It’s time to bury the myth of Texas exceptionalism

  

Category:  Op/Ed

Via:  john-russell  •  one week ago  •  67 comments

It’s time to bury the myth of Texas exceptionalism
Deeper is the failure of leadership, which the present crisis has placed on full display. Though Judge Clay Jenkins of Dallas County has definitely been a steady hand in the crisis, a number of other Texas politicians have been busily employing shameless gaslighting and partisan scapegoating to keep their partisan bases warm and toasty.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



www.washingtonpost.com   /opinions/its-time-to-bury-the-myth-of-texas-exceptionalism/2021/02/17/1dadd114-715a-11eb-85fa-e0ccb3660358_story.html

It’s time to bury the myth of Texas exceptionalism


Karen Attiah

5-6 minutes



Leave it to a blackout to shine a big, bright spotlight on the problems lying deep in the heart of Texas.

I grew up in a suburb south of Dallas, and even though my parents were immigrants from West Africa, I was conditioned to believe in Texan exceptionalism. In high school debate, the question of whether the Lone Star State should secede from the union was a yearly issue. I argued absolutely yes. “We are fine on our own! We have our own power grid!”

Well, I was wrong.

This week, wrapped in multiple blankets and layers, I could only laugh at my past faith in Texas’s supposedly mighty grid. A winter storm might have been the precipitating event that left   millions of Texans struggling without power   in record-low temperatures. But what really has brought my home state to its knees is a chilling mix of unfettered deregulation, partisan gaslighting and   leadership failure .



Millions of Texans are enduring freezing temperatures amid a large-scale failure of the state’s power grid. (Lindsey Sitz, Spike Johnson/The Washington Post)

Was   anyone   prepared? Though utilities knew the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the state-energy regulator known as ERCOT, planned possible outages,   residents did not get   advance warning. Many of us in Dallas scrambled to try to find shelter and warmth, only to run into hotels that were full or also without power. Snow and ice on the roads caused fatal car accidents. In Fort Worth, residents were advised to boil water, because power had been shut off to treatment facilities.

Texans caring for newborns, the elderly or sick family members — covid-19 takes no time off for bad weather — tweeted in anger and desperation. Hospitals faced an influx of hypothermia cases. A   woman and young girl in Houston   died after being poisoned by carbon monoxide from a car being run in an effort to generate heat. There had been   at least 10 deaths   in the state as of Tuesday.

Deregulation is clearly a central part of the answer . In the 2000s, Texas leaders opted to deregulate our independent power grid, leaving providers with no incentive to prepare for infrequent risks. After a 2011 cold spell produced a crisis,   federal regulators warned   that the state needed to invest in winterizing the energy supply infrastructure. That advice went unheeded. You can draw a direct line from there to market absurdities such as those we saw this week, when the wholesale price of electricity in Houston spiked from $22 a megawatt-hour to about $9,000, while 4 million Texas homes had no power.

Deeper is the failure of leadership, which the present crisis has placed on full display. Though Judge Clay Jenkins of Dallas County has definitely been a steady hand in the crisis, a number of other Texas politicians have been busily employing shameless gaslighting and partisan scapegoating to keep their partisan bases warm and toasty. In a now-deleted Facebook post, former Colorado City mayor Tim Boyd blasted his city’s residents for being “lazy” and instructed them to “ quit crying and looking for a handout!

Gov. Greg Abbott (R), a day before he gave a formal address to Texans on the disaster on his watch, popped up on Fox News to assert that the blackouts were somehow evidence that Democrats’ Green New Deal would not work. Abbott joined a chorus on the right blaming frozen wind turbines for the shambolic power situation — though wind accounts for only about 10 percent of the state’s winter power supply.

But Republican former governor   Rick Perry , also a former U.S. energy secretary, was the one who boiled it all down to that Texas mythos, saying, “Texans would be without electricity for longer than three days to keep the federal government out of their business.” Talk about a Texas-size delusion. Our suffering is worth it, so long as we can stick it to the feds!

And this is what’s so agonizing about this moment. Our culture of rugged individualism puts the burden on vulnerable Texans to survive together, as best we can, overlaying crises caused by systemic failures of leadership. We were already struggling with covid-19. We were already having to cope with reduced incomes and job loss. Families were already having to keep up with distance learning. Given these interlocking challenges, real leadership should have meant acting with foresight, and sparing no expense, to ensure that Texans could access power and heat through the winter.

Instead, our suffering is compounded by Republican leaders who would rather serve up stale, partisan talking points than do what is best for Texans. We deserve so much better.

At the time of this writing, I still do not know when power will be restored to my apartment. In the meantime, my friends in Africa, with experience with public health crises and load shedding by utilities, are sending me tips on how to manage.

Texan exceptionalism? I love my home state, but it’s time for that myth to come to a cold, dead end.



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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one week ago

Texas seems to be attracted to dumb politicians on a state wide basis. Former governor Rick Perry is a well known glad handing dimwit, and the current governor Greg Abbott seems cut from the same cloth. I wonder what the late great Ann Richards and Molly Ivins would have thought of all this. 

(PS let's not forget George W, another former governor of Texas)

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Guide
1.1  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one week ago

John, you live in Illinois. Glass houses and everything. 

At the end of the day, Americans are migrating to Texas and fleeing Illinois. People vote with their feet. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @1.1    one week ago

Texas has better weather, as long as you enjoy twenty or thirty 100 degree days in a row. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.1.2  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    one week ago

That's why we have air conditioning here.

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
1.1.3  cjcold  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.2    one week ago

With no consequences?

Please get around to finally seceding from the union. 

Pretty sure that the rest of the USA can get along without Texas' ego.

Been through Texas many times and never saw anything exceptional.

(except for a lady named Joyce S. from Fabens that I met at Six Flags in my youth).

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.1.4  Texan1211  replied to  cjcold @1.1.3    one week ago
With no consequences?

I have no earthly idea--none at all--what THAT comment has to do with mine.

Please get around to finally seceding from the union. 

I have no plans to ever secede from the union. I will leave that to the only people who actually have done so--Democrats.

Pretty sure that the rest of the USA can get along without Texas' ego.

Oh, I am quite sure the United States can survive without any one particular state.

Just as I am sure that having all 50 states remain makes us stronger.

Been through Texas many times and never saw anything exceptional.

Different people see different things.  

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
1.1.5  cjcold  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.4    one week ago

The consequences of unsustainable energy use.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.1.6  Texan1211  replied to  cjcold @1.1.5    one week ago

Are you even remotely suggesting that Americans should forego air conditioning?

Fat chance.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Guide
1.1.7  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    one week ago

With murders and carjackings, skyrocketing this is what politicians are focused on in Illinois:

Getting rid of Abe Lincoln statues.   Once that statue of William McKinley comes down, world peace is inevitable. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.1.8  Texan1211  replied to  Sean Treacy @1.1.7    one week ago

Oh, thank goodness!
I am positive the majority of Chicagoans can rest easy tonight knowing their city is on top of a bunch of old statues which probably over half the people know nothing about.

Whew!!

I bet the victims of recent shootings and their families will be relieved to see the city and mayor laser-focused on the statues which caused them to get shot!

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1.1.9  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  cjcold @1.1.3    one week ago

The beefsteak at the Traildust in Dallas was pretty good, and the roast brisket sandwich in Fort Worth was the best I ever had in my life.  As well, I would have followed Anne Richards anywhere. 

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
1.2  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one week ago
Texas seems to be attracted to dumb politicians on a state wide basis.

Lyndon Johnson, for example?

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.2.1  Texan1211  replied to  Tacos! @1.2    one week ago

Wendy Davis?

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.2.2  Texan1211  replied to  Tacos! @1.2    one week ago

Julian Castro?

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
1.2.3  cjcold  replied to  Tacos! @1.2    one week ago

When was the last time you were picked up by your ears?

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
1.2.4  Tacos!  replied to  Texan1211 @1.2.2    one week ago

I guess JR was right! jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.2.5  Texan1211  replied to  Tacos! @1.2.4    one week ago

Indubitably!

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
1.2.6  Tacos!  replied to  cjcold @1.2.3    one week ago

We have basset hounds. Talk about ears! It’s too bad LBJ didn’t have a couple of those.

 
 
 
Gazoo
Freshman Silent
1.2.8  Gazoo  replied to  Texan1211 @1.2.2    one week ago

How could one forget orourke?

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
1.2.9  Texan1211  replied to  Gazoo @1.2.8    one week ago

And Bernice Johnson!

 
 
 
SteevieGee
Junior Silent
2  SteevieGee    one week ago

 “Texans would be without electricity for longer than three days to keep the federal government out of their business.”

Says the guy with a backup generator in his yard.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
3  Thrawn 31    one week ago

There was a myth of Texas exceptionalism? I’ve been to/through Texas a few times and didn’t see anything even remotely exceptional, it was pretty much just like the rest of the country. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.1  Texan1211  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    one week ago

It's hard for non-Texans to understand.

 
 
 
devangelical
Masters Expert
3.1.1  devangelical  replied to  Texan1211 @3.1    one week ago

...like conservative xtian stupidity...

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.1.2  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @3.1.1    one week ago
...like conservative xtian stupidity...

jrSmiley_81_smiley_image.gif

It always amazes me how you can manage to turn virtually any topic into a rant about Christian conservatives!!

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Participates
3.1.3  Hallux  replied to  Texan1211 @3.1.2    one week ago

A rant has more than 4 words:

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.1.4  Texan1211  replied to  Hallux @3.1.3    one week ago

SOSDD

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
3.1.5  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @3.1.3    one week ago

So am I.

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Participates
3.1.6  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3.1.5    one week ago

I noticed ...

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Participates
3.2  Hallux  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    one week ago

I've driven through just about all of the lower 48 and Hawaii ... hell, even New Jersey has some exceptional aspects. I will say Arkansas has some exceptionally hellish aspects.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
3.2.1  Split Personality  replied to  Hallux @3.2    one week ago

I took a short cut out of NC recently, staying on 25 out of Ashville to Newport and on to 81. 

It was stunning in it's desolation and poverty and was gobsmacked to see people exit what appeared to be homes that collapsed decades ago.

Having lived in an unincorporated part of the Lowlands of SC where zoning was nonexistent and your McMansion could next to a double wide with 5 decades of cars and appliances in the front yard,  I thought I was jaded to absolute rural poverty.  I am not.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
PhD Guide
3.3  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    one week ago

I was stationed in TX (Ft Sam) 7 times in 7 years, the longest period being three years.  I never noticed any myth of exceptionalism either.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
3.4  Tacos!  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    one week ago

At some point it apparently became arrogant, shameful, and fascist (and probably racist) to simply be proud of the place you live.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
3.4.1  Tessylo  replied to  Tacos! @3.4    one week ago

Blah, blah, blah

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
3.4.2  evilgenius  replied to  Tacos! @3.4    one week ago

Arrogance taken to extremes does become fascist and should be shameful. The Bible even speaks of it.

Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall.

Proverbs 16:18

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
3.5  cjcold  replied to  Thrawn 31 @3    one week ago
just like the rest of the country.

Except a lot hotter.

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Participates
4  Hallux    one week ago

I've only driven through the panhandle ... it was exceptionally flat, And Amarillo? Meh, church next door to tattoo parlor next door to steakhouse next door to gun store next door to church next door to ... hey babe, nice lamppost, does it have a door? ... ad infinitum.

 
 
 
bbl-1
PhD Quiet
5  bbl-1    one week ago

Texas exceptionalism;  Summed up in two ways.

1.  Private for profit corporate rule.  Supply Side on Dexamphetamine during weekdays and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on weekends, especially Sundays.  

2.  Make sure there are more ( steeples than trees--an old DC lyric-- ) to assure rule number one never changes.  

 
 
 
JBB
PhD Principal
6  JBB    one week ago

While you can always tell a Texan you can never tell a dang olde Texan much. Texans are the worst listeners...

Texas is a big state with low taxes, poor services, little regulation, a harsh climate and not much else to its credit. I lived there for a decade. Don't miss it.

 
 
 
shona1
Freshman Participates
6.1  shona1  replied to  JBB @6    one week ago

Morning jbb. I use to work with a lot of Americans and one was from Texas. He use to rabbit on about how everything was bigger in Texas etc than the rest of the States or here.

Anyway I got tired of him and just pointed out one day the size of Texas would not even rate here. Said when you have a State that is roughly the size of a third of your country get back to me..never did hear anymore about Texas.

I am quite sure Texans can take being bagged out for the moment. No different to us here in Victoria. We are the flavour of the month with the other States as we stuffed up the quarantine with the virus and that resulted in 800 deaths. So our name is mud.

But it will pass as soon as the next disaster arrives in some form or other...and then the whole country once again pulls together...

The inter state rivalry is forgotten and we are suddenly all Australians and I am sure it is no different over there.

Just to add salt to the wound 35oC here today..sun surf and sand..sorry Texas...

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
6.1.1  Texan1211  replied to  shona1 @6.1    one week ago

Did you hear the joke about the Texan who went to New York?

A New Yorker was showing him around, took him to Niagara Falls, and proudly exclaimed "I bet you don't have anything like this in Texas!"

The Texan studied the Falls for a moment, then replied, "Nope, we sure don't. But we do have a plumber who can fix that leak!"

 
 
 
shona1
Freshman Participates
6.1.2  shona1  replied to  Texan1211 @6.1.1    one week ago

Thank you for the early morning laugh..

 
 
 
Dulay
PhD Principal
6.1.3  Dulay  replied to  Texan1211 @6.1.1    one week ago
The Texan studied the Falls for a moment, then replied, "Nope, we sure don't. But we do have a plumber who can fix that leak!"

They're going to need every fucking plumber they have and more for the next month or so...

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
7  seeder  JohnRussell    one week ago

Well some of them did die to protect slavery. 

San-Antonio-Alamo-101-Best-Time-To-Go-01.jpg

Two and a half million people visit the Alamo each year where, according to its website, “men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom,” making it “hallowed ground and the Shrine of Texas Liberty.”

There can be no doubt that the symbolism of the Alamo is at the center of the creation myth of Texas: that the state was forged out of a heroic struggle for freedom against a cruel Mexican dictator, Santa Ana. It represents to the Southwest what the Statue of Liberty represents to the Northeast: a satisfying confirmation of what we are supposedly about as a people.

But if Northeasterners can be excused for embracing a somewhat fuzzy notion of abstract liberty, the symbolism of the Alamo has always been built upon historical myth.

As the defenders of the Alamo were about to sacrifice their lives, other Texans were making clear the goals of the sacrifice at a constitutional convention for the new republic they hoped to create. In  Section 9 of the General Provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas , it is stated how the new republic would resolve their greatest problem under Mexican rule: “All persons of color who were slaves for life previous to their emigration to Texas, and who are now held in bondage, shall remain in the like state of servitude ... Congress shall pass no laws to prohibit emigrants from bringing their slaves into the republic with them, and holding them by the same tenure by which such slaves were held in the United States; nor shall congress have power to emancipate slaves.”

Mexico had in fact abolished slavery in 1829, causing panic among the Texas slaveholders, overwhelmingly immigrants from the south of the United States. They in turn sent Stephen Austin to Mexico City to complain. Austin was able to wrest from the Mexican authorities an exemption for the department -- Texas was technically a department of the state of Coahuila y Tejas -- that would allow the vile institution to continue. But it was an exemption reluctantly given, mainly because the authorities wanted to avoid rebellion in Texas when they already had problems in Yucatán and Guatemala. All of the leaders of Mexico, in itself only an independent country since 1821, were personally opposed to slavery, in part because of the influence of emissaries from the freed slave republic of Haiti. The exemption was, in their minds, a temporary measure and Texas slaveholders knew that.

The legality of slavery had thus been at best tenuous and uncertain at a time when demand for cotton -- the main slave-produced export -- was accelerating on the international market. A central goal of independence would be to remove that uncertainty.

The Mexican armies that entered the department to put down the rebellion had explicit orders to free any slaves that they encountered, and so they did. The only person spared in the retaking of the Alamo was Joe, the personal slave of William Travis.

Once the rebels succeeded in breaking Texas away from Mexico and establishing an independent republic, slavery took off as an institution. Between 1836 and 1840, the slave population doubled; it doubled again by 1845; and it doubled still again by 1850 after annexation by the United States. On the eve of the Civil War, which Texas would enter as a part of the Confederacy, there were 182,566 slaves, nearly one-third of the state’s population.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
7.1  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @7    one week ago

Ah yes. Let’s crap on the Alamo, too, while we’re at it.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
7.1.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Tacos! @7.1    one week ago

I have visited The Alamo, it was like a shrine and i was impressed.  But history is history. 

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
8  Split Personality    one week ago

Millions of Texans are enduring freezing temperatures amid a large-scale failure of the state’s power grid.

False and very old as the news about outages go.  Currently less than 20,000 in Dallas County, 485,000 in Houston.

Current high temp is expected to to be 29 degrees rising to 38 tomorrow.  Just the increase has brought some coal

and natural gas plants back on line automatically.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
8.1  Split Personality  replied to  Split Personality @8    one week ago

Abbott is currently on TV saying that no home in Texas will be without power tonight.

WTF?

That was 15 minutes after the Fort Worth Mayor citing 33,ooo homes without power.

That was maybe 90 minutes after our Mayor said he has 67 homes without power

and is sending municipal workers and any available electricians so he could notify ONCOR by 5PM today.

One of these 3 people is lying. Bigly.

ERCOT release

Customers that remain without power likely fall into one of these three categories:
  • Areas out due to ice storm damage on the distribution system
  • Areas that were taken out of service due to the energy emergency load shed that need to be restored manually (i.e., sending a crew to the location to reenergize the line)
  • Large industrial facilities that voluntarily went offline to help during this energy emergency
As of 6:30 p.m., nearly 36,000 MW of generation remains on forced outage due to this winter weather event. Of that, approximately 21,400 MW is thermal generation and the rest is wind and solar.

Temperature are supposed to be as low as 9 tonight with a high of 38 Friday, 58 Saturday with flash flooding warnings.

Everything is bigger in Texas /s

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
PhD Principal
8.1.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Split Personality @8.1    one week ago
Abbott is currently on TV saying that no home in Texas will be without power tonight. Everything is bigger in Texas /s

Including the politicians' lies, it seems.  Maybe he thought nobody would hear him say that - hard to catch him on TV when your electricity is out.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
9  Tacos!    one week ago

Wow. One crazy weather event and there’s a sudden rush to pile on Texas.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
9.1  Ender  replied to  Tacos! @9    one week ago

I wonder why all the talk of secession has sudden ceased...

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
9.1.1  Tacos!  replied to  Ender @9.1    one week ago

Has it? Was it a constant thing before? Maybe there is just other stuff for the media to cover.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
9.1.2  Split Personality  replied to  Tacos! @9.1.1    one week ago

Like the Jefferson bs in California, Texas Republicans bring it up almost annually like a bad joke.

Shot down by the TX Supreme Court in Dec 2020,

another state HR has recently asked that it be allowed as a non binding resolution in the next election.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Guide
9.1.3  Tacos!  replied to  Split Personality @9.1.2    one week ago

Sure. It comes up. But it’s not like it’s a daily thing tacked on to the end of the weather report or something. There are occasional proposals all over the country for secession from the country or a state. A sudden change of heart due to the snow storms is not why we aren’t hearing about it this week.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
9.1.4  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Split Personality @9.1.2    one week ago
Texas Republicans bring it up almost annually like a bad joke. Shot down by the TX Supreme Court in Dec 2020

Must be talking about tejas leaving the union , saw an article last night where the author was talking about how that is still taught AND  debated in schools down there.

 have a friend who use to live here , came up from texas and lasted about 5 years before he moved back  to the FW area.

 how we met was him talking about how texas had the right to leave the union if they voted to .

 I of course very unpolitely pointed out a couple "facts " that he had failed to take into account.

The main fact was that Texas was not living under or could apply the state constitution they HAD written when they first joined the union , even if it did have a clause that allowed them to seperate from the US.

The second fact which put a rather large burr in his chaps was by the fact that texas joined the confederacy , AND lost , before they could rejoin the union a whole new state constitution had to be presented to the federal government for approval that DID NOT include that seperarting clause.

he didnt like that even after he check it out for himself and found out it was true.

unless i am wrong , there is only one state that still has a seperating clause in their state constitution that was accepted when they were granted statehood, and most people are really surprised as to which state it is , not that they would ever use it , and i dont know if they ever had it removed by themselves , but that state is Vermont , they kept their options open back in the 1700s to either be part of the US or part of Canada . which being a border state back them would have been easy to do if they chose.

 of course the civil war actually answered once and for all the question of secession by a state.

 i did ask the friend in FW how things were going and he sent me pictures , i sent him pictures of my bare yard and the thermometer reading in the low 30s , he called me an asshole .....

dont know why this posted like i C&Ped the whole thing , my apologies.

 
 
 
Dulay
PhD Principal
9.1.5  Dulay  replied to  Tacos! @9.1.1    one week ago
Has it? Was it a constant thing before? Maybe there is just other stuff for the media to cover.

Biedermann H.B.1359
A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT relating to proposing a referendum to the people of the State of Texas on the question of whether this state should leave the United
States of America and establish an independent republic.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
9.1.6  Split Personality  replied to  Dulay @9.1.5    one week ago

Kyle's an idiot. Like Mark said, many still believe Texas can be broken up into 5 states per their original admittance.

Since re admittance after the CW that's gone. They have about as good a chance at secession as Jefferson.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
9.2  Split Personality  replied to  Tacos! @9    one week ago

On the one hand we witnessed a rare split polar vortex that compromised much of the South, even Mexico.

On the other hand this is the 3rd time since 1989 and rather than fix it, Texas relaxes regulations under GOP

Governors Clements, Bush & Perry.

There really is little excuse not to have a properly protected infrastructure for producing reliable power.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
9.2.1  Tessylo  replied to  Split Personality @9.2    one week ago

It's like 'fuck it all and we can just blame it on the Democrats!'

 
 
 
cjcold
PhD Quiet
9.2.2  cjcold  replied to  Split Personality @9.2    one week ago

Didn't lose power but my water pipes have been frozen solid for over a week.

 
 
 
devangelical
Masters Expert
9.2.3  devangelical  replied to  Split Personality @9.2    one week ago

my power finally came on this afternoon. still no water at the condo, maybe tomorrow, probably not. property management shut off the water to the unheated units without draining the pipes. there's already been some flooding incidents. the HOA board are all trumpsters. should be fun.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
9.2.4  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  cjcold @9.2.2    one week ago

Likely dont have to say this , but here are some tips for frozen pipes , keep your taps open, it allows for a little expansion , and it allows you to see if the pipes are starting to thaw.

 keep cabinet doors under the sinks open so ambient room temp can get to them and help thaw them out  from the sink/ tap side.

other than that its a waiting game.depending where the freeze is , if its inside the house , might have to get a salamader heater to heat under the house , if its froze at the service connection , well not much you can do about that..

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
Professor Expert
9.3  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Tacos! @9    one week ago

Nah..... It didn't take the weather event for all the verbal abuse...... Texas has managed to earn that action no matter what the weather.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
10  Split Personality    one week ago
Well some of them did die to protect slavery.

And?  Is this a pissing contest to see how low you can go to irritate a few Texans

about something that happened before any of us were born?

Do you think that Illinois has a better history regarding slavery or that Southern Illinois men did not fight for the Confederacy?

Better think again.

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
Junior Guide
11  Just Jim NC TttH    one week ago

From a friend in Texas..................

256

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
11.1  Tessylo  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @11    one week ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
11.2  Texan1211  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @11    one week ago

All too true!

My stepson has two generators at his home, ran extension cords to both neighbors so they could at least get some heat going until power was restored.

 
 
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Snuffy


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