Asian giant hornet invasion becomes latest 2020 concern

  
Via:  perrie-halpern  •  3 weeks ago  •  124 comments

By:   Doha Madani (NBC News)

Asian giant hornet invasion becomes latest 2020 concern
An invasion of Asian giant hornets became the latest 2020 worry — and internet sensation — as the term "murder hornet" began to trend over the weekend.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


An invasion of Asian giant hornets became the latest 2020 worry — and internet sensation — as the term "murder hornet" began to trend over the weekend.

The first spotting of the 2-inch Asian giant hornet, or vespa mandarinia, was verified in the United States in December, according to the Washington state Agriculture Department. The insect does not generally target people or pets, but it is a deadly threat to at-risk honeybee hives.

Giant hornets of this species apparently enter a "slaughter phase" during which they decapitate honeybees and destroy entire hives in the span of a few hours, according to the department.

Asian giant hornet is the world's largest species of hornet.Washington State Department of Agriculture

Although the species was first spotted months ago, the term "murder hornet" circulated on Twitter over the weekend after a New York Times report Saturday on efforts to stop the species from annihilating honeybees.

As the globe reels with the upheaval of normal life during the coronavirus pandemic, the internet latched onto "murder hornets" as yet another strange development of 2020.

"Murder hornets. Sure thing, 2020," actor and comedian Patton Oswalt tweeted Saturday. "Give us everything. Hypno-frogs. Fecal blizzards. Toilet tsunamis. A CATS sequel. We can take it."


Murder hornets. Sure thing, 2020. Give us everything. Hypno-frogs. Fecal blizzards. Toilet tsunamis. A CATS sequel. We can take it. https://t.co/DSDpgKhKzQ — Patton Oswalt (@pattonoswalt) May 2, 2020


Guys, this Jumanji game is already going so badly. Someone please roll a 6. https://t.co/MT4Id5Zf6P — Benjamin Siemon (@BenjaminJS) May 2, 2020


Could whoever is in charge of the simulation stop letting your little brother press all the buttons https://t.co/Hqp3ZyYcr7 — Kat Dennings (@OfficialKat) May 3, 2020

An invasion could have severely negative impacts on the environment and public health, the Washington Agriculture Department warned.

The species has longer stingers with more toxic venom that could pose a danger to people if the insects feel threatened. And unlike honeybees, the Asian giant hornets can sting repeatedly, entomologist Chris Looney said in a video posted to the department's YouTube page last month.

Authorities are working to find nests and destroy them before they can reproduce, according to Looney.

Looney warned people against trying to kill the hornets themselves and to avoid their nests entirely. Instead, the public is encouraged to report a possible sighting to local authorities.

190612-doha-madani-byline-30644_b436aec3 Doha Madani

Doha Madani is a breaking news reporter for NBC News.


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Buzz of the Orient
1  Buzz of the Orient    3 weeks ago

What will the next plague be?  Darkness?

darknessplague-58dc22093df78c516273fca8.

I've suggested this before, and I'm suggesting it again...

Final-plague-Egypt-blood-doorpost-ftr.jp

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    3 weeks ago

I don't think my neighbors would appreciate me slaughtering their lambs....

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
1.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1    3 weeks ago

One should be enough, and think of all the great meals - lamb chops, leg of lamb, etc.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.1.1    3 weeks ago

I'll give those to Mr Giggles since I don't like lamb. Haven't been able to eat it since I raised a couple of lambs for a 4-H project and then sold them for butchering.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
1.1.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.2    3 weeks ago

Oh!  It's my favourite meat.  Of course I never raised a lamb so I don't get emotional about eating it, especially if I never knew it before it was butchered. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.4  Trout Giggles  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.1.3    3 weeks ago

We kept one of the lambs for ourselves. We had 3, one for me, one for my brother and one for the house.

After we slaughtered and butchered the 3rd one, my mom made lamb chops one night for dinner. Mom, me, and my brother couldn't eat them because we were the ones who took care of them and unfortunately got attached. Dad had no problem, tho

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.5  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.2    3 weeks ago

I can eat anything I have had as a pet, so I hear ya on that one. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.6  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.1.3    3 weeks ago

It's mine too, Buzz. But then I never raised one (nor do I want to, cause then I won't be able to eat it.)

You know that is how Paul and Linda McCartney became vegetarians. They were eating store bought lamb, when a pet lamb came to the window on their farm. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.7  Trout Giggles  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.6    3 weeks ago

That wouldn't have turned me into a vegetarian, but I would have probably stopped eating lamb.

I also raised pigs as 4-H projects. I never got attached to them...probably because I like bacon and ham too much.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
1.1.8  Raven Wing  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.2    3 weeks ago
I'll give those to Mr Giggles since I don't like lamb

I don't like the taste of lamb, no matter how it is prepared. Goat I can eat and enjoy, especially, Cabrito, roasted goat Mexican style. The best I have ever eaten was in Reynosa and Matamoros Mexico. I tried it in Tijuana and it was nowhere near a good as Reynosa and Matamoros.

I just don't like the flavor of lamb. Just a bit too bland for my taste.

 
 
 
Freefaller
1.1.9  Freefaller  replied to  Raven Wing @1.1.8    3 weeks ago
Goat I can eat and enjoy,

Can't say I've had it a lot but the 3 or 4 times I have(Afghanistan) I found it to be somewhat dry, not bad but a little dry.  Might have been a regional preparation thing.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
1.1.10  Raven Wing  replied to  Freefaller @1.1.9    3 weeks ago

What I had in Reynosa and Matasmoros was flayed and stretched out on a spit and then roasted over charcoal. The meat was well marinated, then oiled and rubbed with spices, then well roasted. The meat was not dry at all, but, that could be due to the marinating and oiling.

I think that I had in Tijuana was just rubbed with spices and roasted, as it was a bit dry. The marinating and oiling really made the spices blend together well compared to just rubbing them on the dry meat before roasting. 

It could be the difference was in regard to the differences in regional tastes and cooking preferences. Same as people cooking BBQ in different areas of the country. KC BBQ compared to East Texas and California style cooking.

My Father was a great cook, and he wanted to fix some Cabrito himself. He used a well seasoned and delicious vinegar based BBQ sauce he was gifted by the owner of a little hole in the wall BBQ cafe that my Father frequented on his police beat. Man....it was really different from the Cabrito in Reynosa and Matamoros, but, was also really delicious. jrSmiley_102_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.11  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.5    3 weeks ago

Thanks to 20 years of military service that included survival training in multiple climates and terrain, I can honestly say I've eaten things that most folks cannot imagine or want to tolerate. It is amazing what one is willing to eat when faced with starvation.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.12  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.1.11    3 weeks ago

Did you ever eat a rabbit's eyeball? A dude I dated in Alaska went out on winter survival training and when he got back he told me all about it.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.13  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.12    3 weeks ago

Never a rabbit's eyeball, but I did try a goat one.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.14  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.1.13    3 weeks ago

Did it fly across your mouth? Was it hard to bite  down on?

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.15  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.14    3 weeks ago

Nah. Once boiled it was more like a chewy grape.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.16  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.1.15    3 weeks ago

yum

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1.17  Tessylo  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.16    3 weeks ago

Ever had lamb fries?

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.18  Trout Giggles  replied to  Tessylo @1.1.17    3 weeks ago

No because I'm pretty sure they're testicles. ewwww......

LOL!

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1.19  Tessylo  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.18    3 weeks ago

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.20  Trout Giggles  replied to  Tessylo @1.1.19    3 weeks ago

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

How many plates of those things did he wind up eating before he realized what they were?

I love that movie

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1.21  Tessylo  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.20    3 weeks ago

They looked delicious!

I loved that movie too.

I loved the scenes when he got a dog(s).  

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
1.1.22  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.5    3 weeks ago

I hear Guinea Pig is a favorite down in South America......

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
1.1.23  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.1.11    3 weeks ago

Yep to all.... Warner Springs.... April, 1982.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
1.1.24  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.5    3 weeks ago

I think you meant to say can't.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.25  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.18    3 weeks ago

Gotta love them rocky mountain oysters!

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.26  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @1.1.23    3 weeks ago

I did SERE training at Pickle Meadows, CA in 1975. Also did Jungle Survival Training at Cubi Point in the Philippines in 1985. Man them little Negrito tribesmen they had as instructors there were some very tough hombres pound for pound.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.27  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @1.1.22    3 weeks ago

You thinking of them giant rodents called Capybaras? They are related to guinea pigs and are hunted for their meat and pelts throughout much of South America. Them critters weigh over 100 lbs!

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    3 weeks ago

Good one, Buzz!

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
2  Vic Eldred    3 weeks ago

We might have to fight fire with fire. The Japanese Honey Bee has a way to cook the Asian Hornets! 

foxnews.com/science/japanese-honeybees-learned-how-to-cook-murder-hornet-report

So all we have to do now is replace our native Bee population with the Japanese species.


Wouldn't it have been so much easier to have supported Chiang Kai Shek way back when?

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Vic Eldred @2    3 weeks ago

America provided the Flying Tigers during WW2 (in fact they were based where I live - Chongqing).  The Flying Tigers also had Chinese pilots - I met one at the Flying Tigers Museum who used to fly cargo planes "over the hump" to Burma.  That's a poster of him and his family from back then.  The museum had been General Stilwell's home.

800

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
2.1.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1    3 weeks ago

Buzz, can you interpret this:

220px-Flying_Tigers_blood_chit_from_ROC_

 
 
 
The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"
2.1.2  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"  replied to  Vic Eldred @2.1.1    3 weeks ago

It's a menu with $6.99 lunch specials that include rice, egg roll and your choice of wonton or hot and sour soup.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
2.1.3  Vic Eldred  replied to  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen" @2.1.2    3 weeks ago

Lol, No, It's a thank you to the Americans who flew those planes:

"The Chinese characters read, "This foreign person has come to China to help in the war effort. Soldiers and civilians, one and all, should rescue and protect him." (R. E. Baldwin Collection)

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.4  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Vic Eldred @2.1.1    3 weeks ago

Noi, but I'm glad you did.  

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.5  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1    3 weeks ago

A note to Kavika:  I'm wearing my everyday, and favourite, jacket, that I still wear - the one that you've seen the "Street Help" symbol that is on the back.  The emblem on the front shows the bird, and the letters, "NaMeRes" which stands for Native Men's Residence, the place where I volunteered in Toronto, where my ex and I donated most of our furniture and furnishings that she did not need, or what we gave to our kids, when we sold our home and I moved to China. I came to China with only what I wore, could stuff in 2 suitcases, and some money.  

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
2.2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Vic Eldred @2    3 weeks ago

Vic,

The only problem is we don't know how aggressive those bees are. We already have an issue with a very aggressive bee from South America. 

This is my personal nightmare. I deadly allergic to insect bites. I walk around with an EpiPen. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
2.2.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.2    3 weeks ago
The only problem is we don't know how aggressive those bees are.

No, we don't. What we do know is that our native Bee's will be destroyed rather quickly by yet another invasive species. Do you really want to wait for another crisis?

 
 
 
Raven Wing
2.2.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.2    3 weeks ago

I am not allergic to bees, but, I sure would not want to be stung by one of those killer hornets. A regular hornet is bad enough, been stung by one of those several years ago and was sick for almost a week!

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
2.3  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Vic Eldred @2    3 weeks ago

Glad I live in a arid hot dry desert climate in SE Arizona where them critters won't tolerate. We have the aggressive Africanized Honey Bees here and they are bad enough at times.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
2.3.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @2.3    3 weeks ago

There is a lot to be said for the south west!

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
2.3.2  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Vic Eldred @2.3.1    3 weeks ago

Yep.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3  sandy-2021492    3 weeks ago

Their stingers are long enough to penetrate a beekeeper's suit.

And I think they're almost big enough to carry off my dog.

Murder hornets.  Haven't we had enough?

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
3.1  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3    3 weeks ago
And I think they're almost big enough to carry off my dog.

I'm going straight to hell for laughing at that, aren't I?   Did you read any of the Twitter feed that accompanied the article?  Also quite a hoot.  Feeling the flames already, I am.      

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1    3 weeks ago

I could definitely do without fecal tornadoes

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.1.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1    3 weeks ago
I'm going straight to hell for laughing at that, aren't I?

If you're going to hell, I'm going with you, because I meant it as a joke.  Mostly.

I didn't read the Twitter feed, but my Facebook friends are having a blast with this.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1.3  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.1.2    3 weeks ago
Did you read any of the Twitter feed that accompanied the article?  Also quite a hoot.  Feeling the flames already, I am.  I didn't read the Twitter feed, but my Facebook friends are having a blast with this.

Hey, I need to see that.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.1.4  sandy-2021492  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.3    3 weeks ago

I think I shared one.  I'll see about sharing some of the funnier ones.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.1.5  sandy-2021492  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.3    3 weeks ago

95995985_699663207526040_918494760156738

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.1.6  sandy-2021492  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.3    3 weeks ago

95715536_10222030927032016_7333538048103

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.1.7  sandy-2021492  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.3    3 weeks ago

95689444_10222030927312023_2198403324267

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.8  Trout Giggles  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.1.6    3 weeks ago

And it's only May 2020, mf

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1.9  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.1.7    3 weeks ago

LMAO!!

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1.10  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.8    3 weeks ago
And it's only May 2020, mf

Hey, just think of the fun to come.... next 

384

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.11  Trout Giggles  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.10    3 weeks ago

I actually like frogs and toads. They eat bugs. Ever see a toad catch a flying insect? It's cool but it happens fast

 
 
 
Raven Wing
3.1.12  Raven Wing  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.11    3 weeks ago
I actually like frogs and toads.

Same here. I have a couple of lizards that live by my patio. They eat the ants that wander up around the patio and help keep my area bug free. I named them Rupert and Tilly. They are mates, and they had some babies not long ago. Little baby lizards all around the place. One came inside under the door and Yoda found it. She played with it for a bit and then went to take a nap. I had to catch the little rascal and put it back outside for its anxious Mother pacing back and forth across the screen.

Now the babies are all grown up and also live here. They all know me and I talk to them when I see them. They don't run when I go in and out the door, they just go about their business of hunting for bugs. jrSmiley_13_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.13  Trout Giggles  replied to  Raven Wing @3.1.12    3 weeks ago

Aww....that's cute that they don't run from you.

We have what are called skinks but I call them lizards. They hide in the rocks in our flower beds and under the deck. They will run all over the sidewalk and decks when there are no cats around

 
 
 
Raven Wing
3.1.14  Raven Wing  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.13    2 weeks ago
We have what are called skinks but I call them lizards.

Not sure what Rupert and Tilly were, but, they looked like lizards. They didn't get all that big as adults, and their babies were really very tiny. I had to watch where I stepped after they started roaming around, I was afraid I would step on one of them and not know it. So I didn't take anything on the patio for granted and checked everything out to be sure what it was. I hated to leave them when I moved to No Virginia, but, I told the new residents about them and they said they would take are of them, as they were not bothered by them and liked the idea that they helped keep the insects down.

 
 
 
Freefaller
3.2  Freefaller  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3    3 weeks ago
Their stingers are long enough to penetrate a beekeeper's suit.

According to a  story I read yesterday they're actually long enough to penetrate a beekeeper suit over a pair of sweat pants over a pair of shorts.

I wonder how they made it over here?

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.2.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Freefaller @3.2    3 weeks ago
they're actually long enough to penetrate a beekeeper suit over a pair of sweat pants over a pair of shorts.

jrSmiley_97_smiley_image.gif

No idea how they got here.  Apparently, they nest underground.  At first, I thought maybe they'd been imported by accident in some lumber, but I don't see how that could be.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.2  XDm9mm  replied to  Freefaller @3.2    3 weeks ago
I wonder how they made it over here?

More than likely stowaways nesting in shipping containers.   You can find all sorts of creepy crawlers nesting in the structure.

 
 
 
Freefaller
3.2.3  Freefaller  replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.2    3 weeks ago

That's a reasonable assumption

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.4  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.2    3 weeks ago
More than likely stowaways nesting in shipping containers.

Possibly. Depending on the country of origin of the container and the contents some containers are required to be fumigated.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.5  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @3.2.4    3 weeks ago
Possibly. Depending on the country of origin of the container and the contents some containers are required to be fumigated.

And that would be predicated on the container contents and even if fumigated, if it would have any impact on a small nest of those critters.  

Of course, it could also have come in on a ship itself.  Hell, when I had to help clean out some agency property when it came back from the war zone about 10 years ago, I found some things that I NEVER saw before and don't want to again.  Those thingies survived the fumigation over there before shipping back, but they sure as hell didn't survive me and my boots!!

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.6  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.5    3 weeks ago

One of the products that required fumigation is wood products. Some types were fumigated held for 48 hours than fumigated again. 

Some required fumigation then unloaded for inspection to check for anything that survived.

We used to fumigate around 50 containers a week at one of our facilities.

Back in the day, we'd unload banana boats where the bananas were loaded in the hold of a vessel. Open up all the deck hatches put a conveyor belt from the deck to the hold, boot down, and start throwing stalk of bananas on the belt to take them topside. 

 We'd have to wear gloves that looked and acted like a welders glove all the way up to your elbow. They protected you from the banana spiders that would be hiding in the stalks of bananas. By the end of the shift, your arms felt like they were ten feet long. Stalks of bananas are damn heavy.

Ah, the good old days on the docks. That was almost as good as loading dry hides.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.7  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @3.2.6    3 weeks ago
 We'd have to wear gloves that looked and acted like a welders glove all the way up to your elbow. They protected you from the banana spiders that would be hiding in the stalks of bananas.

Wasn't there also some kind of seriously bad snake that hitched a ride with the bananas?   I seem to recall that from when I was a kid when Hunts Point was a major source for the NY metro area.

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.8  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.7    3 weeks ago

I saw a couple of snakes when unloading the bananas, they were not poisonous. I never saw any snake that was poisonous. Although I heard the story many times, I think that is was the old urban waterfront myth.  

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.9  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @3.2.8    3 weeks ago
Although I heard the story many times, I think that is was the old urban waterfront myth.

I have no idea.  The only memories I have of Hunts Point were great ones going there with my dad and uncles to get fresh produce.  Kind of like when I went with him to the Fulton Street fish market for right off the boat catches.

Yeah, there are some good memories of NY.   Of course, I'd never go back other than to visit family and even then it's for very short periods.   I've found it's easier to fly them here to TX than it is to go there and much less stressing!!

 
 
 
zuksam
3.2.10  zuksam  replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.5    3 weeks ago
And that would be predicated on the container contents and even if fumigated, if it would have any impact on a small nest of those critters.

The problem is even if it's contents get fumigated the insects are living in the structure of the container which is outside the weather tight cargo space so they aren't fumigated at all. They build their nests in that square tubing that makes up the base and frame of the shipping containers.

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.11  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.9    3 weeks ago

I loved working and living at the waterfront. Fresh fish in San Pedro coming right off the fishing boats. Great restaurants and made a damn good living as a longie.

The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach were the busiest ports in American and one of the busiest in the world. Actually the ports of LA and LB are one continuous port, it's a political divide, not a physical one. 

Some of the individual wharfs for an single container line were bigger than some ports in the US. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.12  XDm9mm  replied to  zuksam @3.2.10    3 weeks ago
They build their nests in that square tubing that makes up the base and frame of the shipping containers.

I was stung by some bees that built a nest in the locking port on a shipping container when I went to lock it on the chassis.  (Fortunately, driving big truck was a VERY short career!!)

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.13  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @3.2.11    3 weeks ago
Fresh fish in San Pedro coming right off the fishing boats. Great restaurants

Fresh ANYTHING is great and better than what we've been forced to endure in 'supermarkets'.   And great restaurants always seem to be around those sources of FRESH anything!!

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.14  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.12    3 weeks ago

Yeah, the twist locks can hold wasps, bees and assorted critters...LOL

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.15  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @3.2.14    3 weeks ago
Yeah, the twist locks can hold wasps, bees and assorted critters...LOL

That was something they never taught us when I went to training to get my CDL or any of the carriers I drove for!

I decided some wasp/bee/hornet spray was my new best friend!!

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.16  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.15    3 weeks ago

Another place that you could find nests was between the tandems on the chassis. I found that out the hard way...LOL

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.17  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @3.2.16    3 weeks ago
Another place that you could find nests was between the tandems on the chassis.

I never had to crawl that far under there to find that!!

 
 
 
Ender
3.2.18  Ender  replied to  Kavika @3.2.16    3 weeks ago

I had a wasp nest inside the side mirror on my Tahoe.

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.19  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.17    3 weeks ago

I was trying to get the axles slid all the way back on a 20'. tri-axle to move a very heavy load. The damn things were frozen so under I went with a crowbar and that's when I found the wasp nest..I didn't realize I could move that fast.

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2.20  Kavika   replied to  Ender @3.2.18    3 weeks ago

LOL, damn things can get in anywhere.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3.2.21  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Freefaller @3.2    3 weeks ago

My guess it that they stowed away in a shipping container.

 
 
 
zuksam
3.2.22  zuksam  replied to  Kavika @3.2.20    3 weeks ago
LOL, damn things can get in anywhere.

Wasps and yellowjackets love heat and they want a dry place to build their nests so any car, truck, trailer, or shed is prime nesting ground if it's not used regularly. I battle yellowjackets every year in my sheds, they're metal and metal seems more attractive to them than wood that's why they love junk cars. After years of experience if I need to pop the hood or work around a car that's been sitting I just assume there will be nests under the hood or in the fenders.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.2.23  sandy-2021492  replied to  zuksam @3.2.22    3 weeks ago

Hornets build nests in my grill every year without fail.

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.2.24  Tessylo  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.2.23    3 weeks ago

Regular bees don't really bother me.

Hornets, wasps though, scare the living daylights out of me.  

I used to smoke on my deck and in the summer time, if there were hornets or wasps around, I could see me literally going over the side of my balcony 3 stories down to get away from one.  They scare me that much.  

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.2.25  sandy-2021492  replied to  Tessylo @3.2.24    3 weeks ago

I swell like a balloon when I get stung, and itch for weeks.  So I wouldn't say I'm scared, but I definitely do what I can to avoid that experience.  Wouldn't jump off a balcony, though.  I AM scared of heights.

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.2.26  Tessylo  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.2.25    3 weeks ago

I tend to exaggerate just a tad . . . but they still do scare the living daylights out of me!  At any height!

 
 
 
zuksam
3.2.27  zuksam  replied to  Tessylo @3.2.26    3 weeks ago

I'm the opposite. once I know a nest is there I have to poke it with a stick and scrape it down. After I poke it I run but I go back I can't help myself, I have to battle them and I'll keep going back till they abandon that nesting area. The biggest problem is it wastes a lot of time when I'm supposed to be doing something else but I get sidetracked and I can't stop till they're gone or dead.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.2.28  Trout Giggles  replied to  zuksam @3.2.27    3 weeks ago

Hello, Little Brother!

My brother couldn't leave a bee's or wasps' nest alone, either. One time I was standing next to him when he was torturing the wasp.

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.2.29  Tessylo  replied to  zuksam @3.2.27    3 weeks ago

You're quite brave when it comes to this.

I like to give them a wide berth . . . 

 
 
 
zuksam
3.2.30  zuksam  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.2.28    3 weeks ago

I have funny story about a bee's nest. When I was about ten I was over a family friends house and they had a 15 year old son Gary. So Gary invited me to go fishing and on the way we walked through a meadow and there was a bunch of bees swarming over a hive in the ground. Well there was a 5 gallon bucket on the ground and Gary dared me to place it over the hive hole so I did it and the bees didn't bother me so then we went fishing. About four hours later we were coming back from fishing and we entered the meadow and Gary says "I Dare you to Kick that bucket". Well I was ten and wild so I didn't even think twice or reply I just took off running and kicked that bucket as hard as I could and I just kept running all the way back to Gary's house. The good news is I didn't even get stung once but I guess Gary wasn't ready when I ran to kick the bucket because he was forty feet behind me running and screaming the whole way as he got stung over and over like 50 times. He said the bucket must have been half full of bees when I kicked it because they formed a cloud of bees but I never saw any of it because I was running as fast as I could and never looked back.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.2.31  sandy-2021492  replied to  zuksam @3.2.27    3 weeks ago

The ones in my grill get roasted as a warning to their friends.  The ones who nest elsewhere get sprayed.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
3.2.32  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.2.28    3 weeks ago

Worked in the oil fields of Arkansas one summer.  I had never seen a wasp nest the size of a small trashcan lid before.

Three of us, cool early morning, can of wasp spray in each hand fought and won.  No injuries reported by the good guys!

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.2.33  Trout Giggles  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @3.2.32    3 weeks ago

YAY!!!!!

I was sitting on my front porch one afternoon, minding my own business and this wasp lands on my knee and stings me! I was pissed. Then I think I ended its worthless life

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.2.34  Trout Giggles  replied to  zuksam @3.2.30    3 weeks ago

ROFL!!!!!!!!!!

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3.2.35  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  zuksam @3.2.30    3 weeks ago

My husband raised bees and told me to run in a zig zag pattern if I ever found myself being chased by a swarm.

 
 
 
zuksam
3.2.36  zuksam  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @3.2.35    3 weeks ago

Good to know. I never believed I got away without being stung because I was so fast, I was just lucky to have someone a little slower behind me and I don't think the bees knew the difference.

 
 
 
Freefaller
3.2.37  Freefaller  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @3.2.35    3 weeks ago
My husband raised bees and told me to run in a zig zag pattern if I ever found myself being chased by a swarm.

So did my Dad, it doesn't work.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3.2.38  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Freefaller @3.2.37    3 weeks ago

It worked for me once. 

 
 
 
Freefaller
3.2.39  Freefaller  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @3.2.38    3 weeks ago

Lol, then I musta done it wrong.  No biggie while a little bit of an ouchie no other harm came from it.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
3.3  r.t..b...  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3    3 weeks ago
Murder hornets.

I claim dibs on the name for my yet to be formed alt/punk/jazz/zydeco band. Applicants apply here with qualifications...

 
 
 
zuksam
3.3.1  zuksam  replied to  r.t..b... @3.3    3 weeks ago

Sounds more like a Metal Band, maybe with dual lead guitars. First Album "Twice the Sting".

 
 
 
Eat The Press Do Not Read It
4  Eat The Press Do Not Read It    3 weeks ago

Certainly, we have had enough epidemics and natural disasters, but, humans must continue to interact with nature in a positive manner with science, and an educated understanding of the balance of nature.

We cannot continue to exploit, or, allow the exploitation of our planet for solely MONETARY GAINS for a few!

We are a part of Nature, not above or below it. It is our task to find the BALANCE.

 
 
 
The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"
5  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"    3 weeks ago

Are people really worried about this?

Remember the African honey bee hysteria? It's going to be fine. If you get stung, put some lotion on it.

"It rubs the lotion on it's skin or else it gets stung again.:

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
5.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen" @5    3 weeks ago
If you get stung, put some lotion on it.

Ummm... I die if I get stung. No joke. It is my only allergy other than a few meds that I can avoid. 

 
 
 
The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"
5.1.1  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @5.1    3 weeks ago

I'll carry an emergency Epipen for ya.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
5.1.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @5.1    2 weeks ago
Ummm... I die if I get stung. No joke. It is my only allergy other than a few meds that I can avoid. 

I have a similar allergy, only mine is related to mosquitoes. I am allergic to their saliva, and the chemical they inject into their bite wound to keep the blood from coagulating while they feed. One bite makes me very sick and run a high fever.  3 bites and I am in the ER or ICU. 5 or more bites and I am a gonner, as there is no antidote that will counter their chemicals, and EpiPens are no help at all. And the places where they bite me turn into huge boils within an hour or so after they finish feeding That is the only allergy that I have.

So when the mosquitoes come around in the summer I have to be very careful to avoid them. And I have to wear a Medical alert bracelet stating my allergy issue with mosquitoes. So far I have been fortunate to have only been in the ER and then the ICU once in my life from their bites, which is more than enough.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
6  Trout Giggles    3 weeks ago

We've already had a problem with honeybee hive collapse disorder or whatever it's called, we definitely don't need some hornet decapitating the gentle honeybees. I hope Washington State is on the job

 
 
 
The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"
8  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"    3 weeks ago

Can i buy these covered in chocolate on Amazon?

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
8.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen" @8    3 weeks ago

They look big enough for a family of four. 

 
 
 
Freefaller
8.2  Freefaller  replied to  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen" @8    3 weeks ago
Can i buy these covered in chocolate on Amazon?

Possibly, but this is more traditional

The giant hornet, along with other varieties of wasps, has traditionally been considered a delicacy in this rugged part of the country. The grubs are often preserved in jars, pan-fried or steamed with rice to make a savory dish called hebo-gohan. The adults, which can be two inches long, are fried on skewers, stinger and all, until the carapace becomes light and crunchy. They leave a warming, tingling sensation when eaten.

The hornets can also give liquor an extra kick. Live specimens are drowned in shochu, a clear distilled beverage. In their death throes, the insects release their venom into the liquid, and it is stored until it turns a dark shade of amber.

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/in-japan-the-murder-hornet-is-both-a-lethal-threat-and-a-tasty-treat/ar-BB13CZiF?li=AAggFp4&ocid=ASUDHP

 
 
 
jungkonservativ111
9  jungkonservativ111    3 weeks ago

Oh god here we go again. Better shutdown the whole economy in case 1 person dies by bee sting. 🙄

 
 
 
MrFrost
9.1  MrFrost  replied to  jungkonservativ111 @9    3 weeks ago

Oh god here we go again. Better shutdown the whole economy in case 1 person dies by bee sting. 🙄

When they get to 75,000 dead in ~60 days. Then it will be a problem. 

 
 
 
Krishna
10  Krishna    3 weeks ago

Trump is preparing a statement about how the Chinese government deliberately sent them here (so he will increasing tariffs even more...).

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
10.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Krishna @10    3 weeks ago

Would those tariffs include the crap him and his family peddle?

 
 
 
JaneDoe
11  JaneDoe    3 weeks ago

384

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
11.1  Just Jim NC TttH  replied to  JaneDoe @11    3 weeks ago

320

 
 
 
JaneDoe
11.1.1  JaneDoe  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @11.1    3 weeks ago

You must buy it all! Every available roll! 

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
11.1.2  Just Jim NC TttH  replied to  JaneDoe @11.1.1    3 weeks ago

jrSmiley_12_smiley_image.gif     jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
MrFrost
11.1.3  MrFrost  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @11.1    3 weeks ago

I totally get the TP buying craze during the COVID pandemic... I mean, no one wants to die with a dirty ass. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
12  MrFrost    3 weeks ago

Give it a week or two, some televangelist will proclaim it's part of the end times prophecy and rake in a few million. Just like the flat earth folks spreading their propaganda and lies to make a buck through merchandising. The up side is if there is a food shortage, these look just big enough to pan fry with a touch of olive oil and sea salt. Also on the upside, I have absolute proof that the Earth is round, if it wasn't, cats would have pushed all the shit off the edge a long time ago. 

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
13  sandy-2021492    3 weeks ago

95761816_3065720780156314_73230663594897

 
 
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