Limbaugh: Radio And Political Genius

  

Category:  Op/Ed

Via:  donald-j-trump-fan-1  •  7 months ago  •  64 comments

By:   Victor Davis Hansen

Limbaugh: Radio And Political Genius
Rush Limbaugh certainly is the genius of talk radio, a genre in which he not merely excelled but that he also singlehandedly reinvented as something entirely different — and entirely more powerful and instrumental in American life — from what was imaginable pre-Limbaugh. Even stranger still, his ascendance coincided with the presumed nadir of radio itself. It was supposedly a has-been, one-dimensional medium, long overshadowed by television. Even in the late 1980s, radio was about to be...

Rush Limbaugh is a great American.  A complete patriot.  An American hero. He transformed our media, saved AM radio, and gave us ordinary bitter clingers and deplorables a voice in our politics.  He made Palin, the Tea Party, and Trump possible.  He is a great Reagan American, positive, optimistic, hopeful, yet able to deal with the narcissist opposition to American conservatism.  He’s a great American who has donated so much to charities around the nation and gave voice to the silent majority. Trump was right to award 🥇 him the Presidential medal of Freedom.  God bless you Rush from a listener dating back to KNBR in Sacramento, Ca, and May you win the health battle before you now. 


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


“I’m one of the luckiest people to be alive”


state-of-the-union-rush-limbaugh.jpg Rush Limbaugh receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom

His ‘army of one,’ inspiring millions who’d been ignored, changed the political landscape.


Genius is often defined in myriad ways. One trusted criterion is the ability to do something extraordinary in a field where others could not — and doing something that perhaps will never be done again by anyone else.

By that measure, Rush Limbaugh certainly is the genius of talk radio, a genre in which he not merely excelled but that he also singlehandedly reinvented as something entirely different — and entirely more powerful and instrumental in American life — from what was imaginable pre-Limbaugh.

Even stranger still, his ascendance coincided with the presumed nadir of radio itself. It was supposedly a has-been, one-dimensional medium, long overshadowed by television. Even in the late 1980s, radio was about to be sentenced as obsolete in the ascendant cyber age of what would become Internet blogs, podcasts, streaming, and smartphone television.

Stranger still, Limbaugh has prospered through two generations and picked up millions of listeners who were not born when he first went national and who had no idea of why or how he had become a national presence.

He certainly did not capture new listeners by adjusting to the times. While tastes changed and the issues often metamorphosed, he did not. He remained conservative, commonsensical, and skeptical of Washington and those in it, as if he knew all the predictable thousand faces of the timeless progressive project, whose various manifestations reappear to mask a single ancient and predictable essence: the desire of a self-appointed group of elites to expand government in order to regiment the lives of ordinary people, allegedly to achieve greater mandated equality and social justice but more often to satisfy their own narcissistic will to power. It was Limbaugh who most prominently warned that lax immigration enforcement would soon lead to open calls for open borders, that worry about “global warming” would transform into calls to ban the internal combustion engine, and that the logical end of federal takeover of health care would be Medicare for All.

rushlimbaugh-fb.jpg

The Left — and many too who would later become the Never Trump Right — thought that Limbaugh’s worst moment finally came after Obama’s 2008 victory, during the post-election euphoria and just days before the January 2009 inauguration. It was a heady time, when the media would go on to declare soon-to-be Nobel laureate President Obama as, variously, a living “god” and “the smartest guy” ever to assume the presidency. His supporters often compared him to iconic wartime presidents such as FDR and Lincoln. Americans had been lectured on Obama’s divinity even as a candidate, and the evidence had ranged from the mundane of Platonically perfect creases in his trousers, to the telepathic ability to prompt spontaneous electrical impulses in the legs of cable television anchors.

In answer to Obama’s promise to fundamentally “transform America,” Limbaugh flat-out said he hoped that the new president would not succeed: “I hope Obama fails.” Outrage followed. Was Limbaugh rooting for the failure of America itself? In fact, he was worrying about how America might survive the first unabashedly progressive president in over 60 years, now empowered by an obsequious media, a House majority, a veto-proof Senate, and Supreme Court picks on the near horizon.

Limbaugh was the first voice to warn that what would soon follow the election was not the agenda that Obama sometimes disingenuously voiced on the campaign trail — Obama’s ruse of occasionally sounding concerned about illegal immigration, gay marriage, the spiraling debt, a rapid pullout from Iraq, and identity politics — but rather a move to the progressive hard-left.

What would ensue instead lined up with Obama’s senatorial voting record, his prior associations with the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, Bill Ayers, and Father Pfleger, and his occasional slips on the campaign trail: “I want you to argue with them and get in their face,” “If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a knife,” and (in the pre-Netflix, pre–Martha Vineyard estate days), “I think when you spread the wealth around, it’s good for everybody.” Once elected, Obama was unbound. He lectured the nation about the wages of the West’s sin: the Crusades, America’s prior role in the world, and its own domestic woes. He instructed Americans on when it was the time to profit and when it was not, the point at which people should concede they had made enough money. And he listed the various reasons that he could not, as some anti-constitutional “king,” grant unconstitutional amnesties by fiat — before he went on to do just that.

Prior to Limbaugh’s national prominence, radio talk-show hosts were not shapers of national culture or politics. Even the few local and regional celebrity radio hosts had little power to influence issues of the day. While local talk radio was more conservative than liberal, it was hardly seen as traditional conservatives’ answer to the liberal biases of the major national newspapers, network evening news, and public radio and TV, much less the aristocratic pretensions of the Republican Beltway hierarchy.

So, what was inconceivable in 1988 was not just that any one person could leap from local prominence to national dominance, but that he could empower (rather than replace) his legions of radio subordinates. Far from making them irrelevant, Limbaugh energized talk-radio hosts. Once he became a national force, hundreds of others became far more effective conservative local and regional voices, partly through the art of emulation, partly through scheduling to lead in to or follow Limbaugh’s daily three-hour show, partly in the general renewed public interest in talk radio itself.

Call that coattails, or force multiplication, but in essence, Limbaugh redefined the genre as something more entertaining, more political, and yet more serious — an “army of one” antidote to the New York and Washington media corridor. How strange that after progressives achieved a monopoly in network news, public television and radio, the Internet conglomerates, Hollywood, and network prime-time programing, they sought to emulate Limbaugh by creating their own leftist version of national talk radio, Air America. Millions of dollars, dozens of talk-radio hosts, and Chapter 11 later, the venture collapsed in abject failure.

I wager that more Democrats listened to Limbaugh than to Air America, in the fashion of my late Democratic father, who used to sneak into my office on the farm and listen with me to Rush during the 1991 Gulf War.

How did Limbaugh do it?

No one really knows because few have been able to duplicate his success, despite a number of gifted hosts who have tried. For all the criticism that Limbaugh was crass, over some 25,000 hours of the syndicated Limbaugh show, there were few embarrassments. And in cases where Limbaugh said something he regretted, he later apologized. He certainly could grow animated but seldom shouted and yelled. He talked about having talent “on loan from God” but could turn self-deprecatory and compliment callers for insights that he found original and noteworthy, saying, “I hadn’t thought of that.” He mocked identity politics but at work and in life often surrounded himself with talented people who were not white, and he seemed oblivious to any significance of that fact other than that he’d found friends and employees who were competent and whom he liked. He was a self-made multimillionaire many times over and proud of it, and yet felt and acted more comfortable with those of the Midwestern middle classes with whom he’d grown up.

Perhaps the best clue is that Limbaugh was never just a talk-show host at all. Or rather, he redefined the talk-radio three-hour format into something far more expansive than the critical arts of editorializing and answering impromptu listeners’ calls. In his prime role as unyielding conservative explicator of the daily news without the filters of the Washington and New York commentariat, he combined the jobs of entertainer, stand-up comedian, psychologist, impressionist, satirist, provocateur, therapist, and listener to the nation.

Yet ultimately his audience listened because he differentiated between two worlds. On one hand, he saw, with a skeptic’s eye, the cosmos of progressive and liberal translators who selectively edit the day’s events and massage their supposed importance to Americans, to present the news in line with liberals’ preconceived agendas — under the guise that such reporting was beyond reproach as professional, disinterested, and entirely based in facts. Limbaugh exploded all those pretenses.

But he also saw the other world that was never reported. He did not claim to be a traditional journalist or even an opinion journalist. Instead, he proudly assumed the mantle and collective voice of a conservative Everyman. Or maybe, more dramatically, his listeners saw him as an atoll of traditional sanity in a turbulent sea of postmodern madness. His forte was explaining why nominal conservatives were infected with a fatal virus of wanting to be liked by the “mainstream media” and the cultural elite — and thus often “grew” in office, moving leftward, as if they had become smarter and more sophisticated than those who had voted for them.

People tuned in because they knew in advance that Rush would not weaken or deviate, much less “transcend” them. There would be no faddish Limbaugh who renounced his prior personas and positions. So his listeners were reassured each day that they were not themselves crazy to express doubt about what the nation was told or instructed.

rush-limbaugh-turning-point.jpg?fit=789% Rush Limbaugh speaks at the 2019 Student Action Summit in West Palm Beach, Fla., December 21, 2019. (Gage Skidmore)

The  New York Times  story picked up by their local paper, the NPR segment they heard in the car, and the commentary of the ABC, CBS, or NBC evening news anchors were rarely if at all the whole truth and anything but the truth. Limbaugh reminded them that what was purportedly the news was increasingly the output of a rather narrow slice of cocooned America between Washington, D.C., and New York City, offered up by affluent progressives (the “drive-bys”) who had come to believe that the media’s role was not to report events per se, but to do so in a way that would not only educate the otherwise blinkered American masses but would also improve them morally and make them redeemable spiritually.

Limbaugh did all that, day in and day out, without any sense of monotony or boredom, but with almost adolescent energy and excitement about just talking to America each day. He never dialed it in. And his audience knew it.

Limbaugh himself knew his listeners, not just by class or locale, but through a shared skepticism about the values of coastal America and its inability to show any correlation between proven excellence and an array of letters after one’s name or name-dropping on a résumé. Does anyone think that a professor of journalism, a Washington pundit, a network anchor, a Senate elder, a president, or even a late-night TV host could host 30 hours of the Limbaugh show without losing most of the audience?

He was the Midwestern college drop-out who had bounced around among jobs before he found his natural place. Through that experience, he posed an ancient Euripidean question, “What is wisdom?” The answer was found in many of his targets: academics, editorialists, celebrities, journalists, government functionaries, and politicos whose bromides Limbaugh made ridiculous, and he instructed millions on how and why their ideas made no sense in a real world beyond their enclaves. Rush was hated by the Left supposedly for his politically incorrect -isms and -ologies; in truth, it was because he so often made them look ridiculous.

Limbaugh sounded sane when giddy Stanford grad and Rhodes scholar Rachel Maddow enthused about Robert Mueller’s daily walls-are-closing-in bombshells — much as farmer and Cal Poly graduate Devin Nunes wrote the truth in his House Intelligence Committee majority report while Harvard Law graduate Adam Schiff’s nose grew in his minority-report reply, and in the way that supposedly idiotic wheeler-dealer Donald Trump energized the economy after Ivy League sophisticate Barack Obama said it would require a magic wand.

In response to Rush Limbaugh’s announcement that he has advanced lung cancer, millions voiced sympathy, support — and shock. Last week, millions asked, “What are Rush’s chances?” The correct answer might be, “Not good —  if it was anyone but Rush .”

Yet one who can create national talk radio ex nihilo can similarly beat toxic malignancy. His listeners seemed worried not just over Rush’s health but about their own equally ominous future of the day’s events without him.

May that day be far off.

By  Victor Davis Hanson , NRO contributor  Victor Davis Hanson  is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author, most recently, of  The Case for Trump @vdhanson


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MAGA
1  seeder  MAGA    7 months ago

How did Limbaugh do it?

No one really knows because few have been able to duplicate his success, despite a number of gifted hosts who have tried. For all the criticism that Limbaugh was crass, over some 25,000 hours of the syndicated Limbaugh show, there were few embarrassments. And in cases where Limbaugh said something he regretted, he later apologized. He certainly could grow animated but seldom shouted and yelled. He talked about having talent “on loan from God” but could turn self-deprecatory and compliment callers for insights that he found original and noteworthy, saying, “I hadn’t thought of that.” He mocked identity politics but at work and in life often surrounded himself with talented people who were not white, and he seemed oblivious to any significance of that fact other than that he’d found friends and employees who were competent and whom he liked. He was a self-made multimillionaire many times over and proud of it, and yet felt and acted more comfortable with those of the Midwestern middle classes with whom he’d grown up.

Perhaps the best clue is that Limbaugh was never just a talk-show host at all. Or rather, he redefined the talk-radio three-hour format into something far more expansive than the critical arts of editorializing and answering impromptu listeners’ calls. In his prime role as unyielding conservative explicator of the daily news without the filters of the Washington and New York commentariat, he combined the jobs of entertainer, stand-up comedian, psychologist, impressionist, satirist, provocateur, therapist, and listener to the nation.

Yet ultimately his audience listened because he differentiated between two worlds. On one hand, he saw, with a skeptic’s eye, the cosmos of progressive and liberal translators who selectively edit the day’s events and massage their supposed importance to Americans, to present the news in line with liberals’ preconceived agendas — under the guise that such reporting was beyond reproach as professional, disinterested, and entirely based in facts. Limbaugh exploded all those pretenses.

But he also saw the other world that was never reported. He did not claim to be a traditional journalist or even an opinion journalist. Instead, he proudly assumed the mantle and collective voice of a conservative Everyman. Or maybe, more dramatically, his listeners saw him as an atoll of traditional sanity in a turbulent sea of postmodern madness. His forte was explaining why nominal conservatives were infected with a fatal virus of wanting to be liked by the “mainstream media” and the cultural elite — and thus often “grew” in office, moving leftward, as if they had become smarter and more sophisticated than those who had voted for them.

People tuned in because they knew in advance that Rush would not weaken or deviate, much less “transcend” them. There would be no faddish Limbaugh who renounced his prior personas and positions. So his listeners were reassured each day that they were not themselves crazy to express doubt about what the nation was told or instructed.

https://thenewstalkers.com/community/discussion/49507/limbaugh-radio-and-political-genius

 
 
 
devangelical
1.1  devangelical  replied to  MAGA @1    7 months ago

AM wingnut talk radio is popular to those living when radio was the only home entertainment.

 
 
 
bugsy
1.1.1  bugsy  replied to  devangelical @1.1    7 months ago
AM wingnut talk radio is popular to those living when radio was the only home entertainment.

Probably why I listen to him on FM.

 
 
 
MAGA
1.1.2  seeder  MAGA  replied to  bugsy @1.1.1    7 months ago

I do now as well.  Both of our AM news talk stations and sports stations now have FM formats

 
 
 
devangelical
1.1.4  devangelical  replied to    7 months ago

raygun abolished truth in broadcasting for wingnuts back in the 80's

 
 
 
MrFrost
1.2  MrFrost  replied to  MAGA @1    7 months ago
How did Limbaugh do it?

By having a lot of really gullible listeners. 

 
 
 
cjcold
1.2.2  cjcold  replied to    7 months ago

Actually many studies have proved that Fox viewers are even less informed on issues of the day than people who watch no news at all.

 
 
 
MAGA
1.2.3  seeder  MAGA  replied to  cjcold @1.2.2    7 months ago

Talk about fake news!  

 
 
 
MUVA
1.2.4  MUVA  replied to  cjcold @1.2.2    7 months ago

You should post the study.

 
 
 
MonsterMash
1.2.5  MonsterMash  replied to  cjcold @1.2.2    7 months ago
Actually many studies have proved that 1.3% of liberals have hemmorrhoids the other 98.7% are perfect ass holes.

 
 
 
devangelical
1.3  devangelical  replied to  MAGA @1    7 months ago

“I’m one of the luckiest people to be alive”

bwah ha ha. not for long ass-wipe. you got your BS trinket from trumpski, now go dig a big hole.

 
 
 
MAGA
1.3.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  devangelical @1.3    7 months ago

death wishing is not allowed here even for public figures. 

 
 
 
devangelical
1.3.2  devangelical  replied to  MAGA @1.3.1    7 months ago

the only thing missing from this obit/seed is the dates. fuck that racist POS trumpster.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.4  Vic Eldred  replied to  MAGA @1    7 months ago

I have never had the chance to listen to one of Limbaugh's shows. I remember back when talk radio was dominated by old fashioned liberals. As a matter of fact one of them helped get me interested in politics. That man was Jerry Williams. When I heard him, I couldn't believe anyone could reach such conclusions or treat the callers to the show the way he did. There is no doubt about it, they have a huge influence on public perception be it positive or negative. Something tells me that Limbaugh was the greatest of them all.

 
 
 
MrFrost
2  MrFrost    7 months ago

Limbaugh spent decades railing against drug users, then it's discovered that he is a drug user... Now he is railing against a gays....

I'll just leave that there. 

Limbaugh is a lying conspiracy theorist and a worthless human being. 

512

 
 
 
devangelical
2.1  devangelical  replied to  MrFrost @2    7 months ago
I'll just leave that there. 

after all his visits to the dominican republic, he's probably lying about the terminal disease he's contracted too. somebody that toxic needs to be encased in concrete and buried in a hazmat dump when their time comes.

 
 
 
Tessylo
2.1.1  Tessylo  replied to  devangelical @2.1    7 months ago

Yeah all those visits to the Dominican Republic with other men with Viagara to be with little boys.  

 
 
 
JohnRussell
3  JohnRussell    7 months ago

If there is a hell, Rush Limbaugh will be there. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  JohnRussell @3    7 months ago

I have to agree with you there, John.

 
 
 
MAGA
3.1.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    7 months ago

I thought hat implying people should end up burning in hell was not an ok sentiment to b e expressed here.  Maybe now I can say what John did about certain progressive entertainers and politicians...

 
 
 
devangelical
3.1.2  devangelical  replied to  MAGA @3.1.1    7 months ago
I thought that implying people should end up burning in hell was not an okay sentiment to be expressed here (typos in quote corrected)

... which is what half of the publishers seeds devolve into. pure comedy.

 
 
 
lady in black
4  lady in black    7 months ago

Rush is a vile human being

 
 
 
MAGA
4.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  lady in black @4    7 months ago

Rush Limbaugh is a great American! A true hero [deleted]

 
 
 
lady in black
4.1.1  lady in black  replied to  MAGA @4.1    7 months ago

Rush is a vile lush, drug addict and pedo....he's no hero, he's a zero.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1.3  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  MAGA @4.1    7 months ago

Who knew you had a sense of humor.

 
 
 
MAGA
4.1.4  seeder  MAGA  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.3    7 months ago

I’m serious and all I said is true.  

 
 
 
MAGA
4.1.5  seeder  MAGA  replied to  lady in black @4.1.1    7 months ago

Rush is an award winning great American.  He is America’s voice of truth.

 
 
 
lady in black
4.1.6  lady in black  replied to  MAGA @4.1.5    7 months ago

He's a vile human being.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1.7  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  MAGA @4.1.4    7 months ago

That is the humorous part.

 
 
 
cjcold
4.1.8  cjcold  replied to  MAGA @4.1.5    7 months ago

Rush's only award comes from the liar in chief. Reality doesn't get much more insane than that Rush is awarded the medal of freedom. Only a hate monger president would award a hate monger the medal of freedom.

 
 
 
MAGA
4.1.9  seeder  MAGA  replied to  cjcold @4.1.8    7 months ago

The hate that exists is that which is directed at Rush by his ideological opposition.  

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
5  sandy-2021492    7 months ago

ttps://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/07/sunday-review/rush-limbaugh-trump-medal.html

On whether the massacre of Native Americans is comparable to the World War II Holocaust:

Image 09Limbaugh-08-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7

On feminism:

09Limbaugh-07-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
Image
09Limbaugh-07-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7

On Hu Jintao, the former president of China, speaking without a translator:

09Limbaugh-02-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
Image
09Limbaugh-02-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7

On Sandra Fluke, who as a Georgetown University law student in 2012 testified in support of the Obama administration’s birth control policies:

09Limbaugh-05-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
Image
09Limbaugh-05-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7

On the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People:

09Limbaugh-06-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
Image
09Limbaugh-06-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7

On athletes in the National Football League:

09Limbaugh-04-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
Image
09Limbaugh-04-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7

On sexual consent:

09Limbaugh-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&a
Image
09Limbaugh-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&a

On the idea of white guilt:

09Limbaugh-03-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
Image
09Limbaugh-03-articleLarge.jpg?quality=7
 
 
 
MAGA
 
 
sandy-2021492
5.1.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  MAGA @5.1    7 months ago

You're not bothered by Rush's blatant misogyny and racism? 

 
 
 
MAGA
5.1.2  seeder  MAGA  replied to  sandy-2021492 @5.1.1    7 months ago

He is neither a racist nor a misogynist  so no I’m not bothered by what’s not there.  I do understand the bitterness of the bi coastal secular progressive left elites because he gave voice to us bitter clingers and deplorables in the flyover rural Heartland of America from which he came.  

 
 
 
cjcold
5.1.3  cjcold  replied to  MAGA @5.1.2    7 months ago

Born, raised and live in the most central of flyover states and am proud to be a liberal centrist. There are lots of us.

 
 
 
MUVA
5.1.4  MUVA  replied to  cjcold @5.1.3    7 months ago

There is no such thing as a liberal centrist try again.

 
 
 
MAGA
5.1.5  seeder  MAGA  replied to  MUVA @5.1.4    7 months ago

Exactly.  He’s really a liberal progressive claiming the center like some “independents” try to do.  

 
 
 
cjcold
5.1.6  cjcold  replied to  MAGA @5.1.5    7 months ago

Actually my politics have been pretty much the same for my whole life and have voted for both democrats and republicans. Voted for GHW Bush. 

Have never been a member of a political party although was a NRA member and have owned firearms since I was a teen. 

Not until Fox, Rush and the tea party came along did I realize that the far right was becoming evil incarnate. Trump has only solidified that opinion.

Still consider myself an independent centrist even though far right wing fanaticism has redrawn the lines somewhat.

 
 
 
MAGA
6  seeder  MAGA    7 months ago

all the hate and bitterness and rage of the left comes oozing out in response to a good article about a great American.  we love you Rush!  You gave us mainstream middfle class Heartland Americans a voice in our politics and we are grateful. Let the left wallow in their misery and hate. 

 
 
 
devangelical
6.1  devangelical  replied to  MAGA @6    7 months ago
a good article about a great American

where? link? certainly not racist rush.

 
 
 
MAGA
6.1.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  devangelical @6.1    7 months ago

Rush is a very great American.  He is a good man and a Presidential Medal of Freedom award winner. 

 
 
 
cjcold
6.1.2  cjcold  replied to  MAGA @6.1.1    7 months ago

Both Limbaugh and trump are what is wrong with America. 

Far right wing fascism is what starts wars.

 
 
 
Kavika
6.2  Kavika   replied to  MAGA @6    7 months ago

Rush Limbaugh the personification of [hate.removed]

 
 
 
MAGA
6.2.2  seeder  MAGA  replied to    7 months ago

I am uniquely blessed to be Rush Limbaugh's  brother  in ways too numerous to count, and I am blessed to be in the special position of witnessing firsthand the outpouring of love and prayers from his family, friends and fans. His wife, Kathryn, has been amazing and a rock throughout.

I could fill a book with the well-wishes I've received. I sent Rush a link to my "mentions" column on  Twitter  so he could scroll through it and see for himself what he means to so many people.

These tender expressions of goodwill are uplifting and spiritually affirming.  God is at work , and however this plays out, God is good, something Rush has been saying repeatedly in the last few weeks, despite his difficult circumstances.

Many of the messages he has received have brought him to tears, which is not typical for him. These are sobering times.

Continue Reading Below

Their antipathy is disturbing. They actually wish him physical, emotional and spiritual harm. "I'm rooting for the cancer." "I won't be happy until he's until he's screaming in agony 24/7." Lovely.

As passionate as I am about my own political beliefs, I never wish harm on those who disagree. If anyone needs prayers, it is them -- and I mean that sincerely.

Rush has inspired so many people like this one: "But the main thing I wanted to tell you is that you really did make me who I am now. ... You MADE me. Because of you, I was able to completely change careers. ... I love what I'm doing now -- and, I hope I'm making a difference. I owe all of this -- every bit of it -- to you. So thank you -- for that, and for all you taught me over 36 years and counting."

I have to say that while I've always known Rush is strong, I've never seen anything like how he has handled his diagnosis. He has honestly shown no concern for himself. His overriding concern is for his audience, his family and his friends. He is determined not to let any of us down. He seems more concerned about how this news will impact me than how it is affecting him. I am not exaggerating. He has shown more grace and class in this time than I would have thought possible. I couldn't be prouder of him -- and I'm even prouder that he is my brother.

No one knows what the outcome of this will be, but through it all, we must remain positive and optimistic. That matters. And we must draw closer to God.

You Rush fans and well-wishers can't begin to understand how much you mean to Rush and to us. Your prayers are more comforting and more important than we can describe. God bless Rush, and God bless every one of you.

 
 
 
Kavika
6.2.3  Kavika   replied to    7 months ago
I see a lot of hate right here.

Willful ignorance proves to be contagious. [removed]

 
 
 
MAGA
6.2.4  seeder  MAGA  replied to    7 months ago

So do I. 

 
 
 
cjcold
6.2.5  cjcold  replied to    7 months ago
I see a lot of hate right here.

Far right wing hate filled fascism tends to bring the hate out in me. 

I just hang out here at times to deal with Heartland Institute shills.

I do hate Heartland Institute shills.

 
 
 
MAGA
6.3  seeder  MAGA  replied to  MAGA @6    7 months ago
 
 
 
Split Personality
 
 
MAGA
6.3.2  seeder  MAGA  replied to  Split Personality @6.3.1    7 months ago

You do realize the counter productiveness of linking what you did don’t you?  A negative report from  the bible of here or what you linked is a badge of honor to us.  It’s a positive thing to be on the wrong side of their reviews.  They are not to be listened to or obeyed but only as an obstacle to find a work around get view points they disapprove of out there anyway.  

 
 
 
Split Personality
6.3.3  Split Personality  replied to  MAGA @6.3.2    7 months ago

Oh, the irony....

 
 
 
MAGA
6.3.4  seeder  MAGA  replied to  Split Personality @6.3.3    7 months ago

The real irony is that the meme is so perfectly fitting and right on.  [deleted]  

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
7  Paula Bartholomew    7 months ago

Re: The feminism quote, the same could be said for him as a radio talk show host.  Radio talk shows were invented so that bloviating gas bags could talk and not make their audiences sick if they actually had to look at them.

 
 
 
MAGA
7.1  seeder  MAGA  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @7    7 months ago

We wish Rush good health and a victory over his stage IV lung cancer.  God Bless Rush!

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
7.1.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  MAGA @7.1    7 months ago

I have no use for the man, but I would not wish cancer on anyone, even him.

 
 
 
cjcold
7.1.2  cjcold  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @7.1.1    7 months ago

What with all of those cigars, alcohol, cocaine and opioid abuse, he destroyed his immune system and wished it on himself. Can't feel sorry for the nasty SOB.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
7.1.3  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  cjcold @7.1.2    7 months ago

I don't feel sorry for him, I just don't wish cancer on anyone.

 
 
 
Gordy327
8  Gordy327    7 months ago

Howard Stern is infinitely better than Rush, as is satellite radio better than terrestrial radio. Baba Booey! 

 
 
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