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bob-nelson
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SO A NAZI WALKS INTO AN IRON BAR: THE MEYER LANSKY STORY


By:  @bob-nelson, 53 minutes ago
Comments:  1
Latest By:  @bob-nelson, 53 minutes ago

“The Nazi scumbags were meeting one night on the second floor. Nat Arno and I went upstairs and threw stink bombs into the room where the creeps were. As they came out of the room, running from the horrible odor of the stink bombs and running down the steps to go into the street to escape, our boys were waiting with bats and iron bars. It was like running a gauntlet. Our boys were lined up on both sides and we started hitting, aiming for their heads or any other part of their bodies, with... 
 
kavika
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The 'Long Hot Summer of 1967'


By:  @kavika, yesterday
Comments:  87
Latest By:  @kavika, 6 hours ago

For those of you too young, or were not born in the 60's it was a decade of violence throughout the U.S. 1967 wasn't the beginning or the end. The 60's were a powder keg. Civil rights, the war in Vietnam being the center of most of the violence, it started long before 1967 and ended well after 1967... 1967 is simply a violent year in mist of a more than a decade of violence.  Today, with the violence in Charlottesville and the peaceful protests in Boston, it's time to look back at... 
 
jwc2blue
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How US Naval Ships Are Named


By:  @jwc2blue, 15 hours ago
Comments:  6
Latest By:  @community, 11 hours ago

https://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm Naming Ships The procedures and practices involved in Navy ship naming are the products of evolution and tradition than of legislation. The names for new ships are personally decided by the Secretary of the Navy. Ship name recommendations are conditioned by such factors as the name categories for ship types now being built, as approved by the Secretary of the Navy; the distribution of geographic names of ships of the Fleet; names borne... 
 
johnrussell
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Wreckage Of USS Indianapolis, Sunk By Japanese In WWII, Found In Pacific


By:  @johnrussell, 2 days ago
Comments:  2
Latest By:  @kavika, 2 days ago

For 72 years since the cruiser USS Indianapolis sank after being struck by Japanese torpedoes in the waning days of World War II, her exact resting place had been a mystery. But a team of researchers led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen now says they have positively identified the wreckage, 18,000 feet below the surface in the Philippine Sea.   This undated image from a remotely operated underwater vehicle courtesy of Paul G. Allen, shows a spare parts box... 
 
bob-nelson
Statues don’t need to venerate military leaders of the Civil War to promulgate false narratives Looking at the east frieze of the Confederate Monument at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States Wikimedia Commons e violence witnessed in Charlottesville, Virginia, during a white nationalist rally thrust the debate about Confederate monuments onto the nation's front pages. Should statues honoring the leaders of the Confederacy, like that of... 
 
johnrussell
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History Item - The Real Robert E Lee


By:  @johnrussell, 3 days ago
Comments:  9
Latest By:  @tig, 2 days ago

This isn’t about trying to forget our past—it’s about refusing to honor men who fought for an unjust cause. It’s about addressing injustice, then and now.   thehumanist.com Racism Past and Present - TheHumanist.com Judd Lienhard In the wake of the tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia, this past weekend stemming from a white supremacist rally to protest the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue in the city, it’s worth taking a minute to remember the... 
 
sharpshooter
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National Airborne Day - Death From Above


By:  @sharpshooter, 6 days ago
Comments:  29
Latest By:  @jeremy-in-nc, 3 days ago

[jrEmbed module="jrYouTube" youtube_id="CtyowB0aLQU"] August 16, 1940 marked the first official Army parachute jump, validating the innovative concept of inserting United States ground combat forces behind a battle line by parachute. On August 14, 2002 President George W. Bush issued the following proclamation: The history of airborne forces began after World War I , when Brigadier General William Mitchell first conceived the idea of parachuting troops into combat.... 
 
kavika
The air crackled with excitement, nothing like this had taken place before. 66,000 screaming fans with the first $100 ringside tickets were about to see history.  Joe Louis a black American was fighting the pride of Nazi Germany, Max Schmeling.  Schmeling had inflicted Louis's only defeat with a 12th round knock out. Joe went on to win the Heavyweight title after that defeat but declared that he would not consider himself champion until he defeated Schmeling and avenged his only... 
 
bob-nelson
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When Jack Daniel’s Failed to Honor a Slave, an Author Rewrote History


By:  @bob-nelson, 5 days ago
Comments:  5
Latest By:  @kavika, 4 days ago

Fawn Weaver on a farm in Lynchburg, Tenn., where Nearest Green and Jack Daniel first began distilling whiskey together. Nathan Morgan for The New York Times Fawn Weaver was on vacation in Singapore last summer when she first read about Nearest Green, the Tennessee slave who taught Jack Daniel how to make whiskey. Green’s existence had long been an open secret, but in 2016 Brown-Forman, the company that owns the Jack Daniel Distillery here, made international headlines... 
 
bob-nelson
The POWs burrowed to freedom from a Welsh encampment in 1945 Plotting a route out? German prisoners in Britain during WWII Ministry of Information Photo Division Photographe It only takes the opening notes of the theme tune to 1963 classic film The Great Escape for most people to conjure up images of the lives of prisoners of wars – and their escapes – during World War II. The film, based on the best-selling book of the same name, tells the story of how British Commonwealth... 
 
bob-nelson
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The Wealthy Activist Who Helped Turn “Bleeding Kansas” Free


By:  @bob-nelson, 4 days ago
Comments:  1
Latest By:  @bob-nelson, 4 days ago

Newly minted abolitionist Amos Adams Lawrence funneled much of his fortune into a battle he thought America couldn’t afford to lose A print from Harper’s showing Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863 Image courtesy of Library of Congress In May 24, 1854, Anthony Burns, a young African-American man, was captured on his way home from work. He had escaped from slavery in Virginia and had made his way to Boston, where he was employed in a men’s clothing store.... 
 
bob-nelson
Benjamin Lay said he was “illiterate,” but his antislavery arguments were erudite. This portrait, commissioned by Lay’s friend Benjamin Franklin, shows him with a book. Benjamin Lay by William Williams, Sr. (1750-1758) / National Portrait Gallery, Si; Binoculars: Michele Marconi Overlooked by historians, Benjamin Lay was one of the nation’s first radicals to argue for an end to slavery n September 19, 1738, a man named Benjamin Lay strode into a Quaker meetinghouse in... 
 
kavika
The Greensboro Massacre: North Carolina’s Deadly KKK Shootout   Matt Gilligan Medium History Murders And Crime Society & Laws Weird On November 3, 1979,  a planned march  in Greensboro, North Carolina took a deadly turn when members of the Communist Workers’ Party (CWP) clashed with individuals from the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party. The melee,... 
 
kavika
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Guam Today and Guam July 21st, 1944 - The Second Battle of Guam


By:  @kavika, one week ago
Comments:  11
Latest By:  @kavika, 6 days ago

Most American's know little about Guam or it's people. With North Korean threatening to attack Guam it once again is in the news. The people of Guam are called Chamorros, native Indians of the Island. They are very patriotic and enlist in the U.S. Military in great numbers considering how small the population is. They are AMERICANS and part of our nation.  On December 8, 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 5,000 Japanese troops attacked Guam defended by only 400 troops. The island... 
 
bob-nelson
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An Alternative History of Singapore, Through a Comic Book


By:  @bob-nelson, one week ago
Comments:  1
Latest By:  @bob-nelson, one week ago

The graphic artist Sonny Liew in his studio in Singapore, which is decorated with his drawings and cutouts of his characters. He has written an alternative history to the government creation story. Sim Chi Yin for The New York Times For half a century, Singapore’s creation story has been one of tough love. It goes something like this: Newly independent from its bigger neighbor Malaysia, small and vulnerable in the middle of the Cold War, beset by Communist infiltrators... 
 
bob-nelson
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What’s the Problem with Low Inflation?


By:  @bob-nelson, 2 weeks ago
Comments:  2
Latest By:  @harryh, 2 weeks ago

The Issue : Today's low inflation has some economists puzzled. The Federal Reserve has persistently undershot its inflation target of 2 percent since 2012, when it established this level of inflation as one of its policy goals. Modest inflation has a number of benefits, and some concerns have been raised by the persistence of inflation below this target level. These recent concerns stand in stark contrast to the experience of the 1970s when the inflation rate reached double... 
 
kpr37
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Reviving the original meaning of "demoralize."


By:  @kpr37, 2 weeks ago
Comments:  8
Latest By:  @bob-nelson, 2 weeks ago

Here's something in the "Suggestions" section of James Damore's suddenly famous memo : De-moralize diversity . As soon as we start to moralize an issue, we stop thinking about it in terms of costs and benefits, dismiss anyone that disagrees as immoral, and harshly punish those we see as villains to protect the “victims.” The hyphen in "de-moralize" shows the writer meant to distinguish his word from the usual "demoralize" and to push us to see the new, unusual meaning he intends... 
 
kavika
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Red Jacket Defends Native American Religion Against Christian Missionaries


By:  @kavika, 2 weeks ago
Comments:  19
Latest By:  @kavika, 2 weeks ago

Red Jacket Defends Native American Religion, 1805 by Red Jacket The Senecas, members of the Iroquois Confederacy, fought on the side of the British in the American Revolution. Red Jacket, also known as Sagoyewatha, was a chief and orator born in eastern New York; he derived his English name from his habit of wearing many red coats provided to him by his British allies. After the hostilities, as the British ceded their territories to the Americans, the Senecas and many other Indian... 
 
kavika
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The 'Two-Spirit' People of Indigenous North Americans


By:  @kavika, 3 weeks ago
Comments:  23
Latest By:  @kavika, 2 weeks ago

The is an article written by Walter L. Williams and explains the cultural differences between Native Americans and Anglo-Americans when it comes to the understanding of male and female. In some instances I have added by own thoughts to this article my Professor Williams. How many genders are there? To a modern Anglo-American, nothing might seem more definite than the answer that there are two: men and women.  But not all societies around the world agree with Western culture's view that... 
 
kavika
In the 1920s, the Osage found themselves in a unique position among Native Americans tribes. As other tribal lands were parceled out in an effort by the government to encourage dissolution and assimilation of both lands and culture, the Osage negotiated to maintain the mineral rights for their corner of Oklahoma, creating a kind of “underground reservation.” It proved a savvy move; soon countless oil rigs punctured the dusty landscape, making the Osage very rich. And that’s when they... 
 
krishna
 This article was inspired by Buzz's article: Before the days of TV, what was your favourite radio program, and why? I decided to try to do an article about Radio commercials- - and as a challenge.to do it as a quiz. (If you score 100% or more you might get a gold star. But then again you might not. After all, only the Shadow knows...) 1. If, by chance, you ever wished to be a weiner, what type would it be? (Answers containing the word "Anthony" or any variant thereof won't... 
 
kavika
A group of Indigenous people that are virtually unknown in the the United States. The Metis people of Canada are recognized by the Canadian Government as a Canadian Aboriginal group. The history of the Metis is very interesting. French, Scottish and English men married Ojibwe, Cree, Algonquin and Menominee women in the 16th and 17th century and speak a language called Michif or Michif/Cree that is a combination of French, Ojibwe and Cree. They number 400,000 in Canada, and as you... 
 
kavika
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The Four Chaplin's - Courage


By:  @kavika, 3 weeks ago
Comments:  2
Latest By:  @kavika, 2 weeks ago

Whether you are a believer or non-believer this story of courage by four Chaplin's is sure to make you proud of them. This article is not about religion, pro or con. It is about four men who through their bravery and faith are linked to history forever. The  U.S.A.T. Dorchester  was an aging, luxury coastal liner that was no longer luxurious.  In the nearly four years from December 7, 1941 to September 2, 1945 more than 16 million American men and women were called upon to... 
 
dowser
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Kentucky in the Civil War - Nancy's Fire, Elizabethtown, KY


By:  @dowser, 4 years ago
Comments:  44
Latest By:  @community, 2 weeks ago

My great-great grandmother, Nancy Ann Edlin Trumbo was a full-blooded Cherokee, whose family escaped The Place Where They Cried(what we call The Trail of Tears). Both of her parents, Hannah Essex Edlin and James Edlin, were Cherokee, but owned land near Hodgenville, (Lincolns birthplace), in Kentucky. Their land was in their hands long before the Trail of Tears, and during the trying times of the Civil War. Edlin is an English name-- I have to wonder if they took an English name to... 
 
johnrussell
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Before transgender was a word, women served as men


By:  @johnrussell, 3 weeks ago
Comments:  95
Latest By:  @goodtime-charlie, 3 weeks ago

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-tsui-transgender-history-wars-20170730-story.html One of the toughest military enlistments in the Civil War was served by a woman who dressed as a man. Private Albert D.J. Cashier, born Jennie Hodgers in Clogher Head, Ireland, marched thousands of miles and fought in dozens of battles and skirmishes with the 95th Illinois Infantry. Cashier joined the regiment at the beginning of the war for a three-year term, and continued fighting until... 
 
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