The Rise of Artificial Freedom

  
Via:  make-america-great-again  •  7 months ago  •  69 comments

The Rise of Artificial Freedom
Apparently not recognizing the absurdity of censoring an organization for writing about censorship, Google shut down the ads and told Claremont there would be “no appeal.” Claremont’s offense? The discussion of multiculturalism and speech codes on its website. Eventually, Google relented. But only after Claremont went public did Google back down and acknowledge a “mistake.” But this “mistake” isn’t an isolated incident. This censorship episode comes right on the heels of a similar one...

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


In multiple settings, we are seeing a trend toward narrowing the scope of opinions allowed in the public arena. Heading into high school and college commencement season, a rising tide of ideological censorship is drowning out diversity of opinion. And academia leads the way in defining acceptable thought. 

This means that as the number of “disinvitations” for conservative speakers piles up, the idea that speech equates to violence is gaining purchase. Silencing different viewpoints is not only growing on campuses, it’s also spreading to the tech world and the corporate arena. 

This week Google censored the Claremont Institute, a highly regarded conservative think tank with a 40-year track record of defending American founding principles such as freedom of speech and religion. Claremont recently launched a campaign to raise awareness of illiberal speech codes and their threat to freedom; at the same time, the institute started online advertising for its upcoming anniversary dinner. 

Apparently not recognizing the absurdity of censoring an organization for writing about censorship, Google shut down the ads and told Claremont there would be “no appeal.” Claremont’s offense? The discussion of multiculturalism and speech codes on its website. 

Eventually, Google relented. But only after Claremont went public did Google back down and acknowledge a “mistake.” 

But this “mistake” isn’t an isolated incident. This censorship episode comes right on the heels of a similar one aimed at the president of the Heritage Foundation, Kay Coles James. In April, Google formed – and then within a week disbanded -- an advisory committee related to its work on artificial intelligence. It said the panel was intended to bring “diverse perspectives” to bear on issues in this rapidly evolving area of innovation and invited James to serve on it. 

Mrs. James is by any measure a proven leader, having served at the highest levels of government, academia and the nonprofit sector. She also established the Gloucester Institute to train and mentor young black leaders, and has a career marked by explicitly defending the human dignity of every individual. 

But James is also conservative. And so a band of five Google employees began circulating a petition calling for her ouster. 

Ironically, the petition cited the need for the AI panel to address “historical patterns of discrimination and exclusion.” If anyone knows discrimination and exclusion, it’s James, who suffered verbal and physical abuse as she helped desegregate a middle school in the South as a teen. 

Doubling down on the irony, the petition lamented that AI “doesn’t ‘hear’ more feminine voices, and doesn’t ‘see’ women of color.” Still, because Mrs. James holds some policy views that differ from theirs, she was deemed not to have a “valid perspective worthy of inclusion.” 

The Googlers refused to see her, or hear her, in her own voice. That’s discrimination and exclusion in action. The takeaway message is clear: Diversity means agreeing with us. Disagreeing with us is intolerance and even “violence.” 

As a civil society, we are careening toward ideological balkanization. This trend of labeling opinions with which we disagree as dangerous and hateful threatens Americans’ foundational freedoms. Charges of dangerous speech are laid as an exercise in bullying and raw power. 

This tide of bigotry and intimidation is not limited to America. The noted English philosopher and public intellectual Sir Roger Scruton was recently fired from a government housing commission after being accused of anti-Semitic and Islamophobic comments. The charges were leveled after a lengthy interview with The New Statesman

For three weeks, while Scruton was being pilloried, the paper refused to release the tape of the interview. But Douglas Murray of National Review Institute obtained a copy of the tape and forced the paper to release a transcript. Not surprisingly, Scruton’s actual words did not match the reported description. But he has not been reinstated. 

Make no mistake, once the totalitarian impulse is tolerated, and cloaked in sanctimony, its targets will be far-ranging. And, well, diverse. 

For example, a group of students at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia launched a protest against the noted feminist scholar and tenured professor Camille Paglia. Like Google, they began a petition demanding that Paglia be fired and replaced by a “queer person of color.” Notably, Paglia is a lesbian who has described herself as transgender. Yet the protesters charged her with making “dangerous” comments about people who identify as transgendered. 

The only actual comment cited in the petition—“I question whether the transgender choice is genuine in every single case”— is a heavily caveated statement, and yet the campus censors still labeled her views unacceptable. 

With this cultural creep toward oppression, we are losing something that has been essential to the core of the American identity. To his credit, the president of the University of the Arts, David Yager, responded to the Paglia controversy by stating: “I firmly believe that limiting the range of voices in society erodes our democracy.” 

This is a critical point: If valuing diversity and pluralism is to have any meaning, we cannot label opinions with which we disagree as “discrimination” as a way of silencing someone with a different viewpoint. 

Affirming a robust interpretation of the First Amendment and freedom of speech will sometimes require uncomfortable conversations. But living with -- even valuing -- this kind of discomfort is part of the American DNA and is at the heart of respect and civility. 

We can do better. We may be advancing rapidly in artificial intelligence, but we are regressing toward artificial freedoms.


Charmaine Yoest is vice president of the Institute of Family, Community and Opportunity at The Heritage Foundation (heritage.org).


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Heartland American
1  seeder  Heartland American    7 months ago

“Mrs. James is by any measure a proven leader, having served at the highest levels of government, academia and the nonprofit sector. She also established the Gloucester Institute to train and mentor young black leaders, and has a career marked by explicitly defending the human dignity of every individual. 

But James is also conservative. And so a band of five Google employees began circulating a petition calling for her ouster. 

Ironically, the petition cited the need for the AI panel to address “historical patterns of discrimination and exclusion.” If anyone knows discrimination and exclusion, it’s James, who suffered verbal and physical abuse as she helped desegregate a middle school in the South as a teen. 

Doubling down on the irony, the petition lamented that AI “doesn’t ‘hear’ more feminine voices, and doesn’t ‘see’ women of color.” Still, because Mrs. James holds some policy views that differ from theirs, she was deemed not to have a “valid perspective worthy of inclusion.” 

The Googlers refused to see her, or hear her, in her own voice. That’s discrimination and exclusion in action. The takeaway message is clear: Diversity means agreeing with us. Disagreeing with us is intolerance and even “violence.” 

As a civil society, we are careening toward ideological balkanization. This trend of labeling opinions with which we disagree as dangerous and hateful threatens Americans’ foundational freedoms. Charges of dangerous speech are laid as an exercise in bullying and raw power. 

This tide of bigotry and intimidation is not limited to America. The noted English philosopher and public intellectual Sir Roger Scruton was recently fired from a government housing commission after being accused of anti-Semitic and Islamophobic comments. The charges were leveled after a lengthy interview with The New Statesman

For three weeks, while Scruton was being pilloried, the paper refused to release the tape of the interview. But Douglas Murray of National Review Institute obtained a copy of the tape and forced the paper to release a transcript. Not surprisingly, Scruton’s actual words did not match the reported description. But he has not been reinstated. 

Make no mistake, once the totalitarian impulse is tolerated, and cloaked in sanctimony, its targets will be far-ranging. And, well, diverse. 

For example, a group of students at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia launched a protest against the noted feminist scholar and tenured professor Camille Paglia. Like Google, they began a petition demanding that Paglia be fired and replaced by a “queer person of color.” Notably, Paglia is a lesbian who has described herself as transgender. Yet the protesters charged her with making “dangerous” comments about people who identify as transgendered. 

The only actual comment cited in the petition—“I question whether the transgender choice is genuine in every single case”— is a heavily caveated statement, and yet the campus censors still labeled her views unacceptable. 

With this cultural creep toward oppression, we are losing something that has been essential to the core of the American identity. To his credit, the president of the University of the Arts, David Yager, responded to the Paglia controversy by stating: “I firmly believe that limiting the range of voices in society erodes our democracy.” 

This is a critical point: If valuing diversity and pluralism is to have any meaning, we cannot label opinions with which we disagree as “discrimination” as a way of silencing someone with a different viewpoint.”

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1  Tessylo  replied to  Heartland American @1    6 months ago

Another 'I am a perpetual victim' seed

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2  Bob Nelson    7 months ago

Google is a private company. Google may refuse access to its pages to whomever it pleases, on whatever grounds it pleases.

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.1  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Bob Nelson @2    7 months ago

“With this cultural creep toward oppression, we are losing something that has been essential to the core of the American identity. To his credit, the president of the University of the Arts, David Yager, responded to the Paglia controversy by stating: “I firmly believe that limiting the range of voices in society erodes our democracy.” 

This is a critical point: If valuing diversity and pluralism is to have any meaning, we cannot label opinions with which we disagree as “discrimination” as a way of silencing someone with a different viewpoint. 

Affirming a robust interpretation of the First Amendment and freedom of speech will sometimes require uncomfortable conversations. But living with -- even valuing -- this kind of discomfort is part of the American DNA and is at the heart of respect and civility.”

 
 
 
katrix
2.1.1  katrix  replied to  Heartland American @2.1    7 months ago
But living with -- even valuing -- this kind of discomfort is part of the American DNA and is at the heart of respect and civility.”

Hahahahaha!  Too bad you're incapable of living that way yourself, without screeching about persecution.

 
 
 
epistte
2.1.2  epistte  replied to  Heartland American @2.1    7 months ago
Affirming a robust interpretation of the First Amendment and freedom of speech will sometimes require uncomfortable conversations. But living with -- even valuing -- this kind of discomfort is part of the American DNA and is at the heart of respect and civility.”

The right of free speech only applies to the government fining or jailing you for your speech. It does not apply to private property or private corporations because doing so would override the equal free speech rights of the person or corporation.    How would you like it if a person can onto your property and erected a sign for their speech that you disagreed with and you could not do anything about it?

 If you don't like Googles or other platforms TOS then create your own Conserva-Google where you can do as you wish.  That is the capitalist way.

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.1.3  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  katrix @2.1.1    7 months ago

I call it as I see it, Google, Twitter,  and Facebook pc speech codes be damned.  

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.1.4  Bob Nelson  replied to  Heartland American @2.1.3    7 months ago
I call it as I see it...

You can call it however you please. Unfortunately for you, your opinion is of no legal consequence

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.1.5  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  epistte @2.1.2    7 months ago

if they can tell a baker florist photographer etc. whom he/she must serve and how then they can tell those who provide internet news or social media talk/discussions sites to allow all points of view to be expressed on their platforms or they should just get out of the business if they don’t like it or disagree.  Tech service providers should be held to the same standards they want to hold the baker to. Viewpoint discrimination in social media should be a crime with real fines and prison time behind it.  

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.1.6  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.1.4    7 months ago

The difference is that I would get kicked off of Facebook for expressing my point of view and you wouldn’t for expressing yours.  

 
 
 
epistte
2.1.7  epistte  replied to  Heartland American @2.1.5    7 months ago
if they can tell a baker florist photographer etc. whom he/she must serve and how then they can tell those who provide internet news or social media talk/discussions sites to allow all points of view to be expressed on their platforms or they should just get out of the business if they don’t like it or disagree.  Tech service providers should be held to the same standards they want to hold the baker to. Viewpoint discrimination in social media should be a crime with real fines and prison time behind it.  

You are not paying Google or other internet platforms.  

 You must have very extreme views because Facebook only bans people when those views cross the line of speech to threats or profanity.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.1.8  Bob Nelson  replied to  Heartland American @2.1.6    7 months ago
I would get kicked off of Facebook for expressing my point of view and you wouldn’t for expressing yours.

What? Is Facebook going to filter out "nonsense"?

I doubt it. Nonsense makes up a pretty big portion of their traffic.

 
 
 
epistte
2.1.9  epistte  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.1.8    7 months ago
What? Is Facebook going to filter out "nonsense"? I doubt it. Nonsense makes up a pretty big portion of their traffic.

I'd say +85% of it. Nonsense and advertising.

 
 
 
Gordy327
2.1.10  Gordy327  replied to  Heartland American @2.1.5    6 months ago
if they can tell a baker florist photographer etc. whom he/she must serve

That's not a free speech issue. But it is a false equivalency.

Tech service providers should be held to the same standards they want to hold the baker to. Viewpoint discrimination in social media should be a crime with real fines and prison time behind it.

I thought you were for free market? Now you want government interference?

The difference is that I would get kicked off of Facebook for expressing my point of view and you wouldn’t for expressing yours

That means your views violate FB rules. Much like they sometimes do here too. Maybe you should follow the rules! Then you wouldn't be kicked out. See, easy!

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.11  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Heartland American @2.1.3    6 months ago
"I call it as I see it, Google, Twitter,  and Facebook pc speech codes be damned."

They are dangerous - Big Brother personified.  I think Zuckerberg is the most dangerous man in the world - he can virtually control the attitudes of the masses, thanks to proliferation of the internet.  China does not tolerate their "guiding of the minds of the multitude" and has banned and blocked all of them.

 
 
 
TTGA
2.1.12  TTGA  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1.11    6 months ago
China does not tolerate their "guiding of the minds of the multitude" and has banned and blocked all of them.

Buzz, do you realize that China does exactly the same thing using their mainstream media sources, a large army, police and "reeducation" camps?  Being there as a non offensive (non political) foreigner, you're probably not exposed to that and may not even notice that it's happening.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.13  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  TTGA @2.1.12    6 months ago

Maybe so. Over the almost 13 years I've been here I've lived in 3 different cities, got to know and be familiar with many many people of all walks of life.  I have never heard ANYONE say ANYTHING indicating that they were unhappy here.  Although I do recall that during those 13 years there have been one or two mass terrorist attacks by Uyghurs, and a few incidents of people with deranged minds making attacks with cleavers, I have not seen incidents of violence that would exceed a couple of drivers who were arguing on the street about an accident they just had - shouting at each other, no physical violence. In other words, TTGA, except for the government's need to control the possibility of political violence in the north-west of China, I think it's a lot safer to live here among people who are generally polite, almost docile, rather than in a country that experiences shootings every single day.

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.1.14  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Gordy327 @2.1.10    6 months ago

Really? My views violate the rules.  Isn’t that what you said.  Those words are  clear advocacy for viewpoint discrimination and the bigotry that stands behind it.  

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.1.15  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1.11    6 months ago

on that one matter, China might be right.

 
 
 
Gordy327
2.1.16  Gordy327  replied to  Heartland American @2.1.14    6 months ago
Really? My views violate the rules.  

Check with FB. If you're being deleted, it's probably because you're violating some rule. not a difficult concept to grasp.

Isn’t that what you said.  

Check my post again if you're unsure.

Those words are  clear advocacy for viewpoint discrimination and the bigotry that stands behind it.  

And that's clear whining!

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.2  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Bob Nelson @2    7 months ago

Nothing like a socialist defending the ability of capitalism to act as it pleases at any time for any reason.  Bakers, florists, planners, calligraphers, photographers should all have the same when it comes to who they provide their services as well, right?  

 
 
 
katrix
2.2.1  katrix  replied to  Heartland American @2.2    7 months ago
Bakers, florists, planners, calligraphers, photographers should all have the same when it comes to who they provide their services as well, right?  

No, a public service is not free to discriminate against anyone.  Why some people get so upset when they can't persecute others or discriminate against them is beyond me - it's such an un-Christian attitude.

 
 
 
epistte
2.2.2  epistte  replied to  Heartland American @2.2    7 months ago
Nothing like a socialist defending the ability of capitalism to act as it pleases at any time for any reason.  Bakers, florists, planners, calligraphers, photographers should all have the same when it comes to who they provide their services as well, right?  

Socialism is an economic idea of the workers owning the means of production. Socialism makes no claim of government power as you are trying to claim to construct a conservative strawman.  You continually confuse socialist with authoritarian, despite the fact that many of us progressives have educated you on your mistake. 

 If those bakers/florists/photogs' operate a business that is open to the public then they must serve all of the public equally, despite their religious objections to their customer's activities or beliefs. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.2.3  Bob Nelson  replied to  epistte @2.2.2    7 months ago
You continually confuse...

When a person persists in repeating the same error, after dozens of explanations, there are only two explanations possible:
- the person is too stupid to learn,
- the person understood long ago, and continues in pure bad faith.

I don't see any other explanation.

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.2.4  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  katrix @2.2.1    7 months ago

What makes you think internet service providers are any different and shouldn’t be held to the same standards as a brick and mortar business when it comes to discrimination?  

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
2.3  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Bob Nelson @2    7 months ago
Google may refuse access to its pages to whomever it pleases, on whatever grounds it pleases.

That's not entirely correct. They are still subject to public accommodation laws that ban discrimination based on race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, age, sexual orientation (including transgender status), physical or mental disability. There is no protected status for any type of content. You can't discriminate against a gay citizen banning their ability to use specific apps but you could choose to ban certain content such as gay pornography or sexually explicit material. The same is true for conservatives. They can't ban you based on your being Republican or a hard line evangelical YEC, but they can decide not to host your content that violates the app or websites CoC such as posting known lies about the age of the earth, making vile racists attacks or using the platform to viciously attack other users based on their sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, faith or lack thereof.

So while nothing they are doing right now is illegal or even unethical, they cannot just refuse service to anyone for any reason as many dishonest prejudiced conservatives are finding out when they refuse to serve fellow law abiding tax paying American citizens because they believe what their perspective clients do in the privacy of their own homes is their business. Funny how their conscience lets them serve divorcees, adulterers, fornicators and others who don't live up to any sort of biblical life standards, but they selectively choose to discriminate against gays just like they used to selectively discriminate against black Americans and other brown skinned ethnicity's.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.3.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @2.3    7 months ago
They are still subject to public accommodation laws that ban discrimination based on race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, age, sexual orientation (including transgender status), physical or mental disability.

True.

There is no protected status for any type of content.

Also true... and this is the point.

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.3.2  Sunshine  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @2.3    7 months ago
There is no protected status for any type of content.

Such as the writings and artistic work on a cake.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.3.3  Bob Nelson  replied to  Sunshine @2.3.2    7 months ago

That’s not speech.

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.3.4  Sunshine  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.3.3    7 months ago

Did you not read this....

There is no protected status for any type of content. You can't discriminate against a gay citizen banning their ability to use specific apps but you could choose to ban certain content such as gay pornography or sexually explicit material.

A picture of gay or heterosexual porn is speech?

If Facebook, a private entity, can ban context so can bakers, etc.

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.3.5  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Sunshine @2.3.2    7 months ago

Or the artistic expressions of calligraphy.. or the artistic expression in a bouquet 💐 of flowers or a photo.  

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.3.6  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.3.3    7 months ago

Actually it is. A California court has already ruled it so.  

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.3.7  Bob Nelson  replied to  Sunshine @2.3.4    7 months ago
Did you not read this....

Yes, I did. Did you? You don't seem to have understood it.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.3.8  Bob Nelson  replied to  Heartland American @2.3.6    7 months ago

Two things, C4P,:
- if you Reply to a post that's more than two spaces up the conversation, without including the relevant quote, I won't go hunting,
- an affirmation without a link is worthless.

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.3.9  Sunshine  replied to  Heartland American @2.3.5    7 months ago

It is only "fair".  It seems "fairness" only applies to certain groups.

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.3.10  Sunshine  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.3.7    7 months ago

I understand completely...obviously you don't.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.3.11  Bob Nelson  replied to  Sunshine @2.3.10    7 months ago

      jrSmiley_79_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.3.12  Sunshine  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.3.11    7 months ago

384

 
 
 
epistte
2.3.13  epistte  replied to  Sunshine @2.3.2    7 months ago
Such as the writings and artistic work on a cake.

That is the free speech of the client and can only be removed it is can be judged by community stands to be obscene. The couples and name and date are not examples of obscene speech. Most wedding cakes have little to no writing on them because they are not a birthday or retirement cake.

 
 
 
Gordy327
2.3.14  Gordy327  replied to  epistte @2.3.13    6 months ago
That is the free speech of the client and can only be removed it is can be judged by community stands to be obscene.

Actually, the provider of that particular service is not obligated to write anything they disagree with. That falls under free speech. However, that is a different matter than providing the actual service itself.

 
 
 
epistte
2.3.15  epistte  replied to  Gordy327 @2.3.14    6 months ago
Actually, the provider of that particular service is not obligated to write anything they disagree with. That falls under free speech. However, that is a different matter than providing the actual service itself.

I doubt that the courts would agree that the customer's name and the date are offensive to a rational person.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
2.4  Thrawn 31  replied to  Bob Nelson @2    7 months ago
Google is a private company. Google may refuse access to its pages to whomever it pleases, on whatever grounds it pleases.

Yep, abide by the ToS or you can be banned. No one is forcing anyone to use Google. I use Google because IMO it is the best search engine out there. It is that whole, strange free market thing that some conservatives seem to have decided to completely abandon.

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.4.1  Sunshine  replied to  Thrawn 31 @2.4    7 months ago

I like DuckDuckGo myself.  DuckDuckGo gives a more broader and unbias result.

 
 
 
Heartland American
2.4.2  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Sunshine @2.4.1    7 months ago

I’ll have to try it.  I mostly use Bing because Microsoft largely stays out of the censorship business unlike many internet providers even if their ownership is liberal. I’m waiting for and looking forward to the debut of 1776 free which I will use exclusively here. USA Life is competing vs Facebook now.  

 
 
 
Sunshine
2.4.3  Sunshine  replied to  Heartland American @2.4.2    7 months ago

Conservatives who are banned from Facebook are also looking at other options.

https://www.foxnews.com/tech/banned-from-facebook-new-pro-trump-social-network-offers-alternative

Addison Riddleberger, the founder of the new platform, told Fox News he’s still in the dark about why Facebook disabled his account 24 hours before the midterm elections, shutting down his pages “Standing for Americans,” “Freedom Catalog,” and “Patriotic Folks.”
 
 
 
Bob Nelson
3  Bob Nelson    7 months ago
 a robust interpretation of the First Amendment and freedom of speech

Do not apply. Not at all. Zero. Nada. Zilch.

Is your comprehension of the Constitution really at this level?

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
3.1  Sean Treacy  replied to  Bob Nelson @3    7 months ago
ot apply. Not at all. Zero. Nada. Zilch

Really? How was President Trump's use of Twitter's the block feature a First Amendment case? Amazing how the same people so upset by that now rush to defend a corporation's right to control speech. 

Is your comprehension of the Constitution really at this level?

Liberals are currently arguing that social media platforms are public forums.  You should go insult your brethren making this argument in Federal Courts. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.1.1  Tessylo  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1    7 months ago

Private companies have a RIGHT TO BLOCK HATE SPEECH ON THEIR PLATFORMS.  

The only thing that spews from that shithole turd 'president' is hate speech.  

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
3.1.2  Sean Treacy  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.1    7 months ago
RIGHT TO BLOCK HATE SPEECH ON THEIR PLATFORMS. 

You don't seem to understand what's going on.

Liberals are arguing that private companies' social media markets are public forums and should be governed by the First Amendment (at least when it's convenient for them politically).  "Hate speech" is not an exception to the First Amendment.  

 
 
 
katrix
3.1.3  katrix  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1    7 months ago
How was President Trump's use of Twitter's the block feature a First Amendment case

It's because he is President.  Surely you're aware of the facts in this instance.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
3.1.4  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1.2    7 months ago
"Hate speech" is not an exception to the First Amendment.  

So when I send Breitbart several of my opinion pieces about how fucking stupid YEC's and other conservative Republicans are and how the Christian religion is nothing but a scam screwing people out of their money, they should be forced to publish my thoughts, right? I mean, freedom of speech, right? Just like Google and Facebook, they should be forced to host my opposing views, right?

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
3.1.5  Thrawn 31  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1    7 months ago

I have been consistent the entire time, social media companies have the right to block content or ban users based on their terms of service. And they also have the right to determine what the ToS is. They are not in any way shape or form beholden to the U.S. Constitution, end of story. 

 
 
 
Heartland American
3.1.6  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1.2    7 months ago

It is a typical liberal double standard.  

 
 
 
Heartland American
3.1.7  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3.1.5    7 months ago

That may be subject to change...

 
 
 
epistte
3.1.8  epistte  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1.2    7 months ago
You don't seem to understand what's going on. Liberals are arguing that private companies' social media markets are public forums and should be governed by the First Amendment (at least when it's convenient for them politically).  "Hate speech" is not an exception to the First Amendment.  

The First Amendment's free speech guarantees don't apply to private property such as Google. You are not a paying customer, but instead, are a guest on that site, so you have even fewer rights. 

The bakers could put a sign in his window or on the packaging but he could not deny equal service to people who his religion doesn't approve on. In-and-Out wrappers/cups have bible verses on it and it has never been removed.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/in-n-out/

 
 
 
Sunshine
3.1.9  Sunshine  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3.1.5    7 months ago
I have been consistent the entire time, social media companies have the right to block content or ban users based on their terms of service. And they also have the right to determine what the ToS is. They are not in any way shape or form beholden to the U.S. Constitution, end of story. 

Yes, a private entity should be able to refuse/ban their services/products from people who do not meet their standards. jrSmiley_80_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
epistte
3.1.10  epistte  replied to  Sunshine @3.1.9    7 months ago
Yes, a private entity should be able to refuse/ban their services/products from people who do not meet their standards.

The US Supreme Court said that a public business cannot deny equal service because of their religious beliefs. Newman v.Piggie Park.

The lower courts didn’t think much of his argument. And neither did the Supreme Court, which resoundingly rejected Bessinger’s plea to allow his religious beliefs to serve as a shield for his obligations under the newly enacted civil-rights statute—an obligation that included serving Mungin and other black customers. In a footnote joined by all the justices, the high court made plain that “this is not even a borderline case” of discrimination, and shot down Bessinger’s defense that the federal public-accommodations law was unconstitutional “because it contravenes the will of God and constitutes an interference with the free exercise of the Defendant’s religion.”
 
 
 
MrFrost
3.1.11  MrFrost  replied to  Sean Treacy @3.1    6 months ago
Really? How was President Trump's use of Twitter's the block feature a First Amendment case? Amazing how the same people so upset by that now rush to defend a corporation's right to control speech. 

Because he was issuing policy decisions/changes via twitter. The courts determined that ALL citizens should have access to his Twitter feed for that reason. 

Personally I couldn't care less, he blocked me on Twitter over a year ago...I guess I offended trumpy's ego. Poor thing. Such a tender little snowflake. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
4  Thrawn 31    7 months ago

Back to bitching about private entities being private entities? 

 
 
 
luther28
5  luther28    7 months ago

The Rise of Artificial Freedom

Oh kind of like a woman's control over her own body, that many seem to want to females of late.

If you want to defend freedom, then be noble, defend a woman's.

 
 
 
Heartland American
5.1  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  luther28 @5    7 months ago

Please stay on the topic of the seed which is social media and news discussion sites on line trampling upon the first amendment rights of members and calling that trampling community standards.  

 
 
 
luther28
5.1.1  luther28  replied to  Heartland American @5.1    7 months ago

I'm sorry, I was under the impression that freedom was not a singular application to one subject.

Wrong Country, I apologize.

 
 
 
Heartland American
5.1.2  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  luther28 @5.1.1    7 months ago

Well conservatives have to abide by the topic of the seeded article on liberals seeds but the reverse is clearly not the case.  You all can spew whatever off topic bs you want on ours and it’s a ok. And yes your post was off topic crap 💩 to the subject matter of this seed.  

 
 
 
Heartland American
5.2  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  luther28 @5    7 months ago

Way to go off topic and be allowed to do so over the seeders objections.  

 
 
 
luther28
5.2.1  luther28  replied to  Heartland American @5.2    7 months ago
The Rise of Artificial Freedom

Freedom was your topic.

You must of forgotten.

 
 
 
Heartland American
5.2.2  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  luther28 @5.2.1    6 months ago

A baby and it’s right to life is not artificial.  Intelligence on line particularly in big social media is not only artificial but an oxymoron.  I’ve enjoyed the recent slide in the value of Alphabet due to government and court attention to their hate of and bigotry toward Christianity and conservatism.  

 
 
 
Gordy327
5.2.3  Gordy327  replied to  Heartland American @5.2.2    6 months ago
A baby and it’s right to life is not artificial.

That's also not the topic of discussion. Way to go off topic in your own article.

I’ve enjoyed the recent slide in the value of Alphabet due to government and court attention to their hate of and bigotry toward Christianity and conservatism.

More faux persecution nonsense!

 
 
 
Heartland American
5.2.4  seeder  Heartland American  replied to  Gordy327 @5.2.3    6 months ago

Might as well since you all can.  As to the other, Alphabet, Twitter, Facebook, etc. they will be made to pay for their bigoted hate crimes against a large portion of the population of our country. 

 
 
 
Gordy327
5.2.5  Gordy327  replied to  Heartland American @5.2.4    6 months ago
Might as well since you all can.

Can what exactly?

 As to the other, Alphabet, Twitter, Facebook, etc. they will be made to pay for their bigoted hate crimes against a large portion of the population of our country. 

jrSmiley_90_smiley_image.gif

 
 
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