Coronavirus has lifted the work-from-home stigma. How will that shape the future?

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  5 months ago  •  75 comments

By:   Daniella Silva (NBC News)

Coronavirus has lifted the work-from-home stigma. How will that shape the future?
Experts said past stigma around working from home has largely been lifted, and they expect much more remote work for the foreseeable future.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



The fast-moving coronavirus pandemic has forced millions of Americans to work from home, with no immediate end in sight. Dates for when employees will return to office buildings move later and later or remain uncertain for many companies.

On Tuesday, Twitter told its employees that many of them will be allowed to work from home in perpetuity, even after the pandemic ends. The move signaled a growing shift in attitudes in certain industries toward remote working — a change that could have lasting implications.

Gallup data from the end of April showed that 63 percent of U.S. employees said they had worked from home in the past seven days because of coronavirus concerns, a number that had doubled from 31 percent three weeks before.

Even as dozens of states have begun to partly reopen months after the initial shutdowns, experts said that past stigma around working from home has largely been lifted and that they expected much more remote work to be incorporated into office life for the foreseeable future.

"The views around work from home have completely changed," said Stanford University economist Nicholas Bloom, co-director of the productivity, innovation and entrepreneurship program at the nonprofit National Bureau of Economic Research. "There is no stigma around working from home now."

Bloom said that beyond the next year or two, he believes there could be "an explosion of working from home" in industries in which it was possible, "in part because we've all now tried it, we've got it up and running and invested our time and effort into it."

But future work-from-home scenarios would be very different from current conditions, Bloom said — not only would children be back at school, but it's likely that employees would still have the option of going into the office a few times a week.

"That, I think, will end up being the new norm, and that's a big step up, two to three times as much home working as we previously did," he said.

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Barbara Larson, a management professor at Northeastern University, also said she expected a trend toward less density in the office for at least the next year or two in industries in which remote work was feasible.

"But who knows how that could play out over a longer period of time?" she said.

An employee works from her home in Shanghai on March 9.Qilai Shen / Bloomberg via Getty Images

A study Bloom published in 2015 found that Chinese call-center employees took fewer breaks and were 13 percent more productive when working from home. He said that in the long run, the move toward increased remote working would benefit employers and employees.

Bloom said that usually working remotely was done on occasion and by choice. It provides a quiet, stable environment for employees — a situation at contrast with the current reality, which is fraught with public health concerns and extreme isolation.

Larson also said it was important not to "make sweeping generalizations" about remote working from the extreme conditions you're seeing during the pandemic.

"What you do want to be doing is looking for the bright spots in your workforce, what types of jobs are actually working out pretty well remotely," she said. "Where are there opportunities in deciding who comes back to the office first?"

Larson said it would be critical for companies and managers to be "very thoughtful and mindful of the way in which they are bringing people back into the office, not just from a public health standpoint.

"They need to be considering the nature of the jobs they have people doing and the individuals," she said.

Laurel Farrer, founder of Distribute Consulting and the Remote Work Association, said there was a very big difference between allowing remote working and adopting effective remote working strategies.

In the long run, companies will have to go a lot further to update their policies and communication to optimize their remote work settings and enhance their business operations, she said.

"They're not going to see that by just sending somebody home with a laptop. They really need to invest some intention and time into updating all their business operations to match this new way of working," she said.

Bloom said he believed the pandemic could also affect how we view sick leave.

"The stigma of taking sick leave, I think, will evaporate in part in the short run," he said, with companies terrified to have potentially contagious employees in the office. "How permanent that will be is hard to tell, but I think all of this is going to be a somewhat more permanent change. It will be more acceptable to take sick leave and more acceptable to work from home."

Bloom said that in the aftermath of the financial crisis, there were major pushes for regulation, which could happen in the years after the pandemic.

"There will be much more recognition that this is unlikely to be the last pandemic, so we want to make sure we're in better shape," Bloom said.

There could be "a massive regulatory push" to force companies to provide sick leave or health care, as the virus illustrates how low-wage, front-line workers without benefits have been forced to work, putting themselves and others at risk.

"It's the very group that you don't want coming in to work that tend to be those that don't get sick leave," he said. "A lot of the lowest-paid service-sector jobs that have the most contact with other people are the ones without sick leave."

190619-daniella-silva-byline2558_e76c889 Daniella Silva

Daniella Silva is a reporter for NBC News, specializing in immigration and inclusion issues, as well as coverage of Latin America.


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sandy-2021492
1  sandy-2021492    5 months ago

I can actually see a bit of a reversal happening - employees pushing back against working from home.  My work-from-home mom friends are struggling.  If their kids are young enough to need daycare, many of those aren't open right now.  So parents are often trying to work from home while parenting kids who haven't been off their family property for months and are bored brainless.  They're also trying to homeschool those kids while getting their own work done.  I can't see this as sustainable for the long term.

 
 
 
Kavika
1.1  Kavika   replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    5 months ago

I can see your point with children at home. On the other hand, it might be fine for those without children or single people. 

 
 
 
Krishna
1.1.1  Krishna  replied to  Kavika @1.1    4 months ago
I can see your point with children at home. On the other hand, it might be fine for those without children or single people. 

Good point-- not everyone has the same situation! (Just because everyone you know feels a certain way about an issue doesn't mean that everyone feels the same way!!!)

 
 
 
devangelical
1.2  devangelical  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    5 months ago

I think we're on the precipice of a cultural change with an unimaginable ripple effect on everything that will last at least a decade. the question is whether the economy can transition without bottoming out, being complicated by the pandemic. I see this as a golden opportunity to change the social, educational, and commercial infrastructure of america. necessity is the mother of invention and I'm confidant that innovation will lead the way forward. all of the hardware is installed, it's time to flip the switches. I'm not worried about American moms, the greatest multitaskers on the face of the planet, it's up to them to determine how the educational system should work for them and how to customize their child rearing needs to adapt to their own individual circumstances. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.3  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    5 months ago

After we get past this mess, if people work from home, they could still send their kids off to daycare, if need be.

 
 
 
Krishna
1.3.1  Krishna  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.3    4 months ago
After we get past this mess, if people work from home, they could still send their kids off to daycare, if need be.

Also-- another solution which would probably work for some couples with children-- and not work for others.

If only one person is working, and there's enough rooms, that person could spend most of the day locked in the room. And the parents teach that kids that you have to leave the one who's working (Mommy or Daddy) alone when they're working-- but can see them later in the day. (Or also at mealtimes-- after which they go back to their work-room). And after 5 they spend time with the family.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.4  XDm9mm  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    5 months ago

Great observation.   Have kids and then pay others to raise them. 

Whatever happened to the nuclear family and raising your own children with your values and beliefs as opposed to what others instill in the child?

In SOME circumstances, 'day care' is necessary, but I'm sorry, not all circumstances by any stretch of the imagination.  If one can't afford to have the child, DON'T.  If after the child is born, if expenses are that difficult, change your lifestyle a little.  Make that sacrifice for the child's sake as opposed to your desires.

 
 
 
Dulay
1.4.1  Dulay  replied to  XDm9mm @1.4    5 months ago
Whatever happened to the nuclear family and raising your own children with your values and beliefs as opposed to what others instill in the child?

The same thing that happened to blue collar jobs paying enough to raise a family to include benefits like healthcare and pensions. 

I find it ironic that when the nation needed women to step up and work in factories, nobody bitched about fucking up the nuclear family. Oh course, the minute men came home, most of those women were kicked to the curb, even those who were sole breadwinners for their family because their husbands had given their lives. 

BTFW, maybe my family is unique, though I doubt it, but my mother, grandmother and great grandmother ALL worked outside of the home/farm. Oh and NONE of them could afford a nanny or an au pair. In the 60's during the summertime, we older kids were the 'babysitters'. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.4.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Dulay @1.4.1    5 months ago

Hmmm.....both of my children were born while I was still in the Air Force. Maybe I shouldn't have had them because they went to the Child Development Center at 6 weeks so I could go back to work, but then I wouldn't have the happy, healthy, well-adjusted adult children I have now.

I really resent someone who thinks he is a know-it-all and knows what every family should do. I think our "friend" is channeling Dr Laura. We're not all the same. Some families benefit from stay at home moms and some families really need Mom to get out of the house to save her sanity.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
1.4.3  sandy-2021492  replied to  XDm9mm @1.4    5 months ago

These are nuclear families.  You are aware that most nuclear families have both parents working outside the home (usually), yes?  But your attempt at starting a mommy war is noted.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
1.4.4  sandy-2021492  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.4.2    5 months ago

Exactly.  One of the stressed out moms I had in mind holds a PhD in biology.  How dare she use that degree doing anything other than popping out babies and making macaroni art?

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
1.4.5  sandy-2021492  replied to  Dulay @1.4.1    5 months ago

The stay-at-home mother has usually been a feature of the fairly privileged.  Among the poorer folks, women have always worked on the family farm or in the family business.  They might not have had an income they could claim as their own, but they were generally not barefoot in the kitchen.  Young women with or without children worked, while older women who were no longer able to do hard labor raised the children.  Older children also worked outside the home.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.4.6  Trout Giggles  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1.4.4    5 months ago

She could do a Watson-Crick model of DNA with the macaroni!

 
 
 
MAGA
1.4.7  MAGA  replied to  XDm9mm @1.4    4 months ago

Bravo 👏!  So very well said.  As a parent, I sacrificed and saved so as to provide for the foster kids I had and the adopted son I have.  Im still into doing that and hope to take in more as long as my health will allow me to do it.  It’s all about the children in our lives, or as the motto of where I worked for 33 years; Kids first!  

 
 
 
MAGA
1.4.8  MAGA  replied to  Dulay @1.4.1    4 months ago

Those blue collar high paying manufacturing and energy jobs had been coming back before the virus was exported here.  They will be coming back more as we redo our supply chains for strategic items that need to be developed, grown, mined, manufactured here

 
 
 
Dulay
1.4.9  Dulay  replied to  MAGA @1.4.8    4 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Krishna
1.4.10  Krishna  replied to  XDm9mm @1.4    4 months ago
Whatever happened to the nuclear family and raising your own children with your values and beliefs as opposed to what others instill in the chil

Why does it have to be one or the other?

With the exception of thye minority of parents who home-school their kids, most parents instill their values on their kids when they're not at school  (or at least try to :-)), but when they send them off to a regular school teachers there instill their values (whether they do it consciously or not).

 
 
 
Steve Ott
1.4.11  Steve Ott  replied to  XDm9mm @1.4    4 months ago

Where I live, a lot of kids are raised by grandparents, as was I in the 60's. It isn't a new thing, it isn't because of welfare. It is because of lots of different circumstances. In my case, it was because of polio. Your one size fits all generalization simply doesn't work.

A lot of white americans don't seem to understand multi-generational living arrangements, but it is more common in the world than you would believe.

If one can't afford to have the child, DON'T.

From the above statement, you are obviously for abortion.

 
 
 
MUVA
1.4.12  MUVA  replied to  Steve Ott @1.4.11    4 months ago

My wife and I raised my grandson while his mom finished her schooling for almost two years.My grandmother raised two of my cousins one after a death and one because of mental health issues. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.5  Vic Eldred  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    4 months ago
My work-from-home mom friends are struggling.  If their kids are young enough to need daycare, many of those aren't open right now. 

That's the same thing i'm seeing only with a different result. Remember the most vulnerable segment of society in all of this?  The ones who are supposed to be quarantined? Those are the ones taking care of those kids - THE GRAND PARENTS!

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
1.5.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.5    4 months ago

Yeah, my parents kept my nephew for a few weeks around the time of a family funeral where they knew nobody would be keeping their distance.  He's a pretty easy kid to get along with, but he eats like 3 horses.  Mom did nothing but cook and wash dishes those two weeks.  But they didn't want him to be exposed.  And at least they're retired, and don't have to be productive for an employer with kids in the house.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
2  FLYNAVY1    5 months ago

Not going to have to worry about it in any case as we slide into a full blown depression in the fall as infection ramps back up.

 
 
 
MUVA
2.1  MUVA  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @2    5 months ago

No

 
 
 
devangelical
2.2  devangelical  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @2    5 months ago

meh, the next go round will take out more of the ignorant instead of the vulnerable.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
2.2.1  FLYNAVY1  replied to  devangelical @2.2    4 months ago

Wisconsin for instance....?

 
 
 
evilgenius
2.2.2  evilgenius  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @2.2.1    4 months ago
Wisconsin for instance....?

Our fucking State Legislature and dumb ass SC has wasted all the sacrifices we've done the last 2 months. They just flushed it all down the toilet for partisan politics. It really pisses me off.

 
 
 
Ender
2.2.3  Ender  replied to  evilgenius @2.2.2    4 months ago
D emocratic swing-state governors are struggling to contain GOP revolts over lockdown measures, a development President Trump is betting will work in his favor on Election Day.

.

Republicans are betting on unrest in another swing state, Wisconsin, to drive a surge of support for Trump. The state Supreme Court sided Wednesday with the GOP legislators who sued Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’s administration in April over his strict lockdown measures. The conservative majority court ruled that the governor “cannot rely on emergency powers indefinitely.”

Once the ruling came out, Trump showed his support for the Republican movement to reopen in a tweet, writing , “The Great State of Wisconsin, home to Tom Tiffany’s big Congressional Victory on Tuesday, was just given another win. Its Democrat Governor was forced by the courts to let the State Open. The people want to get on with their lives. The place is bustling!"

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/elections-2020/trump-bets-on-gop-led-revolts-in-swing-states-for-election-support/ar-BB146QxO?li=BBnb7Kz

It is all about getting reelected.

 
 
 
evilgenius
2.2.4  evilgenius  replied to  Ender @2.2.3    4 months ago
It is all about getting reelected.

Yes, and they are taking a gamble that this won't bite them in the ass before November. If cases spike anywhere in the state high enough to be significant Trump is toast here.

 
 
 
MAGA
2.2.5  MAGA  replied to  evilgenius @2.2.2    4 months ago

The governor and legislature could come together to create new rules they jointly agree to.  That’s all the Supreme Court said.  That the governor can’t impose unilaterally. The legislature will work with the governor to create a mutually agreed upon plan.  Right now the governor is pouting about his loss of dictator control freak god complex powers and hoping something bad happens so he can blame them rather than lower himself to actually have to deal with them as his equals.  

 
 
 
Krishna
2.2.6  Krishna  replied to  Ender @2.2.3    4 months ago
It is all about getting reelected.

Yes-- that's the problem when you have a system where the people choose who runs the country ("Democracy")>

Ofcourse there is a way to avoid that problem-- you can have a system where one person ahs absolute control (or one self-appointed committee. (that's called a dictatorship-- which of course avoids the problem of having to have elections).

 
 
 
MAGA
2.3  MAGA  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @2    4 months ago

There is no certainty that there will be another outbreak in the fall or winter.  We all hope not.  It could mutate itself out of dangerous existence like SARS, another corona virus did over the next 4-6 months as well.  

 
 
 
Krishna
2.3.1  Krishna  replied to  MAGA @2.3    4 months ago
There is no certainty that there will be another outbreak in the fall or winter.  We all hope not.  It could mutate itself out of dangerous existence like SARS, another corona virus did over the next 4-6 months as well.  

Indeed. As you mention, there's no certainty.

Which also raises the possibility that it could mutate itself into a more virulent form...for example, one that also attacks young healthy people in much larger numbers.

Or-- one where the death rate of those infected is much, much higher than that of the current strain of Covad-19.

 
 
 
MUVA
3  MUVA    5 months ago

Seems people are more productive not spending as much time talking to their fellow employees while working from home.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
3.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  MUVA @3    5 months ago

Yeah, but instead of hanging out at the coffee machine, at home it's the refrigerator.

 
 
 
Veronica
3.1.1  Veronica  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.1    5 months ago

Yeah, that has been a big problem for me.

 
 
 
Krishna
3.1.2  Krishna  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.1    4 months ago
Yeah, but instead of hanging out at the coffee machine, at home it's the refrigerator.

For some folks.

But then there are others who do have more self control....

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
3.1.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @3.1.2    4 months ago

Meaning you?

 
 
 
Krishna
3.2  Krishna  replied to  MUVA @3    4 months ago
Seems people are more productive not spending as much time talking to their fellow employees while working from home.

The problem with that sort of over-generalization is...that its not true in all cases.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
4  Buzz of the Orient    5 months ago

Decades ago, when I had a second home situated on a northern lake, I wished that I could have worked from it instead of in a city office.  Phones, computers and the internet make it possible - but then I'm the guy who wants to be beamed back to the early 50s. LOL

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
5  Trout Giggles    5 months ago

My job is too much paper in paper out for me to work at home. I do quite a bit of stuff on line such as data entry and letter writing but the letters have to be signed, copied, then filed.

I wouldn't mind working from him a few days of week, but I would have to come in to the office the other days

 
 
 
Veronica
5.1  Veronica  replied to  Trout Giggles @5    5 months ago

 I have been working from home since March 19th. I went into the office for the first time yesterday.  Had my mask and gloves on until I reached my office.  Had a meeting with my supervisor and co-worker in the office separated by at least 6 feet to discuss what needs to be done on my furlough weeks.  I am going on one week on, one week off starting Monday.  My supervisor thought I would be more upset, but I have realized through the years there are some things you cannot change & no use stressing on them.  When I left my office to go home I put on my mask and gloves and walked out.  Outside I took them off and breathed the fresh air which was actually warmer than it has been.    

 
 
 
Krishna
5.2  Krishna  replied to  Trout Giggles @5    4 months ago
My job is too much paper in paper out for me to work at home. I do quite a bit of stuff on line such as data entry and letter writing but the letters have to be signed, copied, then filed. I wouldn't mind working from him a few days of week, but I would have to come in to the office the other days

I think that in some occupations people can work entirely at home-- and in fact for some its better in every way.

For others, it really only works out if they go into the workplace every day.

However while we're debating whether or not working from home will happen in the future (after the virus) we are over-looking a third possibility: in some professions the best approach may be to work at home some days-- and go into the workplace on others.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
5.2.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Krishna @5.2    4 months ago

That's what I would like. Go into the office, pick up my papers, and come back in maybe a few days later

 
 
 
Freefaller
6  Freefaller    5 months ago

Lol no impact here as I can't imagine the military ever being a work from home organization

 
 
 
Krishna
6.1  Krishna  replied to  Freefaller @6    4 months ago
Lol no impact here as I can't imagine the military ever being a work from home organization

For most that's true.

But I would imagine that there arer many in the military who could. (Some who currently have routine "office jobs" and are never out in the field. Perhaps those who have supervisory position in Intelligence for example. And/or other sorts of "paper-pushers"?)

 
 
 
Greg Jones
7  Greg Jones    5 months ago

Not all that many people can work at home. I suppose it's fine for professionals in some fields, but most people have to "go to work",

which is why the highways are always filled up at rush hour.

 
 
 
Krishna
7.1  Krishna  replied to  Greg Jones @7    4 months ago
which is why the highways are always filled up at rush hour.

I'm sure most people here have noticed that.

Its probably because of the Virus. (More peole are driving to work because of it. And of course more have been going nout more-- driving to restaurants, sporting events, bars, etc).

 
 
 
It Is ME
8  It Is ME    5 months ago

I've been working from home for over 15 years !

It's Great ….until the Grandkids need "Sitting" for awhile. Don't get much work done then. jrSmiley_78_smiley_image.gif

But that's Okay …… NOW ! jrSmiley_15_smiley_image.gif

If it was "In the Before Time".....it wouldn't have been so great. jrSmiley_44_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Dulay
9  Dulay    5 months ago

One question I have had about all of this work at home and homeschooling is WHO pays for the internet access? I saw an article from South Bend, IN about school buses, parked in strategic areas, are providing WiFi, allowing low income kids to keep up with their school work. That has to get harder the more rural the community. 

 
 
 
MAGA
9.1  MAGA  replied to  Dulay @9    4 months ago

There will be more home schooling and more working at home after this is all over and that likely means more people living in exurban, small town, and rural areas. 

 
 
 
Dulay
9.1.1  Dulay  replied to  MAGA @9.1    4 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
10  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.    5 months ago

Matt worked from home for about 10 years and loved it. Believe it or not, I am the one who has to go out and see my clients (although it looks like I never leave here, I work in the mornings...). Still, now I have been working at home mostly. If I need to get some paperwork, they leave it outside for me. 

 
 
 
Snuffy
11  Snuffy    5 months ago

As it's been talked about not every job can be done remotely. But for those that can be, like most things in business I believe this will follow a cyclical pattern.  A few years back Google, PayPal and a bunch of other companies all were heavily into work-from-home as a benefit. That was offered as a hiring inducement. Then a few years back Google ran into quality and performance issues and determined it was due to people not being able to meet to work thru coding problems and they mandated people come into the office.  Many other companies followed suit to have a larger presence in the office.  So IMO this will be cyclical like most everything else in the business world.  WFH will be a feature for a few years and then some new management style will take over where they want people to meet face to face,  until that also is replaced by something else. 

I'm fortunate that I'm in an industry where I can work remotely, all I need is a good internet connection and I can work anywhere. As I'm high risk for this damn virus I enjoy working from home as much as I enjoy not having to get dressed for a day in the office.  And I have my work laptop camera blocked so they cannot see what I am not wearing (so nobody better tell on me or I will hunt you down!!!!)  

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
11.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Snuffy @11    5 months ago
then some new management style will take over where they want people to meet face to face,  until that also is replaced by something else. 

Have you heard of ZOOM? I think it might be that technical thingy that could be used for multi-person meetings. One might also be able to use it to collaborate on a project.

And I have my work laptop camera blocked so they cannot see what I am not wearing (so nobody better tell on me or I will hunt you down!!!!)  

You're not wearing pants, are you?

 
 
 
Snuffy
11.1.1  Snuffy  replied to  Trout Giggles @11.1    5 months ago

I work for a very large company and we have had remote meetings for many years using various tools including WebEx.  From what I've heard of Zoom, it's not as secure as it needs to be and as I'm working in the health insurance industry and we must be careful with personal information all of our networks are hardened and encrypted. But we've had multi-person meetings for years now as we have offices all around the world. My team runs from East Coast to West Coast to India.

and who told  you?   I wanna know who's leaking...   is it my dog?  oh wait,  don't have a dog...   come on,  who's spilling the beans?????  

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
11.1.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Snuffy @11.1.1    4 months ago

Your cat?

Zoom is not all that secure? Sure wish somebody would tell my doctor that. We had an on-line consult with Zoom a couple of weeks ago.

 
 
 
Snuffy
11.1.3  Snuffy  replied to  Trout Giggles @11.1.2    4 months ago

yeah, it's called ZOOM BOMBING.  I guess there are ways to lock it down but if it's a public meeting there will be other issues....

 
 
 
Krishna
11.1.4  Krishna  replied to  Trout Giggles @11.1    4 months ago
Have you heard of ZOOM?

I had been on Zoom for occasional meeting long before the virus.(It was for some courses I was taking-- I found the Zoom meetings were just as successful as the in-person meetings).

However since the virus, I now find I go to Zoom meetings 2 or 3 times/week. 

 
 
 
Krishna
11.1.5  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @11.1.4    4 months ago
However since the virus, I now find I go to Zoom meetings 2 or 3 times/week

I received a sales pitch to open a Zoom account. I signed up for a free trial account. It has some limitations of course-- IIRC there's a limit to the # of people in the sessions, the sessions are limited to 45 minutes, and it doesn't have many other grea features. I"ve been meaning to use it-- instead of phone calls to friends I've been meaning to have one on one Zooms sessions, but haven't done it yet.

 
 
 
Baron Creek
12  Baron Creek    5 months ago

Sounds like working from home might be the new thing. Of course, companies can see the immediate benefit of reducing office space (investment) and while working from home is not exactly off-shoring... it can be, and the testing is starting now. 

 
 
 
Baron Creek
12.1  Baron Creek  replied to  Baron Creek @12    5 months ago
 
 
 
Freefaller
12.1.1  Freefaller  replied to  Baron Creek @12.1    5 months ago

Seems to me this is a reasonable course of action for companies to take when there is cause or suspicions

 
 
 
MAGA
12.1.2  MAGA  replied to  Baron Creek @12.1    4 months ago

I saw an article where they can see what you are doing, clicking on, looking at if you are using their computers or tablets or import their work programs into yours.  

 
 
 
Baron Creek
12.1.3  Baron Creek  replied to  MAGA @12.1.2    4 months ago

Generally speaking, businesses provide smart phones, laptops, etc., so they have the right to install whatever software they wish, although I would imagine the software is cloud based for licensing purposes. 

 
 
 
Krishna
12.2  Krishna  replied to  Baron Creek @12    4 months ago
Sounds like working from home might be the new thing

It is. Although to some degree its not that new. 

There's little doubt in my mind that it will really take off in the future.

 
 
 
Baron Creek
12.2.1  Baron Creek  replied to  Krishna @12.2    4 months ago

It seems people are extolling the positives, without considering the negatives, imo. That will come in time, as social distancing becomes social disconnect in the workplace. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
13  TᵢG    5 months ago

There is no doubt in my mind that working from home will increase.   It is not appropriate for everyone (of course) and even some who could do their jobs at home might not have the discipline to be successful at it.   Also, I expect a marked reduction in physical business meetings.   The idea that not 'pressing the flesh' is a sign of a lack of commitment has been lessened.   Businesses will benefit greatly by reducing travel expenses and the utterly insane loss of productivity that goes with them.  

Airlines, hotels, cruise lines, etc. will struggle for the foreseeable future.   In particular, I would not want to be an airline CEO right now.   They have a near impossible challenge to address.

 
 
 
devangelical
13.1  devangelical  replied to  TᵢG @13    4 months ago

I'd divest from any REIT's and multifamily housing corps asap. 

 
 
 
MAGA
13.1.1  MAGA  replied to  devangelical @13.1    4 months ago

I wouldn’t now if one hasn’t already.  Why sell a bloodbath loss at a low?  Simon Property Group is down between 67and 75% and they have a lot of mall properties which are about to re open.  As to owning apartment buildings, many are urban and their tenants are the ones who are least likely to be able to work at home and move to the country.  REIT’s are a stable dividend bearing tool to provide income for seniors and those nearing retirement and offer a way to own property for those of us who can’t afford to directly own more real estate than our home and our burial plot.  

 
 
 
Krishna
13.1.2  Krishna  replied to  MAGA @13.1.1    4 months ago
REIT’s are a stable dividend bearing tool to provide income for seniors and those nearing retirement and offer a way to own property for those of us who can’t afford to directly own more real estate than our home and our burial plot.  

A stable dividend bearing tool-- until they're not. As profits tank, they will cut dividends (some already have).

 
 
 
Krishna
13.1.3  Krishna  replied to  MAGA @13.1.1    4 months ago

Why sell a bloodbath loss at a low?  

Because they could go even lower....(?)

 
 
 
Krishna
13.2  Krishna  replied to  TᵢG @13    4 months ago
Airlines, hotels, cruise lines, etc. will struggle for the foreseeable future.   In particular, I would not want to be an airline CEO right now.   They have a near impossible challenge to address.

True enough.

Unless, of course, the Trump administration decides to bail them out. (perhaps they have already said they would..IDK as I've never really followed airline stocks).

 
 
 
Steve Ott
14  Steve Ott    4 months ago

I work in litigation support/legal technology. And while we have always had the ability to work from home (everything is web based) it wasn't always easy. The company allowed a period of two days for people to go the the office and grab all of their equipment when the lockdowns started. Personally, I enjoy working from home more now. We've been working from home for  8 weeks now.

If we were to go back to the office, it would have to be drastically altered, or they would have to stagger schedules, if they were to accommodate the 6 foot rule.

Below is an article from the The HIll by Joe Andrew, the global chairman of the largest law firm you've probably never heard of, Dentons.

Let's stop asking 'When are we going back to the office?'

 
 
 
freepress
15  freepress    4 months ago

I would think more than half of all office jobs or most tech jobs should be able to work from home. Just think of the lower insurance rates from not having to drive, less pollution, less wear and tear on the roads saving local and state expenditures. Companies also need to consider the cost savings of being able to use much small buildings, the savings in energy costs by allowing employees to work from home. They could even aid employees by offering a monthly stipend for their utilities and internet costs since the employees remain under the company as regular employees as opposed to outside contractors.

 
 
 
Steve Ott
16  Steve Ott    4 months ago

Welcome to the pre-1900's, albeit a little more technologically advanced.

 
 
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