember that, since a Lotus engine is behind you, the place for your legs and where the pedals are is far in front of you because you are sitting down flat. Your legs are straight out in front of you, so you have the sensation your feet are far under the front part of the car and some people have a difficult time getting used to the feel. Some people also don't like the way you have to operate the pedals since you have to push them almost straight forward to operate the clutch, fuel and brake pedals. Some people never do, so before you drop a chunk of serious money on a supercar be sure wouldn't get uncomfortable driving it real soon. Some are smooth a silk, but some of them you feel the entire road, which some people prefer (I do) as they have the increased sensation for serious hot rodding

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
23.1.6  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Randy @23.1.5    4 months ago

From your description, it's almost as if you'd be rubbing your ass on the pavement.

 
 
Randy
23.1.7  Randy  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @23.1.4    4 months ago
But isn't that a kind of red flag?

I don't think so? I mean they were poplar when they were being sold, though mostly in Europe  But they are sort of a small cult car for rebuilding supercars like a Lotus. There are other cars that our just a lot more popular for rebuilding. Other classic car future owners will grab a T-Bird or a '57 Chevy Bel Air first. As a rule there just doesn't seem to be too many people interested in rebuilding older foreign exotic sports cars. I have no idea why? Maybe they just like rebuilding American cars more and think a foreign exotic would be too complicated? It's just that, for some reason, most people who want a classic car, want an American one and not a foreign one.

Isn't the speedometer a little small for a car that can go over 200 mph?

Yes they are, but the numbers are all thre. I believe (if I remebr right) the speedomiteer went up to 225. The numbers on both the pedo and the Tach are

 
 
Randy
23.1.8  Randy  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @23.1.4    4 months ago
But isn't that a kind of red flag?

I don't think so? I mean they were popular when they were being sold, though mostly in Europe  But they are sort of a small cult car for rebuilding supercars like a Lotus. There are other cars that our just a lot more popular for rebuilding. Other classic car future owners will grab a T-Bird or a '57 Chevy Bel Air first. As a rule there just doesn't seem to be too many people interested in rebuilding older foreign exotic sports cars. I have no idea why? Maybe they just like rebuilding American cars more and think a foreign exotic would be too complicated? It's just that, for some reason, most people who want a classic car, want an American one and not a foreign one. Maybe they are old when rebuilding one (or having a rebuilt for them, which is what I would do) and don't think their back would be up to the small, very low and not so comfortable seats in a foreign exotic? But the high up and very easy to get into and very soft seats of a custom built '32 Chevy Hot Rod, now that's comfortable!

Isn't the speedometer a little small for a car that can go over 200 mph?

Yes they are, but the numbers are all there. I believe (if I remember right) the speedometer went up to 225. The numbers on both the speedo and the Tach are both small.

 
 
Hal A. Lujah
23.1.9  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  Randy @23.1.8    4 months ago

I’ve seen a lot of Elises in my area over the last few years.  It’s a cool car, and actually somewhat affordable.  You can pick up a used one for as low as 20k.

A588C8BEFD504DDBAF52E695AF94AFF2.jpeg

 
 
Randy
23.1.10  Randy  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @23.1.6    4 months ago
From your description, it's almost as if you'd be rubbing your ass on the pavement.

That's how it feels. I have never had a Lotus, but I did have a Porsche 924S and it was almost as low to the ground as the Lotus. As the dealer said, you don't get into a Porsche, you put one on. And when you are in either car you do feel like you are wearing it. Like it has become an extension of your body The command of it is almost instinctual.

 
 
epistte
23.1.11  epistte  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @23.1.4    4 months ago
But isn't that a kind of red flag?

Lotus have never been reliable as Japanese or now Korean imports. The new ones are better because they tend to use drivetrains f borrowed from Toyota, but they till have their problems.  A friend of mine loved British cars but in the 1980s he said to never drive them any farther than you are willing to walk back or ask a friend to pick you up when your car assumes the Lotus position at the side of the road. He had a rule that when he drives his MG-TF that he always wore comfortable shoes, just in case. 

 
 
epistte
23.1.12  epistte  replied to  Randy @23.1.10    4 months ago
That's how it feels. I have never had a Lotus, but I did have a Porsche 924S and it was almost as low to the ground as the Lotus. As the dealer said, you don't get into a Porsche, you put one on. And when you are in either car you do feel like you are wearing it. Like it has become an extension of your body The command of it is almost instinctual.

I almost bought a used Porsche 924s in 1992.   I was looking for a used car after my car had been totaled in an accident and I saw this car on a VW/Honda dealers lot. He wanted $8500 for it. I had it checked out and it was in decent shape but needed minor mechanical maintenance (timing and balance shaft belts, water pump, motor mounts). I tried to use the needed maintenance as a bargaining chip but the dealer wouldn't budge even $50.00. 

 I looked at a cheap 928 when I was in college until I discovered that it was a grey market car. They are almost impossible to get parts for and often are a bear to change registration because of their illicit past.

I still want either a 924s or a 944 turbo and convert them into a replica of a 924GT. The real 924 GTs are quite rare so as to be museums pieces and not to be driven on the road.   I'm not sure if it would be cheaper to add a turbo engine and the bolt on the bodywork to the 924S or to add the older 924GT bodywork and backdate the interior to the 944 turbo. 

 
 
XDm9mm
23.1.13  XDm9mm  replied to  epistte @23.1.12    4 months ago

Years back, 1979 time frame, a co-worker bought a 1974 Porsche (I think it was a Carrera) for $50.00 (yeah FIFTY bucks).

He saw the ad in the paper and thought it was a typo.  Called and the woman who answered said that's the price, plus there's other stuff available.  Needless to say, he hauled ass over and was like a kid in a candy store.  The car, really high end stereo gear, cameras and even some clothes that actually fit.  He walked out spending less than $500.00.

Apparently, 'hubby' left a note that he was leaving for another woman and to sell everything "for whatever you can get for it".  Well she did, and he bought it.

THEN he started dating the woman.   I left NY Telephone not too much after that but I heard from other guys I kept in touch with that they got married a few years later.

 
 
epistte
23.1.14  epistte  replied to  XDm9mm @23.1.13    4 months ago
Years back, 1979 time frame, a co-worker bought a 1974 Porsche (I think it was a Carrera) for $50.00 (yeah FIFTY bucks).

A 1974 Carerra in good condition is now a 6 figure car. The air-cooled cars are now highly sought after by boomers and Gen-Xers. 

https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1041243/1974-porsche-911-carrera-2-7-for-sale-in-red-bluff-california-96080
 
 
Randy
23.1.15  Randy  replied to  epistte @23.1.12    3 months ago
I almost bought a used Porsche 924s in 1992.

The 924S is still a great car as a second car if you can find one in great shape or one that doesn't need a lot to bring it up to speed. Mine was a 1986 with the solid moon roof in that almost aluminum sliver that Porsche does so well. The one problem with them is that they have a single timing belt that needs to be replaced about every 40,000 miles or you will be sorry. I didn't and my wife was driving it and the timing belt went out and it crushed the valves. Coast me a nearly $3,000 engine rebuild. Ran great after that though! When you are cruising in it and you hit about 90 the car comes alive. I am not kidding. At that speed it becomes like you are driving a whole different car that has been hidden! It sounds like you are in a small plane of some type and it handles and feels so smooth at that speed. It's like it was born to run that speed and above and if you have one or the 944 or the 928 be sure you know a a really long piece of open road where you can take it and really stretch it's legs like that. It's an experience not to be missed.

Porsche's were meant to be driven fast and while they are fun to drive around town and such, you can never, ever really appreciate the car it was designed to be until you take it where you can drive it fast. In every one a very, very fast and fun car is sleeping. Wake it up once in awhile.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
23.2  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Randy @23    4 months ago

Isn't the speedometer a little small for a car that can go over 200 mph?  But then, maybe for a car like that the numbers don't even start until 60 mph.

 
 
nightwalker
24  nightwalker    4 months ago

Changed my mind for a cheaper option. Have enough to build a 2 story cabin in the woods, medium sized chain link fenced yard close to a medium sized all year snow melt creek 10'+ wide that I run a water-wheel for electricity and other uses backing up the roof solar panels. A good sized fireplace, maybe another in the master bedroom and guest room. Wood burning stove. A large root cellar for storage.

 Of course, I want a lot of the achreage around the place, and would build a cooking grill in the back yard and a stone lined fire pit just out of sight of the cabin for light camping and picnics and probably spend a lot of time in the summer wandering out in the woods looking for dead, infected, or "tight" clumps of trees to thin out and use for firewood. Or just wandering along behind the little animals.

   And a nice tricked out just a little F250 4X4 to do the long trip in and out without roads for supplies and drag trees to where I'll cut them up. Amazing what you can do with a bow saw when you're not in a hurry but I know how to use a chainsaw if I have to.

Satellite connections for entertainment, if'n I don't feel like going to town (it has to have a airport so when I feel like roaming I can.) 

LOL If I gave it some thought, I'm sure I could improve on those plans, like a outbuilding where I could experiment with a still, having a good recipe for mash from my 6 times removed great aunt in Salem, and a plan for the workings.

If I didn't blow myself up, might make the next Jim Beam.

 
 
Buzz of the Orient
24.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  nightwalker @24    4 months ago

For years I dreamed of converting this old grist mill to just what you wrote about in your first paragraph. I didn't know until recently when I posted my Famous Photographers photo-essay about Mangelsen that he was the photographer who took that photo.

?id=1199376&maxw=495&maxh=660

 
 
sandy-2021492
24.1.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @24.1    4 months ago

Babcock State Park, in my home state of West Virginia.

 
 
nightwalker
24.1.2  nightwalker  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @24.1    3 months ago

Wow! That would be the prettiest and one of the most pleasant places to live I've ever seen. I think you'd have plenty of room inside. That water wheel is plenty big enough to have all kinds of uses and Ill bet you'd repair or rebuild it not replace it with a newer one. What newer one would look that good anyway?

 
 
nightwalker
24.1.3  nightwalker  replied to  nightwalker @24.1.2    3 months ago

Yeah, and forget the fence. That place would be perfect without. Besides, look where I'm living now...

a45469qal4orkuvxb.jpg

 
 
Old School Marine
25  Old School Marine    4 months ago

Love all the sweet rides being posted here.  Of course Harley is my thing, but if I had 100K to blow shamelessly, I think I'd have to grab one of these Shelby Cobra F-150's

Shelby Truck.jpg

 
 

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